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Lleida, Spain

Ortiz A.,Area de Post Collita | Vendrell M.,Consorci CSIC IRTA | Lara I.,Area de Post Collita
Acta Horticulturae | Year: 2010

Rapid softening of peach (Prunus persica L. Batsch) fruit after harvest considerably limits commercial life of produce. The decline in fruit firmness during ripening and storage is largely the result of partial disassembly of the primary cell wall arising from compositional changes. In this work, suitability of controlled atmosphere (CA) storage and 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) treatment to delay these changes and to extend storage potential of a late-harvesting peach cultivar was tested. Cell wall materials were extracted and fractionated 0 and 7 d after storage to assess possible relationships to changes in fruit firmness. The yield of soluble materials increased during the shelf life period at 20°C, consistent with a decline in the contents of cell wall materials and of pectin-containing fractions, possibly in relation to the decrease in flesh firmness. The increase in the yield of soluble fractions after storage was attenuated by 1-MCP treatment, which proved more effective than CA storage in delaying solubilisation of cell wall polymers.


Cano-Salazar J.,Area de Post Collita | Echeverria G.,Area de Post Collita | Crisosto C.H.,University of California at Davis | Lopez L.,Area de Post Collita
Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry | Year: 2012

'Early Rich', 'Royal Glory', 'Sweet Dream cov', and 'Elegant Lady' peaches were stored at -0.5 °C for up to 40 days and then subjected to ripening at 20 °C for up to 3 days. Firmness, soluble solids content (SSC), titratable acidity (TA), color, consumer acceptance, and volatile compounds were then determined. The observed physicochemical changes included a significant decrease in firmness during both storage and commercialization periods. In contrast, the SSC, TA, and color remained constant during storage. Ten days of cold storage produced the highest total volatile emissions and the greatest consumer acceptance for 'Elegant Lady' and 'Sweet Dream cov', whereas similar results were obtained after 40 and 20 days for 'Royal Glory' and 'Early Rich', respectively. Volatile compounds that most consistently exhibited a positive correlation with consumer acceptance were dependent on the cultivar. © 2011 American Chemical Society.


Cano-Salazar J.,Area de Post Collita | Lopez L.,Area de Post Collita | Crisosto C.H.,University of California at Davis | Echeverria G.,Area de Post Collita
European Food Research and Technology | Year: 2013

The effects of cold storage and shelf life of 'Big Top,' 'Honey Blazecov,' 'Honey Royalecov,' 'Venus,' 'August Red,' and 'Nectagalacov' nectarines were evaluated. Volatile compounds, firmness, soluble solids content, titratable acidity, color, and degree of consumer acceptance of the fruit were determined at harvest, after storage at -0.5 °C for 10, 20, or 40 days and following 3 days at 20 °C. Ten days cold storage plus 3 days at 20 °C produced the highest total ester emission for 'Nectagalacov' and 'August Red,' while similar results were obtained after 10 days cold storage for the 'Big Top' and 'Honey Blazecov' and 20 days cold storage for 'Honey Royalecov' and 'Venus.' For 'Nectagalacov,' this higher total ester emission coincided with the greatest percentage of satisfied consumers. Increased consumer acceptance was associated with the cultivars and storage time that resulted in firmer fruits and greater concentrations of specific volatile compounds. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.


Ortiz A.,Area de Post Collita | Echeverria G.,Area de Post Collita | Graell J.,Area de Post Collita | Lara I.,Area de Post Collita
Acta Horticulturae | Year: 2010

'Fuji Kiku-8' apples, harvested at commercial maturity, were dipped in calcium chloride (2% w/v) and stored at 1°C and 92% RH for 4 or 7 months under air plus 7 days at 20°C. The calcium concentration was higher in treated fruit, showing that the treatment was effective in introducing calcium into the tissues. In general, calcium treatment led to enhanced production of those aroma volatile compounds considered to have an impact on overall flavour of 'Fuji Kiku-8' apples cold-stored for 4 months. Higher aroma volatile emission in calcium-treated fruit possibly arose from enhanced supply of precursors for ester production as a consequence of increased pyruvate decarboxylase (PDC) and alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) activities. This effect was not so apparent after long-term storage periods. After 7 months of cold storage, higher levels of aroma volatile compounds emitted by calcium-treated apples could have arisen from increased alcohol oacyltransferase (AAT) activity. Moreover, consumer acceptability was higher in calcium-treated samples, thus suggesting that calcium treatments, apart from having beneficial effects on aroma volatile compounds production, may be useful for improving sensory quality of cold-stored 'Fuji Kiku-8' apples.


Ortiz A.,Area de Post Collita | Echeverria G.,Area de Post Collita | Graell J.,Area de Post Collita | Lara I.,Area de Post Collita
Acta Horticulturae | Year: 2010

'Fuji Kiku-8' and 'Golden Reinders' apples, harvested at commercial maturity, were dipped in calcium chloride (2% w/v) and stored at 1°C and 92% RH for 4 or 7 months under air. The calcium concentration was higher in treated fruit, showing that the treatment was effective in introducing calcium into the tissues. A number of sensory attributes were assessed after cold storage plus 7 days at 20°C by a panel of 9 trained judges. Simultaneously, a panel of 45 consumers was asked to evaluate overall acceptance of samples according to a hedonic scale (1-9). Firmness, soluble solids content and titratable acidity were instrumentally measured in order to assess a possible correlation between parameters instrumentally and sensorily evaluated. For both cultivars, calcium treatment resulted in higher crispness and perceived hardness. Multivariate analysis of data revealed that perception of both crispness and sweetness were the parameters most related to consumer acceptability. Besides, perception of mealiness, which was reduced by calcium applications, appeared to be detrimental for overall consumer acceptability. In consequence, results suggest calcium treatments to be a good practice to enhance sensory quality of cold-stored apples. On the other hand, weak correlations were found between sensorily and instrumentally measured quality parameters, thus indicating the usefulness of sensory tests to assess the effects of postharvest procedures on the quality of produce.

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