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Campa A.,Area de Cultivos Hortofruticolas y Forestales | Rodriguez-Suarez C.,CSIC - Institute for Sustainable Agriculture | Giraldez R.,University of Oviedo | Ferreira J.J.,Area de Cultivos Hortofruticolas y Forestales
BMC Plant Biology | Year: 2014

Background: Bean anthracnose is caused by the fungus Colletotrichum lindemuthianum (Sacc. & Magnus) Lams.- Scrib. Resistance to C. lindemuthianum in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) generally follows a qualitative mode of inheritance. The pathogen shows extensive pathogenic variation and up to 20 anthracnose resistance loci (named Co-), conferring resistance to specific races, have been described. Anthracnose resistance has generally been investigated by analyzing a limited number of isolates or races in segregating populations. In this work, we analyzed the response against eleven C. lindemuthianum races in a recombinant inbred line (RIL) common bean population derived from the cross Xana × Cornell 49242 in which a saturated linkage map was previously developed.Results: A systematic genetic analysis was carried out to dissect the complex resistance segregations observed, which included contingency analyses, subpopulations and genetic mapping. Twenty two resistance genes were identified, some with a complementary mode of action. The Cornell 49242 genotype carries a complex cluster of resistance genes at the end of linkage group (LG) Pv11 corresponding to the previously described anthracnose resistance cluster Co-2. In this position, specific resistance genes to races 3, 6, 7, 19, 38, 39, 65, 357, 449 and 453 were identified, with one of them showing a complementary mode of action. In addition, Cornell 49242 had an independent gene on LG Pv09 showing a complementary mode of action for resistance to race 453. Resistance genes in genotype Xana were located on three regions involving LGs Pv01, Pv02 and Pv04. All resistance genes identified in Xana showed a complementary mode of action, except for two controlling resistance to races 65 and 73 located on LG Pv01, in the position of the previously described anthracnose resistance cluster Co-1.Conclusions: Results shown herein reveal a complex and specific interaction between bean and fungus genotypes leading to anthracnose resistance. Organization of specific resistance genes in clusters including resistance genes with different modes of action (dominant and complementary genes) was also confirmed. Finally, new locations for anthracnose resistance genes were identified in LG Pv09. © 2014 Campa et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. Source


Ferreira J.J.,Area de Cultivos Hortofruticolas y Forestales | Campa A.,Area de Cultivos Hortofruticolas y Forestales | Perez-Vega E.,Area de Cultivos Hortofruticolas y Forestales | Rodriguez-Suarez C.,CSIC - Institute for Sustainable Agriculture | Giraldez R.,University of Oviedo
Theoretical and Applied Genetics | Year: 2012

Anthracnose and bean common mosaic (BCM) are considered major diseases in common bean crop causing severe yield losses worldwide. This work describes the introgression and pyramiding of genes conferring genetic resistance to BCM and anthracnose local races into line A25, a bean genotype classified as market class fabada. Resistant plants were selected using resistance tests or combining resistance tests and marker-assisted selection. Lines A252, A321, A493, Sanilac BC6-Are, and BRB130 were used as resistance sources. Resistance genes to anthracnose (Co-2 C, Co-2 A252 and Co-3/9) and/or BCM (I and bc-3) were introgressed in line A25 through six parallel backcrossing programs, and six breeding lines showing a fabada seed phenotype were obtained after six backcross generations: line A1258 from A252; A1231 from A321; A1220 from A493; A1183 and A1878 from Sanilac BC6-Are; and line A2418 from BRB130. Pyramiding of different genes were developed using the pedigree method from a single cross between lines obtained in the introgression step: line A1699 (derived from cross A1258 × A1220), A2438 (A1220 × A1183), A2806 (A1878 × A2418), and A3308 (A1699 × A2806). A characterization based on eight morpho-agronomic traits revealed a limited differentiation among the obtained breeding lines and the recurrent line A25. However, using a set of seven molecular markers linked to the loci used in the breeding programs it was possible to differentiate the 11 fabada lines. Considering the genetic control of the resistance in resistant donor lines, the observed segregations in the last backcrossing generation, the reaction against the pathogens, and the expression of the molecular markers it was also possible to infer the genotype conferring resistance in the ten fabada breeding lines obtained. As a result of these breeding programs, genetic resistance to three anthracnose races controlled by genes included in clusters Co-2 and Co-3/9, and genetic resistance to BCM controlled by genotype I + bc-3 was combined in the fabada line A3308. © 2011 Springer-Verlag. Source


Perez-Vega E.,Area de Cultivos Hortofruticolas y Forestales | Pascual A.,Area de Cultivos Hortofruticolas y Forestales | Campa A.,Area de Cultivos Hortofruticolas y Forestales | Giraldez R.,University of Oviedo | And 2 more authors.
Molecular Breeding | Year: 2012

White mold, caused by the fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (Lib.) de Bary, is a devastating disease in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). Resistance to this pathogen can be due to physiological or avoidance mechanisms. We sought to characterize the partial physiological resistance exhibited by Xana dry bean in the greenhouse straw test using quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis. A population of 104 F7 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) derived from an inter-gene pool cross between Xana and the susceptible black bean Cornell 49242 was evaluated against five local isolates of Sclerotinia. The effect of morphological traits (plant height, first internode length, and first internode width) on response to white mold was examined. The level of resistance exhibited by Xana to five isolates of S. sclerotiorum was similar to that of the well-known resistant lines PC50, A195, and G122. Eighteen QTL, involving the linkage groups (LG) 1, 3, 6, 7, 8, and 11, were found to be significant in at least one evaluation and in the mean of the two evaluations. The number of significant QTL identified per trait ranged from one to five. Four major regions on LG 1, 6, and 7 were associated with partial resistance to white mold, confirming the results obtained in other populations. A relative specificity in the number and the position of the identified QTL was found depending on the isolate used. QTL involved in the control of morphological traits and in the response to white mold were co-located at the same relative position on LG 1, 6, and 7. The role of these genomic regions in physiological resistance or avoidance mechanisms to white mold is discussed. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media B.V. Source


Ferreira J.J.,Area de Cultivos Hortofruticolas y Forestales | Garcia-Gonzalez C.,Area de Cultivos Hortofruticolas y Forestales | Tous J.,IRTA Mas de Bover | Rovira M.,IRTA Mas de Bover
Plant Breeding | Year: 2010

Hazelnut (Corylus avellana L.) has been a traditional crop in northern Spain. As a result of germplasm exploration over 3 years (2003-05), 90 trees were selected in this region. This study describes phenotypic variation in nut and husk traits and investigates genetic relationships among selections and cultivars using inter simple sequences repeat (ISSR) markers. The local selections were phenotypically diverse and many had characteristics appreciated by the market. Eleven ISSR primers, which generated 66 polymorphic bands, were used in the analysis. The graph from principal coordinates analysis of the molecular marker data showed two main groups, one for the local selections and the other for the standard cultivars. The dendrogram generated from UPGMA cluster analysis showed the same two main groups. The results suggest that the local accessions are closely related to each other, but are relatively distant from the standard cultivars of eastern Spain, Italy and the USA. Selections from northern Spain may be directly useful as new cultivars or alternatively as parents in breeding programmes. The collection and preservation of this genetic diversity is important. © 2009 Blackwell Verlag GmbH. Source


Campa A.,Area de Cultivos Hortofruticolas y Forestales | Giraldez R.,University of Oviedo | Ferreira J.J.,Area de Cultivos Hortofruticolas y Forestales
Phytopathology | Year: 2011

Resistance to the eight races (3, 7, 19, 31, 81, 449, 453, and 1545) of the pathogenic fungus Colletotrichum lindemuthianum (anthracnose) was evaluated in F3 families derived from the cross between the anthracnose differential bean cultivars Kaboon and Michelite. Molecular marker analyses were carried out in the F2 individuals in order to map and characterize the anthracnose resistance genes or gene clusters present in Kaboon. The analysis of the combined segregations indicates that the resistance present in Kaboon against these eight anthracnose races is determined by 13 different race-specific genes grouped in three clusters. One of these clusters, corresponding to locus Co-1 in linkage group (LG) 1, carries two dominant genes conferring specific resistance to races 81 and 1545, respectively, and a gene necessary (dominant complementary gene) for the specific resistance to race 31. A second cluster, corresponding to locus Co-3/9 in LG 4, carries six dominant genes conferring specific resistance to races 3, 7, 19, 449, 453, and 1545, respectively, and the second dominant complementary gene for the specific resistance to race 31. A third cluster of unknown location carries three dominant genes conferring specific resistance to races 449, 453, and 1545, respectively. This is the first time that two anthracnose resistance genes with a complementary mode of action have been mapped in common bean and their relationship with previously known Co- resistance genes established. © 2011 The American Phytopathological Society. Source

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