Menlo Park, CA, United States
Menlo Park, CA, United States

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Ribeiro E.N.,Area 1 Security | Da Silva F.T.,University of Sao Paulo | De Paiva T.C.B.,University of Sao Paulo
Journal of Environmental Science and Health - Part A Toxic/Hazardous Substances and Environmental Engineering | Year: 2013

The present study evaluated the toxic potential and physicochemical characteristics of waste water generated in nitrocellulose production, including effluents from delignification, bleaching, nitration and mixture (composed of these three effluents), from a plant in the Paraiba Valley, So Paulo, Brazil. The test organisms used for toxicity assays were Daphnia similis, Danio rerio, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas putida and Pseudokircheneriella subcaptata. The results showed that the effluents analyzed present acute and chronic toxicity for the organisms tested. Nitration effluent was the least toxic, while delignification and bleaching effluents were the most toxic. The naturally occurring pollutants in wood fiber and cotton, like lignin, probably contributed to effluents toxicity, in addition to higher concentrations of total dissolved solids, which are in non-compliance with Brazilian legislation, conductivity, chemical oxygen demand and color. The discharge of nitrocellulose effluent into an aquatic environment should only occur after appropriate treatment, due to their toxic characteristics. © Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.


A data processing system comprising: a sensor computer that is coupled to and co-located with a compromised computer, the compromised computer comprising at least one malware item that is configured to direct unauthorized network activity toward one or more enterprise networks or enterprise computers, wherein the compromised computer is coupled to a firewall that is configured to control ingress of packets to the compromised computer and is logically between one or more attacker computers and the one or more enterprise networks or enterprise computers; a security control computer that is coupled to the sensor computer; one or more non-transitory data storage media in the security control computer storing security logic comprising one or more sequences of instructions which when executed cause the security control computer to perform: obtaining, from the sensor computer, detection data relating to network messages that the compromised computer emits, as the compromised computer emits the network messages; using the detection data, identifying one or more security threats that are indicated by the network messages; determining a specified remediation measure to remediate one or more of the security threats; providing the specified remediation measure to one or more of the compromised computer, the sensor computer, the firewall, and an enterprise computer.


In an embodiment, a data processing method providing an improvement in computer security comprises selecting, from a queue identifying a plurality of web pages, a particular web page to retrieve from one of a plurality of internet sources; causing retrieving a copy of the particular web page from a particular internet source; determining a hierarchical structure of the particular web page; based upon a hierarchical structure of the particular web page and without consideration of content of the particular web page, identifying one or more features, of links in the particular web page or files referenced in the particular web page, that indicate one or more security threats; determining a reputation score for the particular web page; determining a specified remediation measure, based upon the reputation score, to remediate a security threat that is identified in the particular web page; providing the specified remediation measure to one or more of a compromised computer, a sensor computer and an enterprise computer.


Trademark
Area 1 Security | Date: 2016-10-05

computer hardware, namely, sensors for searching the internet to identify and respond to computer security vulnerabilities. computer software for sensing computer security threats; intrusion detection software; data collection software; computer software for the collection of data and information; software as a service (SAAS) for use in identifying and responding to computer security vulnerabilities; cloud computing featuring software for use in identifying and responding to computer security vulnerabilities; providing temporary use of online non-downloadable cloud computing software for identifying and responding to computer security vulnerabilities; computer security services, namely, enforcing, restricting and controlling access privileges of users of computing resources for cloud, mobile or network resources based on assigned credentials; computer security service, namely, restricting access to and by computer networks to and of undesired web sites, media and individuals and facilities; computer services, namely, integration of private and public cloud computing environments.


Trademark
Area 1 Security | Date: 2016-10-05

data analysis software; computer software for analyzing potential computer security threats. providing online non-downloadable data analysis software; providing online non-downloadable computer software for analyzing potential computer security threats; software as a service (SAAS) for use in identifying and responding to computer security vulnerabilities; cloud computing featuring software for use in identifying and responding to computer security vulnerabilities; providing temporary use of online non-downloadable cloud computing software for identifying and responding to computer security vulnerabilities; computer security services, namely, enforcing, restricting and controlling access privileges of users of computing resources for cloud, mobile or network resources based on assigned credentials; computer security service, namely, restricting access to and by computer networks to and of undesired web sites, media and individuals and facilities; computer services, namely, integration of private and public cloud computing environments.


News Article | May 5, 2014
Site: venturebeat.com

Three of the five-member Area 1 Security team are former National Security Agency tech spooks, and the other two come from Disney and MIT, said founder and chief executive Oren Falkowitz. Falkowitz spent eight years at the agency, where he specialized in “data missions;” that is, seeking out sophisticated computer network attacks, isolating them, and then analyzing their nature and specifics. It is those skills he’s bringing to Area 1 Security. The security platform Falkowitz and company are building out is, to the founders at least, unique. It is the “first to deliver a security solution that eliminates targeted social engineering attacks by focusing on behavioral patters of delivery systems,” the startup said in a release. The company looks at several factors in determining network attacks, Falkowitz says: how the attacks are delivered; the severity and patterns of the problem; distinguishing whether the attack is coming from a teenager sitting in a bedroom or from a nation state; and the volume of data involved. Falkowitz posits that exotic malware, of the kind that siphon’s key personal data from your desktop or mobile device is, in most cases, detected far too long after it’s been successfully launched against you. By then, he says, it’s often too late to do anything about it. Area 1 Security detects and works to isolate an attack before the thugs even have time to successfully launch it. Inside the NSA, Falkowitz had a ringside seat to some of the most sophisticated data breaches and violent network attacks. Indeed, he led an NSA data team focused almost solely on attack prediction, analytics, and types of possible threats. Investors in the seed round include Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers, Cowboy Ventures, Data Collective Venture Capital, First Round Capital, Allegis Capital, and individual investors.


News Article | December 10, 2014
Site: www.eweek.com

A former NSA analyst pairs big data technology with new money to build out a security platform that is still in stealth. Security startup Area 1 Security today announced that it has raised $8 million in a Series A funding round led by Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers. In total, Area 1 has now raised $10.5 million in funding as the company aims to build out a new type of technology to help organizations defend themselves against social engineering attacks. "We look at all attacks as campaigns, and social engineering is typically the first phase or the first area for attack," Area 1 Security's CEO Oren Falkowitz told eWEEK. "We are focused on that first area of attack, getting good visibility and helping to prevent attack escalation." Falkowitz is no stranger to the world of security, previously having spent six years working at the National Security Agency (NSA), working in part in the office of Tailored Access Operations (TAO). While at the NSA, Falkowitz helped develop the open-source Accumulo database, which is a data storage technology for Hadoop big data. "Accumulo embeds security access controls, so petabytes of data can be stored in a system that has thousands of users, all of whom can only see the level of data that they are authorized against," he said. "This is helpful for highly regulated industries like health care, finance and, of course, national defense."The technology platform that Area 1 Security is building is still in stealth, though Falkowitz was able to provide context into where it fits and what problem it is trying to solve. There are security companies that are trying to help train IT users about the dangers of social engineering, but that's not what his company is aiming to do, he said. In a social engineering attack, a user is somehow tricked or manipulated into clicking on something malicious, which can end up exploiting a system.While education is an important piece in limiting social engineering risks, Falkowitz said that fundamentally humans cannot be relied upon to always spot potential attacks. In contrast, the platform that Area 1 Security is building is centered on the idea of identifying specific behaviors and delivery mechanisms for social engineering attacks. While some social engineering attacks leverage zero-day vulnerabilities in application software, the Area 1 Security approach isn't concerned about unknown security flaws. "Our approach is not to spot every vulnerability that exists," Falkowitz said. "What we focus on is how attacks are delivered, and that is revealed by way of behavioral patterns." Vulnerabilities in software will always exist, according to Falkowitz. Area 1 Security is less interested in the attack payload than in the actual mechanics of a social engineering attack. From a technology perspective, the Area 1 Security platform will sit outside of the end-user environments and leverage a cloud back end. "We do have some integrations with some network edge devices for accuracy, and we have our own proprietary remediation capabilities," Falkowitz said. Area 1 Security currently is doing software pilots with a number of Fortune 500 companies across multiple industry verticals. "The goal is to continue to expand our technology platform and then have something that is more publicly commercial available toward the end of next year," Falkowitz said. Sean Michael Kerner is a senior editor at eWEEK and InternetNews.com. Follow him on Twitter @TechJournalist.


News Article | December 19, 2014
Site: www.xconomy.com

If venture firms still had any doubt about the cybersecurity field as a good prospect for investors, the ongoing wreckage inflicted by hackers on entertainment giant Sony over the past month may put those doubts to rest. Sony has seen everything from corporate salaries to its executives’ snide e-mail comments about President Obama and Angelina Jolie exposed by the hackers’ leaks. It has just canceled release of “The Interview,” the film that was the apparent target of the computer network invaders. It didn’t take a catastrophe on the scale of Sony’s, however, to get some VCs interested in the field. Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers general partner Ted Schlein, who came to KPCB after helping Symantec develop its commercial anti-virus software, has since backed a roster of security software startups. His latest bet is Menlo Park CA-based Area 1 Security, whose $8 million Series A financing, led by Schlein, was announced on a mid-December day when Sony was writhing under an onslaught of news stories mined from millions of formerly guarded company documents and e-mails. Area 1 CEO Oren Falkowitz (pictured above) says he co-founded the company in 2013 to concentrate on the crucial first steps in such a major cyber attack—the moment that even a single company employee clicks on a dicey link and unwittingly opens a doorway to intruders eager to install malware. “It only takes one,” says Falkowitz, who learned to observe patterns in these e-mail lures when he worked for six years at the National Security Agency, whose mission includes preventing foreign enemies from tapping into sources of U.S. government information that are key to the nation’s safety. Falkowitz’s co-founders include fellow NSA veterans Blake Darche and Phil Syme. Falkowitz says people are extraordinarily vulnerable to hackers’ tricks, such as deceptive online ads and e-mails that look like they come from your bank or a colleague. Sometimes the intruders send messages from legitimate websites they have hijacked to serve their purposes. “If a hacker sends a malicious e-mail to as few as 10 people, there’s a 90 percent success rate of one of those people clicking,” Falkowitz says. Once the intruders gain entry, they can take advantage of the first employee’s access to the company computer network, gradually inserting files and extending their reach, Falkowitz says. In a major attack like that at Sony, hackers may have been inside the network for nearly a year, he says. Area 1 is developing security technology to detect the characteristic methods used by hackers to manipulate people into clicking a dubious link. These messages deviate from normal patterns of communication, he says. “If you can stop the first phase—the e-mail part—then you can prevent the greatest damage.” Area 1 Security is now working in pilot mode with banks, energy companies, retailers, and other large concerns to gain feedback on its technology, Falkowitz says. The Series A round brings the startup’s fundraising total to $10.5 million. Investors who contributed to Area 1’s seed financing have also participated in its Series A round. They include Allegis Capital, Cowboy Ventures, Data Collective (DCVC), First Round Capital, RedSeal Networks CEO and former Venrock partner Ray Rothrock, and Shape Security CEO Derek Smith. The new capital will help Area 1 Security continue an expansion of its staff, which will number 15 by the beginning of 2015, Falkowitz says. The increasing use of mobile devices has made companies even more vulnerable to hackers, who use new technologies as fresh vectors to insert their malware, Falkowitz says. Staffers often load their work files onto phones and tablets so they can work remotely—sometimes connecting to the Web through unfamiliar Wi-fi connections. “They remove themselves from the safe environment at work, do something at home, and then bring that right back inside the company,” Falkowitz says. Established cybersecurity companies are retooling to handle the changing technological inroads for hackers, the changing nature of cyber attacks themselves, and the challenge of early detection. The ongoing string of cyber attacks at major companies, including Target and Home Depot as well as Sony, has heightened awareness of the potential losses in both dollars and reputation, Falkowitz says. Companies are now more willing to spend time and money to protect themselves, he says. “The market is just growing exponentially for the ability to control these kinds of losses,” Falkowitz says. Bernadette Tansey is Xconomy's San Francisco Editor. You can reach her at btansey@xconomy.com. Follow @Tansey_Xconomy


News Article | May 5, 2014
Site: www.finsmes.com

Backers included security and enterprise experts Ted Schlein, Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers; Cowboy Ventures; Data Collective (DCVC); First Round Capital; Allegis Capital; RedSeal Networks CEO and former Venrock partner Ray Rothrock; and Shape Security CEO Derek Smith. Led by Founder and CEO Oren Falkowitz, Area 1 Security provides a security solution that eliminates targeted social engineering attacks by focusing on behavioral patterns of delivery systems. The company intends to use the funds to further develop and scale its product.

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