Pleasanton, CA, United States

Arcxis Biotechnologies

www.arcxis.com
Pleasanton, CA, United States
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Satterfield B.C.,Arcxis Biotechnologies | Bartosiewicz M.,Arcxis Biotechnologies | West J.A.A.,Arcxis Biotechnologies | Caplan M.R.,Arizona State University
Journal of Molecular Diagnostics | Year: 2010

The failure to correctly identify single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) significantly contributes to the misdiagnosis of infectious disease. Contrary to the strategy of creating shorter probes to improve SNP differentiation, we created larger probes that appeared to increase selectivity. Specifically, probes with enhanced melting temperature differentials (>13x improvement) to SNPs were generated by linking two probes that consist of both a capture sequence and a detection sequence; these probes act cooperatively to improve selectivity over a wider range of reaction conditions. These cooperative probe constructs (Tentacle probes) were then compared by modeling thermodynamic and hybridization characteristics to both Molecular Beacons (stem loop DNA probes) and Taqman probes (a linear oligonucleotide). The biophysical models reveal that cooperative probes compared with either Molecular beacons or Taqman probes have enhanced specificity. This was a result of increased melting temperature differentials and the concentration-independent hybridization revealed between wild-type and variant sequences. We believe these findings of order of magnitude enhanced melting temperature differentials with probes possessing concentration independence and more favorable binding kinetics have the potential to significantly improve molecular diagnostic assay functionality. Copyright © American Society for Investigative Pathology and the Association for Molecular Pathology.


Hukari K.W.,Arcxis Biotechnologies | Shultz M.,Arcxis Biotechnologies | Isely N.,Arcxis Biotechnologies | Milson R.,Arcxis Biotechnologies | West J.A.A.,Arcxis Biotechnologies
Journal of Laboratory Automation | Year: 2011

Molecular diagnostic analysis and life science studies are dependent on the ability to effectively prepare samples for analysis. We report the development of a system that enables robust sample preparation of nucleic acids. To enable completely automated sample preparation, a consumable cartridge and consumable module system were developed to emulate every step of the sample preparation process. This included enzyme and reagent addition, temperature-controlled incubations, noncontact mixing of enzymes and reagents, buffer exchanges, and sample elution. Using this system, completely automated methods were developed for the purification of viral RNA and DNA from plasma and whole blood and of bacterial genomic DNA from water and whole blood. Extracted nucleic acids were detected and quantified using real-time PCR. The data indicate that automated viral DNA extraction was more efficient than sample extractions performed using a manual process, whereas automated total RNA extraction from the same samples was equivalent to controls. Additionally, we found that the process for bacterial genomic DNA extraction from either water or whole blood was equivalent to the manual extraction processes. We conclude the instrument, consumable cartridge, and reagent system enables easy, cost-effective, and robust sample preparation regardless of the experience of the operator. © 2011 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.


Patent
Arcxis Biotechnologies | Date: 2010-07-14

The present invention relates generally to systems and methods for processing a biological sample that result in a physical change, such as reacting two molecules together to form a reaction product or for use in lysing viruses or biological cells for analysis using biological assay systems. As such, the present invention relates both to breaking apart biological species such as viruses and cells, as well as the formation of reactants from one or more reactive species. The sample has a volume in the range from about 1 microliter to 10 milliliters. The sample is processed by applying pressure, and either sonic energy or thermal energy to the sample, wherein the pressure achieved is usually at least 24 atmospheres, and the temperature of the sample is usually raised to at least 50 C.


PubMed | Arcxis Biotechnologies
Type: Comparative Study | Journal: Journal of laboratory automation | Year: 2011

Molecular diagnostic analysis and life science studies are dependent on the ability to effectively prepare samples for analysis. We report the development of a system that enables robust sample preparation of nucleic acids. To enable completely automated sample preparation, a consumable cartridge and consumable module system were developed to emulate every step of the sample preparation process. This included enzyme and reagent addition, temperature-controlled incubations, noncontact mixing of enzymes and reagents, buffer exchanges, and sample elution. Using this system, completely automated methods were developed for the purification of viral RNA and DNA from plasma and whole blood and of bacterial genomic DNA from water and whole blood. Extracted nucleic acids were detected and quantified using real-time PCR. The data indicate that automated viral DNA extraction was more efficient than sample extractions performed using a manual process, whereas automated total RNA extraction from the same samples was equivalent to controls. Additionally, we found that the process for bacterial genomic DNA extraction from either water or whole blood was equivalent to the manual extraction processes. We conclude the instrument, consumable cartridge, and reagent system enables easy, cost-effective, and robust sample preparation regardless of the experience of the operator.

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