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East Missoula, MT, United States

Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 99.31K | Year: 2006

Critical large bearings in the F-35 thrust vector system must operate with absolute reliability under high loads, high heat and corrosive attack from salt air and fluorinated lubricant at elevated temperatures. A unique patented Filtered Arc Plasma Source Ion Deposition (FAPSID) process developed by Arcomac Surface Engineering will deposit an atomically bonded, multiple layered, integrated coating combining different metal and ceramic materials, each with specialized properties that improve both wear and corrosion resistance. This will further increase vector bearing performance, extend component life and reduce life cycle cost. Bearing components with optimized multiplex coating(s) will be rigorously evaluated for their durability and reliability under aggressive test conditions. The FAPSID process is scalable to produce production coatings on the large diameter bearing races in the F35 thrust vectoring system. These coatings have an enormous potential application to a wide range of military and civilian aircraft engine components that operate in severe wear and corrosive conditions.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 99.85K | Year: 2004

Critical gears and engine bearings in our newest vertical thrust aircraft must operate with absolute reliability under high loads, high heat, corrosive salt air and intervals without any lubricant whatever. Current materials and coatings that meet some of these conditions fail when subjected to the others. Now a breakthrough in surface engineering technology can precisely control deposition of coatings at the level of vaporized atoms. It can deposit an atomically bonded, multiple layered, integrated coating combining different metal and ceramic materials, each with a different desired property. Engine parts with the multiplex coating that will be perfected and rigorously tested in this program will be durable and reliable under all of their extreme operating conditions. There is an enormous opportunity for future application to a wide range of military and civilian mechanical components that operate in severe, corrosive environments.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 749.99K | Year: 2007

Critical large bearings in the F-35 thrust vector system must operate with absolute reliability under high loads, high heat and corrosive attack from salt air and fluorinated lubricant at elevated temperatures. A unique patented Filtered Arc Plasma Source Ion Deposition (FAPSID) process developed by Arcomac Surface Engineering will deposit an atomically bonded, multiple layered, integrated coating combining different metal and ceramic materials, each with specialized properties that improve both wear and corrosion resistance. This will further increase vector bearing performance, extend component life and reduce life cycle cost. Bearing components with optimized multiplex coating(s) will be rigorously evaluated for their durability and reliability under aggressive test conditions. The FAPSID process is scalable to produce production coatings on the large diameter bearing races in the F35 thrust vectoring system. These coatings have an enormous potential application to a wide range of military and civilian aircraft engine components that operate in severe wear and corrosive conditions.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 726.01K | Year: 2005

"Critical gears and engine bearings in our newest vertical thrust aircraft must operate with absolute reliability under high loads, high heat, corrosive salt air and intervals without lubricant. Current gear and bearing materials meet the design requirements, however, it is desirable to improve the component durability under unexpected severe operation (longer oil off) or extreme environmental (corrosive salt air)conditions. Advanced coatings possessing a combination of wear and corrosion resistance have a potential of extending component durability, and thus lowering life cycle costs. Now, a breakthrough in surface engineering technology can precisely control deposition of coatings at the level of vaporized atoms. It can deposit an atomically bonded, multiple layered, integrated coating combining different metal and ceramic materials, each with a different desired property. Engine parts with the multiplex coating(s)will be rigorously evaluated in this program for their durability and reliability under aggressive operating conditions. Such successful coatings have an enormous opportunity for future applications to a wide range of military and civilian aircraft engine components that operate in severe fretting or corrosive environment conditions.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 99.97K | Year: 2005

Current engine bearing lubrication technology begins to break down at the high rotation speeds, loads and temperatures required for advanced fighter engines. Furthermore, in combat operation bearings may have to operate for short periods with no lubrication, and also resist pervasive corrosive environments. In this program the bearing material will be modified to be "slippery", more durable, resist corrosion and hold lubricant evenly on the entire contact surface. This is possible because a breakthrough in surface engineering technology can precisely control deposition of coatings at the level of vaporized atoms. This innovative technology can deposit atomically bonded, multiple layered, nanocomposite coatings combined with engineered surface texturing in a single integrated tribo-system, so coated engine bearings will perform dependably under extreme operating conditions. There is an enormous opportunity for future applications to lubricate a wide range of military and civilian mechanical components that operate in severe environments.

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