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News Article | February 21, 2017
Site: www.rdmag.com

An international group of researchers have developed new methods utilizing digital fabrication in an effort to streamline architecture. During the American Association for the Advancement of Science 2017 Annual Meeting in Boston from Feb. 16-20, researchers from Switzerland, the U.S. and Australia showed the latest developments in digital fabrication in architecture at a 1:1 building scale. The research group showed that digital technologies can be successfully integrated in design, planning and building processes in order to successfully transform the building industry. Jonas Buchli, assistant professor for Agile and Dexterous Robotics at ETH Zurich in Switzerland and principal investigator in the Swiss National Centre of Competence in Research (NCCR) Digital Fabrication, proposed a radical focus on domain specific robotic technology, which would enable the use of digital fabrication directly on construction sites and in large scale prefabrication. Buchli brought a comprehensive and interdisciplinary approach that incorporates researchers from architecture, material science and robotics. During the meeting, Jane Burry, director of the Spatial Information Architecture Laboratory at RMIT University in Melbourne, Australia, explored how these opportunities for automation, optimization, variation, mass-customization and quality control can be fully realized in the built environment within full scale construction. Burry was able to show select digital fabrication examples, where research and innovation have changed construction practice. The majority of materials currently used in 3D printing were developed to print small scale objects. Ronald Rael, associate professor for Architecture at University of California, Berkeley, developed new materials that can overcome the challenges of scale and costs of 3D printing on 1:1 construction scale. He demonstrated that viable solutions for 3D printing in architecture could involve a material supply from sustainable resources, culled from waste streams or consideration of the efficiency of a building product’s digital materiality. Despite advances in technology, building processes still involve sub-standard working conditions and are not compellingly sustainable. Current research on the integration of digital technologies within construction focuses on making contributions to sustainability and productivity, while also enabling completely new forms of architectural expression. The multidisciplinary nature of integrating digital processes continues to be a challenge in establishing a digital building culture. To exploit the potential of digital fabrication, an institutional and funding environment that enables strong interdisciplinary research is required. Digital computation allows designers to move from the constraints of the static 2D and 3D representational techniques of drawing and physical modeling. Design attributes can be directly linked to extraneous factors including structural or environmental optimization or fabrication and material constraints. Mathematical design models contain sufficient information even for computer numerical controlled (CNC) fabrication machines and techniques.


News Article | February 17, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Many building processes still involve sub-standard working conditions and are not compellingly sustainable. Current research on the integration of digital technologies within construction processes promises substantial contributions to sustainability and productivity, while at the same time enabling completely new forms of architectural expression. The multidisciplinary nature of integrating digital processes remains a key challenge to establishing a digital building culture. In order to fully exploit the potential of digital fabrication, an institutional and funding environment that enables strong interdisciplinary research is required. Traditionally separated disciplines such as: architecture, structural design, computer science, materials science, control systems engineering, and robotics now need to form strong research connections. During the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting in Boston, Jonas Buchli, ETH Zurich - The Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich, Switzerland, Ronald Rael, University of California, Berkeley, U.S.A., and Jane Burry, RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia reveal the latest developments in digital fabrication in architecture at 1:1 building scale. In their presentations, they show digital technologies can be successfully integrated in design, planning, and building processes in order to successfully transform the building industry. Jonas Buchli, Assistant Professor for Agile and Dexterous Robotics at ETH Zurich in Switzerland and principal investigator in the Swiss National Centre of Competence in Research (NCCR) Digital Fabrication is proposing a radical focus on domain specific robotic technology enabling the use of digital fabrication directly on construction sites and in large scale prefabrication. He demonstrates how researchers at ETH Zurich within the NCCR Digital Fabrication - Switzerland's leading initiative for the development and integration of digital technologies within the field of architecture - are facing the challenge of developing this technology. They bring a comprehensive and interdisciplinary approach that incorporates researchers from architecture, materials science, and robotics. In his presentation, Buchli will provide insight into current research and the future vision and development of the In situ Fabricator, a mobile and versatile construction robot, which in 2017 will be utilized for the first time on an actual building site. Digital computation has freed designers from the constraints of the static 2- and 3- dimensional representational techniques of drawing and physical modelling. Design attributes can be directly linked to extraneous factors: structural or environmental optimization, or fabrication and material constraints. Mathematical design models contain sufficient information even for computer numerical controlled (CNC) fabrication ma-chines and techniques. Jane Burry, Director of the Spatial Information Architecture Laboratory at RMIT University in Melbourne, Australia, explores how these opportunities for automation, optimization, variation, mass-customization, and quality control can be fully realized in the built environment within full scale construction. Burry shows select digital fabrication examples, where research and innovation have changed construction practice. She will draw on prominent case studies such as the design and construction of Antonio Gaudí's Sagrada Familia. Most materials currently used in 3D printing, were developed to print small scale objects. Ronald Rael, Associate Professor for Architecture at University of California, Berkeley, U.S.A., reveals how he is developing new materials that can overcome the challenges of scale and costs of 3D printing on 1:1 construction scale. He demonstrates that viable solutions for 3D printing in architecture involve a material supply from sustainable resources, culled from waste streams or consideration of the efficiency of a building product's digital materiality. The methods of such architectural additive manufacturing must emerge from interdisciplinary research. "Digital Fabrication in Architecture - The Challenge to Transform the Building Industry" Friday, February 17th, 2017 3:00 - 4:30 PM, Room 206 Hynes Convention Center, Boston Additional images and video material available at:


News Article | February 18, 2017
Site: phys.org

In situ Fabricator (construction robot) is fabricating a doubly curved mesh structure during a fabrication test on the Empa NEST building in Duebendorf, Switzerland. Credit: Photo: NCCR Digital Fabrication and ETH Zurich Many building processes still involve sub-standard working conditions and are not compellingly sustainable. Current research on the integration of digital technologies within construction processes promises substantial contributions to sustainability and productivity, while at the same time enabling completely new forms of architectural expression. The multidisciplinary nature of integrating digital processes remains a key challenge to establishing a digital building culture. In order to fully exploit the potential of digital fabrication, an institutional and funding environment that enables strong interdisciplinary research is required. Traditionally separated disciplines such as: architecture, structural design, computer science, materials science, control systems engineering, and robotics now need to form strong research connections. During the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting in Boston, Jonas Buchli, ETH Zurich - The Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich, Switzerland, Ronald Rael, University of California, Berkeley, U.S.A., and Jane Burry, RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia reveal the latest developments in digital fabrication in architecture at 1:1 building scale. In their presentations, they show digital technologies can be successfully integrated in design, planning, and building processes in order to successfully transform the building industry. Jonas Buchli, Assistant Professor for Agile and Dexterous Robotics at ETH Zurich in Switzerland and principal investigator in the Swiss National Centre of Competence in Research (NCCR) Digital Fabrication is proposing a radical focus on domain specific robotic technology enabling the use of digital fabrication directly on construction sites and in large scale prefabrication. He demonstrates how researchers at ETH Zurich within the NCCR Digital Fabrication - Switzerland's leading initiative for the development and integration of digital technologies within the field of architecture - are facing the challenge of developing this technology. They bring a comprehensive and interdisciplinary approach that incorporates researchers from architecture, materials science, and robotics. In his presentation, Buchli will provide insight into current research and the future vision and development of the In situ Fabricator, a mobile and versatile construction robot, which in 2017 will be utilized for the first time on an actual building site. The New Mathematics of Making Digital computation has freed designers from the constraints of the static 2- and 3- dimensional representational techniques of drawing and physical modelling. Design attributes can be directly linked to extraneous factors: structural or environmental optimization, or fabrication and material constraints. Mathematical design models contain sufficient information even for computer numerical controlled (CNC) fabrication ma-chines and techniques. Jane Burry, Director of the Spatial Information Architecture Laboratory at RMIT University in Melbourne, Australia, explores how these opportunities for automation, optimization, variation, mass-customization, and quality control can be fully realized in the built environment within full scale construction. Burry shows select digital fabrication examples, where research and innovation have changed construction practice. She will draw on prominent case studies such as the design and construction of Antonio Gaudí's Sagrada Familia. Most materials currently used in 3D printing, were developed to print small scale objects. Ronald Rael, Associate Professor for Architecture at University of California, Berkeley, U.S.A., reveals how he is developing new materials that can overcome the challenges of scale and costs of 3D printing on 1:1 construction scale. He demonstrates that viable solutions for 3D printing in architecture involve a material supply from sustainable resources, culled from waste streams or consideration of the efficiency of a building product's digital materiality. The methods of such architectural additive manufacturing must emerge from interdisciplinary research.


Suzuki T.,United Information Technology | Muto M.,United Information Technology | Yamamoto M.,Architecture Laboratory
Quarterly Report of RTRI (Railway Technical Research Institute) | Year: 2014

This research aims to establish a method for evaluating the convenience of rail to bus transfer routes, focusing on physical and structural characteristics. An online survey was conducted to obtain passenger opinion about rail to bus transfer convenience. With the data obtained, a model was developed to evaluate the convenience in making such transfers, in order to quantify the effect of physical characteristics of transfer routes on such an evaluation. Besides horizontal walking distances, use of stairs, features outside stations, including safety concerns and bus stop structures, were also considered. The developed models were then applied to a sample case to demonstrate how transfer convenience can be evaluated in practice.


Yamada S.,Architecture Laboratory | Shimizu K.,Architecture Laboratory | Takei Y.,R and D Planning
Quarterly Report of RTRI (Railway Technical Research Institute) (Japan) | Year: 2011

The study presented in this paper verifies the seismic retrofitting effects of reinforcing over-track buildings with knee-brace dampers. Firstly shaking table tests were carried out on large-scale test models, to simulate over-track buildings reinforced with knee-brace dampers. Resulting responses or hysteresis loops, confirmed the seismic retrofitting effects of knee-brace dampers. In addition, natural frequencies and damping factors of the models were estimated by ARX model. Furthermore, analytical study of over-track building models simulating true structures confirmed the seismic retrofitting effects of kneebrace dampers.


Yokoyama H.,Geology Laboratory | Izumi Y.,Architecture Laboratory | Watanabe T.,Structural Mechanics Laboratory
Quarterly Report of RTRI (Railway Technical Research Institute) | Year: 2016

The analysis of the whole model of train-induced vibration, which consists of the moving train, the track, the supporting infrastructure, the ground, and the building, is currently too large to solve. We thus proposed a numerical simulation method by combining two separate dynamic analysis models. One is an analysis model of the dynamic interaction between the moving train and the track-structure system for calculating excitation force. The other is a three dimensional dynamic analysis model of the supporting structure, the ground, and the building for calculating the propagation of vibration. © 2016, Ken-yusha Inc. All rights reserved.


Suzuki H.,Science Division Human | Fujinami K.,Ergonomics Laboratory | Izumi Y.,Architecture Laboratory
Quarterly Report of RTRI (Railway Technical Research Institute) (Japan) | Year: 2011

"Human simulation" has been one of the major keywords in recent human science studies. This paper reviews human simulation methods applied to railway ergonomics. One type of simulator uses virtual reality technology to simulate an environment, such as Driving Simulators, Ride Comfort Simulators and Railway Station Simulators. Another type uses computer simulations to deal with topics such as (i) evaluating the mental workload experienced by train drivers and (ii) motion patterns of passengers and injuries caused by train collisions.


Yamamoto M.,Architecture Laboratory | Ishizuki M.,Architecture Laboratory | Aoki T.,JR Affairs
Quarterly Report of RTRI (Railway Technical Research Institute) (Japan) | Year: 2010

Stations are normally congested during rush hour periods. In recent years, the number of complex stations that include commercial facilities has increased, and the nature of passenger traffic lines at stations has become increasingly diversified. It has therefore become more important to consider comfortable walking conditions for passengers when planning stations. Although the authors previously clarified passenger flow at a station using simulation technology, there was no established technique to evaluate the degree of discomfort passengers experience during conditions of congestion. Accordingly, efforts were made to clarify the relationship between the degree of congestion and passenger discomfort. In this study, repeated walking experiments and monitor-based evaluation tests were performed using a mock-up station (referred to as a station simulator). The results provided indicators that could be used to evaluate the degree of discomfort passengers feel and to improve existing passenger flow simulation.

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