Architectural Association, London

London, United Kingdom

Architectural Association, London

London, United Kingdom

The Architectural Association School of Architecture in London, commonly referred to as the AA, is the oldest independent school of architecture in the UK and one of the most prestigious and competitive in the world. Its wide-ranging programme of exhibitions, lectures, symposia and publications have given it a central position in global discussions and developments within contemporary architectural culture. Wikipedia.

SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Crossley T.,Architectural Association, London
FTC 2016 - Proceedings of Future Technologies Conference | Year: 2016

Architecture defines relationships between bodies and space. It is through these relationships that object-subject hierarchies form, effecting human behavior and habitus1. It follows that, by manipulating perception, architecture re-orients or disorients object-subject relationships and breaks down social habitus by first breaking down the initial body image. The continuing research studies how immersive design can be used as a supportive tool in shaping 'normal experience' to create extended notions of body image and new understandings of space and place. It examines how immersion can create a feeling of collectivity. 'Normal experience' limits and frames our perceptions through arbitrarily assigned social lenses in ways that immersive experience can reflect upon and dissect. Furthermore, while habitus and identity have positive attributes of cultural unity, there is a negative side to them that differentiates people, which is not intrinsically a problem but becomes the material that hostility feeds. Therefore, greater empathy can be created by these alternative understandings of space and one's identity within it and other bodies. © 2016 IEEE.


Erdine E.,Architectural Association, London | Kallegias A.,Architectural Association, London
Design Studies | Year: 2017

This paper addresses techniques directed towards the integration of form, structure, and composite material systems through a series of computational tools acting in correlation with digital fabrication processes for the realization of one-to-one scale, reinforced concrete architectural prototypes, designed and produced during the Architectural Association Summer DLAB Visiting Schools 2014 and 2016. The case studies investigate concrete and its inherent fluid materiality through generative form-finding methods, Finite Element Analysis, and various digital fabrication processes including robotic fabrication protocols. The paper highlights the integration of parametric design techniques with basic and advanced techniques of construction, moving away from conventional hierarchies prescribed by design, analysis, and fabrication as a linear model towards a unified model of design and production. © 2017 Elsevier Ltd.


Spencer D.,Architectural Association, London
Journal of Architecture | Year: 2010

'With Blade Runner's replicants, circulating capital achieves its highest form and real subsumption attains its ultimate stage of development: the replicants become the privileged objects of society's intelligence.'1 The term 'replicant', drawn from the 1982 film Blade Runner directed by Ridley Scott, is used here to conceptualise the 'urbanism' produced within the Central Building designed by Zaha Hadid Architects for BMW's plant at Leipzig in 2005. It is used not so as to critique the project's urban dimension as fake, but to propose that it is, like the humanoid replicants of the film, a new reality produced by corporate capital designed to function in its service as an improved version of the original from which it is derived.2 This proposition is developed through an analysis of the models of labour organisation currently utilised within managerial practice, and the confluence of its concerns with those of certain currents in contemporary architecture. The BMW Central Building is also analysed in the economic and political contexts of the plant's specific location, and with reference to the architectural means through which it has been designed to replicate and instrumentalise urban organisational patterns for the corporation. © 2010 The Journal of Architecture.


Spencer D.,Architectural Association, London
Journal of Architecture | Year: 2016

‘With Blade Runner’s replicants, circulating capital achieves its highest form and real subsumption attains its ultimate stage of development: the replicants become the privileged objects of society’s intelligence.’1 The term ‘replicant’, drawn from the 1982 film Blade Runner directed by Ridley Scott, is used here to conceptualise the ‘urbanism’ produced within the Central Building designed by Zaha Hadid Architects for BMW’s plant at Leipzig in 2005. It is used not so as to critique the project’s urban dimension as fake, but to propose that it is, like the humanoid replicants of the film, a new reality produced by corporate capital designed to function in its service as an improved version of the original from which it is derived.2 This proposition is developed through an analysis of the models of labour organisation currently utilised within managerial practice, and the confluence of its concerns with those of certain currents in contemporary architecture. The BMW Central Building is also analysed in the economic and political contexts of the plant’s specific location, and with reference to the architectural means through which it has been designed to replicate and instrumentalise urban organisational patterns for the corporation. © 2010 The Journal of Architecture.


Jacoby S.,Architectural Association, London
Journal of Architecture | Year: 2015

The twentieth-century accounts of typology are often both historiographically problematic and conceptually imprecise. They reinforce an understanding of typology as mainly an interchangeable functional and graphic classification, and present Jean-Nicolas-Louis Durand as a key figure of the discourse, despite him dealing with buildings according to their genre and not their organisational and structural diagrams of typology. In contrast, one can posit that all theories of type are foremost epistemological and discursive arguments. Although not prescriptive in a formal sense, they are concerned with a rational synthesis of form by thinking through conceptual and diagrammatic organisation. This diagrammatic abstraction had already become instrumental to architectural theory and history in the eighteenth century, long before the modern discourse on the diagram was consolidated in the 1990s.While the architectural diagram is regularly explained as a generic and generative description, it can equally be defined as a typological diagram specific to the architectural discipline and its production of knowledge. Clarifying the concept of type as emerging in parallel with ideas of abstraction and diagrammatic reasoning reveals a richer set of connected problems deriving from architectural practice, pedagogy and disciplinary knowledge, which permits a different framing of the historical discourse. This is explored by discussing its meaning for a distinction between typal and typological reasoning, how this arises from a problem of history and theory, and how the evolving typological discourse relates to the concepts of invention, disposition and style. Whereas historiography commonly recognises the French academics Antoine-Chrysostome Quatremère de Quincy and Durand, the often-overlooked Gottfried Semper and Julien-David Le Roy were central to a modern conception of architecture that developed ideas of typal and typological abstraction through historicist processes of cultural and diagrammatic reduction. © 2015 RIBA Enterprises.


Sun F.,Architectural Association, London
Energy and Buildings | Year: 2013

The rapid economic expansion of China has been accompanied by environmental issues that have necessitated a national energy conservation strategy. It has become apparent that more resources must be made available for a national programme of developing sustainable buildings with an energy-saving capability. This paper discusses how to achieve space heating and cooling as low as possible in the Chinese residual context, where three main issues need to be addressed: (1) climate variations - there are five different climatic regions partitioned by the Chinese authorities as severe cold region, cold region, moderate region, hot summer and cold winter region, and hot summer and mild winter region; (2) rigid building form - multi-storey building block is the most constructed during the construction boom last decade resulting from the application of the national building regulations; (3) favoured fenestration design due to viewing purpose. This paper investigates the window size in relation to its corresponding annual space heating and cooling demand within the five different climatic regions. It quantifies the energy savings by energy-efficient measures in a step-by-step approach from the current representative scenario to the building regulative scenario and finally reaches the optimized scenario and concludes guidance for future energy-efficient residential building designs. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


Koh I.,Architectural Association, London
Rethinking Comprehensive Design: Speculative Counterculture - Proceedings of the 19th International Conference on Computer-Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia, CAADRIA 2014 | Year: 2014

This paper aims to investigate the ways in which the traditional processes of glass-blowing techniques could be incorporated with contemporary generative design processes in the realization of new novel architectural systems. Pedagogical issues on how such prototyping processes could be better integrated within architectural education are also discussed. With the use of algorithmic design methodology to generate/visualize the components assembled in multitudes and digital fabrication machineries to produce the necessary moulds/jigs/tools/connection joints, a series of 5 different glass prototypes have been actualized at the scale of 1:1 or otherwise. The work is the direct outcome of a new programme founded and directed by the author as part of the Architectural Association (AA) School of Architecture' s Visiting School in 2013. Part 1 briefly introduces the specific agenda and how the corresponding structure of the programme is designed to facilitate the glass research work done concurrently at the digital fabrication laboratory and glass-blowing studio. Part 2 would systematically discuss in detail the design of each of the 5 main glass prototypes made, presented alongside photographs and diagrams to illustrate the prototypes' respective assembly and fabrication logics. Part 3 would evaluate the work done and project plans for the next iteration of the research in 2014. © 2014, The Association for Computer-Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia (CAADRIA), Hong Kong.


Between mid-nineteenth and early twentieth century, London underwent a radical social and spatial transformation to become a modern city. A key part of this transformation process is a gendered division of the city related to a progressive implementation of evangelical moral codes prevailing in the society of that time. However, between 1859 and 1914, a group of women broke these divisions through different mechanisms of action to reclaim both a place in the urban public sphere and their citizen rights. Among these mechanisms, there is a strategy of infiltration in this male town that is implemented through a progressive opening of spaces of association. The progressive opening of women's clubs and associations consolidated a solid relational network that subsequently is disclosed in large suffragette's marches in the public space in the early twentieth century. Through this first network of places, a parallel city of women is evidenced and defined by alternative city maps, which, however, would be later long marginalized by modern historiography. © EDITORIAL UNIVERSIDAD DE SEVILLA.


Schiano-Phan R.,Architectural Association, London
Architectural Science Review | Year: 2012

In the past 20 years, passive downdraught evaporative cooling (PDEC) has been proven as a viable alternative to conventional mechanical cooling in buildings. Following the theoretical and experimental work by Givoni, in Israel and by Cunningham and Thompson, in Arizona, a number of pioneering buildings adopting this innovative technique have emerged around the world. These first-generation buildings demonstrate the technical applicability of PDEC as part of a climatically responsive approach to design and to the provision of comfort. However, many questions arise on the design implications of a PDEC building and specifically on the relationship between system performance, architectural integration and occupants perception. Four case study buildings using PDEC were identified in the states of Arizona, Utah and California, for which a post-occupancy study was undertaken by the author, as part of a dissemination project supported by the European Commission and completed in 2010. These buildings use various PDEC system typologies and approaches to building integration. This article reports on the outcome of this study, which has shown that the success of a PDEC system is often related to the ability of the designers to anticipate the implications for the users of their buildings (i.e. building integration) and to the robustness of the overall passive design strategy. The study also showed that the occupants perception of such buildings is influenced by their expectations (pre-conditioning) and by their ability to control their surrounding environment. © 2012 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.


Barakat M.A.,Architectural Association, London
Simulation Series | Year: 2015

This paper is part of an ongoing research investigating the potential for creating a tool that integrates the theoretical spatial and soundscape design connections, to aid spatial designers when considering sound as a primary driver for urban design. The investigation is founded on establishing a relationship between aural architecture theories and the urban spatial experience and design. It also explores the merging of spatial and acoustical computational approaches, through integrating the physical/mathematical representation of sound to the mapping of the spatial envelopes and phenomena of human aural responses. The intent is the development and calibration of a computational design and decision-aiding tool that can predict qualitative patterns of aural spatial perception, and translate them into spatial attributes within a modeled urban space. The tool combines known urban modeling techniques with established acoustic simulation methods to produce qualitative aural spatial patterns that can aid architects (urban and event designer) to incorporate acoustic sensory manipulation during the preliminary design phase. © 2015 Society for Modeling & Simulation International (SCS).

Loading Architectural Association, London collaborators
Loading Architectural Association, London collaborators