London, United Kingdom
London, United Kingdom

Arcadis NV is a global design, engineering and management consulting company based in the Zuidas, Amsterdam, Netherlands. It has its origins in 1868. The company is a member of the Next 150 index.Arcadis has over 300 offices in 40 countries. Wikipedia.

SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

News Article | May 23, 2017
Site: www.enr.com

Efforts are underway in Louisiana to determine the possible impacts and new requirements for highway infrastructure that may result should the use of connected and autonomous vehicles (CAVs) grow. Louisiana’s Dept. of Transportation and Development (DOTD) announced that it has contracted Arcadis U.S. Inc. to provide technical support services and facilitate planning activities related to connected and autonomous vehicles and their impact on highway infrastructure. The purpose of the project is to keep the DOTD up to date on industry trends while also preparing the state for possible changes in future transportation. “Louisiana is one of a handful of states looking at CAV technology,” explains Akhil Chauhan, vice president of transportation services with Arcadis, Baton Rouge, who is working directly with the DOTD. “Other states like Florida, Texas, Michigan, Virginia, California and Arizona are also starting to plan but it’s not widely adopted yet across the country. It’s gaining momentum each year but is still a fairly new pursuit for state DOTs.” This multi-year, $2 million contract has Arcadis developing a strategic implementation plan for CAV implementation with the DOTD and performing intelligent transportation systems (ITS) architectures and system engineering analysis for CAVs. Chauhan explains that “CAVs communicate with infrastructure using roadside units using DSRC radio waves (dedicated short-range communications). In comparison, cell phone signals typically have a longer latency on information transfer and are not as desirable for two-way, instant, vehicle-to-infrastructure and vehicle-to-vehicle communications.” This would require states that have CAVs on their roads to install roadside units to support them. “Also, the roadway support infrastructure will change. For instance, there will be a huge impact on parking garages and outlying lots,” Chauhan adds. “An autonomous car can drive you to work or the airport and go park itself back home or at an outlying lot. We’re already seeing parking garages in cities like Boston designed with spaces between columns and beams for future conversion into residential or commercial units.” Furthermore, interstate and highway lanes could potentially be narrowed from the standard 12-ft width to 10-ft, resulting in a smaller infrastructure footprint, he notes. “These are just some of the clear impacts CAVs will have on roadway infrastructure design,” Chauhan says. While it’s unclear when exactly CAVs will be prevalent on roads across the country, Chauhan notes that each state will certainly follow a different timeline. Public agencies will have to lead the use of CAVs, and stakeholders are waiting for the U.S. Dept. of Transportation to adopt its final policies that will ultimately guide state adoption and deployment, Chauhan adds. “Some states have already started test deployments and demonstrations of CAV technologies. Once they realize the potential and see the broad impacts, then you’ll see changes to government processes and policies,” he says. “We anticipate states will be fully engaged with AVs by 2030. That’s less than 15 years, so state and regional governments will want to start planning now. It takes time to design and implement the infrastructure, find funding, change public policies and adopt new technologies.” As part of the project, Arcadis will also analyze emerging technologies in roadway infrastructure, such as vehicle-to-vehicle communications and Dedicated Short Range Communications (DSRC) frequencies.


HIGHLANDS RANCH, Colo., June 08, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- More than half of water utility leaders globally have yet to embrace innovation and risk missing out on important “sustainability dividends,” according to a new Arcadis report, Empowering Water Utility Innovation. Arcadis, the leading global design and consultancy firm for natural and built assets, unveiled the report in advance of the annual American Water Works Association’s Annual Conference & Exposition in Philadelphia June 11-15. Arcadis surveyed 423 utility professionals across 82 urban water utilities and discovered that only 40 percent engage innovation as a business practice. Yet more than 90 percent of respondents said it is critical to the future of their utility. In the report, Jason Carter, Delivery and Innovation Lead for Arcadis North America, reveals how innovation generates measurable ROI while resulting in social, environmental and economic benefits. These benefits strengthen a utility’s brand, bottom line and satisfaction ratings to ultimately improve quality of life for its customers. The report further points to innovations such as stormwater harvesting, advanced metering and real-time system monitoring as pathways to generating sustainability dividends. These dividends equate to greater revenue capture, improved demand management, waste reduction or increased asset longevity, to name a few. Carter explains, “By building a culture of creativity, investment, experimentation and incubation, utilities can deploy innovation to foster new approaches to serving customers, managing facilities and funding infrastructure improvements. Innovation enables utilities to effectively engage internal and external resources to continuously improve operations and increase value for their customers through improved system resiliency, efficiency and quality, the three elements of water sustainability. Ultimately, it is innovation that leads to sustainability dividends.” The report provides a “Utility Innovation Framework,” which comprises eight disciplines for creating a culture of innovation, such as focusing on defining challenges that guide investment, engaging stakeholders in transformative programs, reaching out to external resources and communicating success. The Arcadis report builds on a 190-page industry guidance manual, “Fostering Innovation Within Water Utilities,” which was recently published by the Water Research Foundation (WRF) and Water Environment & Reuse Foundation (WE&RF) with Carter as the principal investigator. The Arcadis report also provides several case studies, including how three utilities embraced innovation to reap sustainability dividends. Innovation: Ultrasonic algae control – American Water, a utility headquartered in Voorhees, New Jersey, piloted new technologies to drive improvements. The utility tested four ultrasonic algae control units in a reservoir in New Jersey, allowing a nearby reservoir to serve as a control. The six-month evaluation delivered sustainability dividends by showing effective control of the algae growth and no evidence of taste or odor problems or algal toxins. An economic assessment revealed the units saved approximately $87,800 in operational costs, with a projected payback time of 1.8 years for the system. Innovation: Real time intelligence – According to the WRF/WE&RF guidance manual, Toronto Water used real-time intelligence from smart systems to control energy cost variations, planned/unplanned equipment downtime and demand/storage variations for greater system resilience. Sustainability dividends were achieved with cost savings from power projected at US $1.2 million, and more coming from optimizing variable spot market energy rates. Innovation: Intelligent water networks – Florida’s Jacksonville Energy Authority water division is using acoustic sensing technology to digitally assess pipe conditions, according to the WRF/WE&RF guidance manual. The utility uses an intelligent water network to deploy robust sensors into the network to generate actionable data while allowing for monitoring and actively managing performance in real time. This ability to accurately identify problems and immediately respond helps utilities target resources while providing sustainability dividends like eliminating outages and sewer flooding. About Arcadis Arcadis is the leading global design & consultancy firm for natural and built assets. Applying our deep market sector insights and collective design, consultancy, engineering, project and management services, we work in partnership with our clients to deliver exceptional and sustainable outcomes throughout the lifecycle of their natural and built assets. We are 27,000 people active in over 70 countries that generate more than $3.5 billion in revenues. Visit Arcadis.com


HIGHLANDS RANCH, Colo., June 08, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- More than half of water utility leaders globally have yet to embrace innovation and risk missing out on important “sustainability dividends,” according to a new Arcadis report, Empowering Water Utility Innovation. Arcadis, the leading global design and consultancy firm for natural and built assets, unveiled the report in advance of the annual American Water Works Association’s Annual Conference & Exposition in Philadelphia June 11-15. Arcadis surveyed 423 utility professionals across 82 urban water utilities and discovered that only 40 percent engage innovation as a business practice. Yet more than 90 percent of respondents said it is critical to the future of their utility. In the report, Jason Carter, Delivery and Innovation Lead for Arcadis North America, reveals how innovation generates measurable ROI while resulting in social, environmental and economic benefits. These benefits strengthen a utility’s brand, bottom line and satisfaction ratings to ultimately improve quality of life for its customers. The report further points to innovations such as stormwater harvesting, advanced metering and real-time system monitoring as pathways to generating sustainability dividends. These dividends equate to greater revenue capture, improved demand management, waste reduction or increased asset longevity, to name a few. Carter explains, “By building a culture of creativity, investment, experimentation and incubation, utilities can deploy innovation to foster new approaches to serving customers, managing facilities and funding infrastructure improvements. Innovation enables utilities to effectively engage internal and external resources to continuously improve operations and increase value for their customers through improved system resiliency, efficiency and quality, the three elements of water sustainability. Ultimately, it is innovation that leads to sustainability dividends.” The report provides a “Utility Innovation Framework,” which comprises eight disciplines for creating a culture of innovation, such as focusing on defining challenges that guide investment, engaging stakeholders in transformative programs, reaching out to external resources and communicating success. The Arcadis report builds on a 190-page industry guidance manual, “Fostering Innovation Within Water Utilities,” which was recently published by the Water Research Foundation (WRF) and Water Environment & Reuse Foundation (WE&RF) with Carter as the principal investigator. The Arcadis report also provides several case studies, including how three utilities embraced innovation to reap sustainability dividends. Innovation: Ultrasonic algae control – American Water, a utility headquartered in Voorhees, New Jersey, piloted new technologies to drive improvements. The utility tested four ultrasonic algae control units in a reservoir in New Jersey, allowing a nearby reservoir to serve as a control. The six-month evaluation delivered sustainability dividends by showing effective control of the algae growth and no evidence of taste or odor problems or algal toxins. An economic assessment revealed the units saved approximately $87,800 in operational costs, with a projected payback time of 1.8 years for the system. Innovation: Real time intelligence – According to the WRF/WE&RF guidance manual, Toronto Water used real-time intelligence from smart systems to control energy cost variations, planned/unplanned equipment downtime and demand/storage variations for greater system resilience. Sustainability dividends were achieved with cost savings from power projected at US $1.2 million, and more coming from optimizing variable spot market energy rates. Innovation: Intelligent water networks – Florida’s Jacksonville Energy Authority water division is using acoustic sensing technology to digitally assess pipe conditions, according to the WRF/WE&RF guidance manual. The utility uses an intelligent water network to deploy robust sensors into the network to generate actionable data while allowing for monitoring and actively managing performance in real time. This ability to accurately identify problems and immediately respond helps utilities target resources while providing sustainability dividends like eliminating outages and sewer flooding. About Arcadis Arcadis is the leading global design & consultancy firm for natural and built assets. Applying our deep market sector insights and collective design, consultancy, engineering, project and management services, we work in partnership with our clients to deliver exceptional and sustainable outcomes throughout the lifecycle of their natural and built assets. We are 27,000 people active in over 70 countries that generate more than $3.5 billion in revenues. Visit Arcadis.com


HIGHLANDS RANCH, Colo., June 08, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- More than half of water utility leaders globally have yet to embrace innovation and risk missing out on important “sustainability dividends,” according to a new Arcadis report, Empowering Water Utility Innovation. Arcadis, the leading global design and consultancy firm for natural and built assets, unveiled the report in advance of the annual American Water Works Association’s Annual Conference & Exposition in Philadelphia June 11-15. Arcadis surveyed 423 utility professionals across 82 urban water utilities and discovered that only 40 percent engage innovation as a business practice. Yet more than 90 percent of respondents said it is critical to the future of their utility. In the report, Jason Carter, Delivery and Innovation Lead for Arcadis North America, reveals how innovation generates measurable ROI while resulting in social, environmental and economic benefits. These benefits strengthen a utility’s brand, bottom line and satisfaction ratings to ultimately improve quality of life for its customers. The report further points to innovations such as stormwater harvesting, advanced metering and real-time system monitoring as pathways to generating sustainability dividends. These dividends equate to greater revenue capture, improved demand management, waste reduction or increased asset longevity, to name a few. Carter explains, “By building a culture of creativity, investment, experimentation and incubation, utilities can deploy innovation to foster new approaches to serving customers, managing facilities and funding infrastructure improvements. Innovation enables utilities to effectively engage internal and external resources to continuously improve operations and increase value for their customers through improved system resiliency, efficiency and quality, the three elements of water sustainability. Ultimately, it is innovation that leads to sustainability dividends.” The report provides a “Utility Innovation Framework,” which comprises eight disciplines for creating a culture of innovation, such as focusing on defining challenges that guide investment, engaging stakeholders in transformative programs, reaching out to external resources and communicating success. The Arcadis report builds on a 190-page industry guidance manual, “Fostering Innovation Within Water Utilities,” which was recently published by the Water Research Foundation (WRF) and Water Environment & Reuse Foundation (WE&RF) with Carter as the principal investigator. The Arcadis report also provides several case studies, including how three utilities embraced innovation to reap sustainability dividends. Innovation: Ultrasonic algae control – American Water, a utility headquartered in Voorhees, New Jersey, piloted new technologies to drive improvements. The utility tested four ultrasonic algae control units in a reservoir in New Jersey, allowing a nearby reservoir to serve as a control. The six-month evaluation delivered sustainability dividends by showing effective control of the algae growth and no evidence of taste or odor problems or algal toxins. An economic assessment revealed the units saved approximately $87,800 in operational costs, with a projected payback time of 1.8 years for the system. Innovation: Real time intelligence – According to the WRF/WE&RF guidance manual, Toronto Water used real-time intelligence from smart systems to control energy cost variations, planned/unplanned equipment downtime and demand/storage variations for greater system resilience. Sustainability dividends were achieved with cost savings from power projected at US $1.2 million, and more coming from optimizing variable spot market energy rates. Innovation: Intelligent water networks – Florida’s Jacksonville Energy Authority water division is using acoustic sensing technology to digitally assess pipe conditions, according to the WRF/WE&RF guidance manual. The utility uses an intelligent water network to deploy robust sensors into the network to generate actionable data while allowing for monitoring and actively managing performance in real time. This ability to accurately identify problems and immediately respond helps utilities target resources while providing sustainability dividends like eliminating outages and sewer flooding. About Arcadis Arcadis is the leading global design & consultancy firm for natural and built assets. Applying our deep market sector insights and collective design, consultancy, engineering, project and management services, we work in partnership with our clients to deliver exceptional and sustainable outcomes throughout the lifecycle of their natural and built assets. We are 27,000 people active in over 70 countries that generate more than $3.5 billion in revenues. Visit Arcadis.com


HIGHLANDS RANCH, Colo., June 08, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- More than half of water utility leaders globally have yet to embrace innovation and risk missing out on important “sustainability dividends,” according to a new Arcadis report, Empowering Water Utility Innovation. Arcadis, the leading global design and consultancy firm for natural and built assets, unveiled the report in advance of the annual American Water Works Association’s Annual Conference & Exposition in Philadelphia June 11-15. Arcadis surveyed 423 utility professionals across 82 urban water utilities and discovered that only 40 percent engage innovation as a business practice. Yet more than 90 percent of respondents said it is critical to the future of their utility. In the report, Jason Carter, Delivery and Innovation Lead for Arcadis North America, reveals how innovation generates measurable ROI while resulting in social, environmental and economic benefits. These benefits strengthen a utility’s brand, bottom line and satisfaction ratings to ultimately improve quality of life for its customers. The report further points to innovations such as stormwater harvesting, advanced metering and real-time system monitoring as pathways to generating sustainability dividends. These dividends equate to greater revenue capture, improved demand management, waste reduction or increased asset longevity, to name a few. Carter explains, “By building a culture of creativity, investment, experimentation and incubation, utilities can deploy innovation to foster new approaches to serving customers, managing facilities and funding infrastructure improvements. Innovation enables utilities to effectively engage internal and external resources to continuously improve operations and increase value for their customers through improved system resiliency, efficiency and quality, the three elements of water sustainability. Ultimately, it is innovation that leads to sustainability dividends.” The report provides a “Utility Innovation Framework,” which comprises eight disciplines for creating a culture of innovation, such as focusing on defining challenges that guide investment, engaging stakeholders in transformative programs, reaching out to external resources and communicating success. The Arcadis report builds on a 190-page industry guidance manual, “Fostering Innovation Within Water Utilities,” which was recently published by the Water Research Foundation (WRF) and Water Environment & Reuse Foundation (WE&RF) with Carter as the principal investigator. The Arcadis report also provides several case studies, including how three utilities embraced innovation to reap sustainability dividends. Innovation: Ultrasonic algae control – American Water, a utility headquartered in Voorhees, New Jersey, piloted new technologies to drive improvements. The utility tested four ultrasonic algae control units in a reservoir in New Jersey, allowing a nearby reservoir to serve as a control. The six-month evaluation delivered sustainability dividends by showing effective control of the algae growth and no evidence of taste or odor problems or algal toxins. An economic assessment revealed the units saved approximately $87,800 in operational costs, with a projected payback time of 1.8 years for the system. Innovation: Real time intelligence – According to the WRF/WE&RF guidance manual, Toronto Water used real-time intelligence from smart systems to control energy cost variations, planned/unplanned equipment downtime and demand/storage variations for greater system resilience. Sustainability dividends were achieved with cost savings from power projected at US $1.2 million, and more coming from optimizing variable spot market energy rates. Innovation: Intelligent water networks – Florida’s Jacksonville Energy Authority water division is using acoustic sensing technology to digitally assess pipe conditions, according to the WRF/WE&RF guidance manual. The utility uses an intelligent water network to deploy robust sensors into the network to generate actionable data while allowing for monitoring and actively managing performance in real time. This ability to accurately identify problems and immediately respond helps utilities target resources while providing sustainability dividends like eliminating outages and sewer flooding. About Arcadis Arcadis is the leading global design & consultancy firm for natural and built assets. Applying our deep market sector insights and collective design, consultancy, engineering, project and management services, we work in partnership with our clients to deliver exceptional and sustainable outcomes throughout the lifecycle of their natural and built assets. We are 27,000 people active in over 70 countries that generate more than $3.5 billion in revenues. Visit Arcadis.com


HIGHLANDS RANCH, Colo., June 08, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- More than half of water utility leaders globally have yet to embrace innovation and risk missing out on important “sustainability dividends,” according to a new Arcadis report, Empowering Water Utility Innovation. Arcadis, the leading global design and consultancy firm for natural and built assets, unveiled the report in advance of the annual American Water Works Association’s Annual Conference & Exposition in Philadelphia June 11-15. Arcadis surveyed 423 utility professionals across 82 urban water utilities and discovered that only 40 percent engage innovation as a business practice. Yet more than 90 percent of respondents said it is critical to the future of their utility. In the report, Jason Carter, Delivery and Innovation Lead for Arcadis North America, reveals how innovation generates measurable ROI while resulting in social, environmental and economic benefits. These benefits strengthen a utility’s brand, bottom line and satisfaction ratings to ultimately improve quality of life for its customers. The report further points to innovations such as stormwater harvesting, advanced metering and real-time system monitoring as pathways to generating sustainability dividends. These dividends equate to greater revenue capture, improved demand management, waste reduction or increased asset longevity, to name a few. Carter explains, “By building a culture of creativity, investment, experimentation and incubation, utilities can deploy innovation to foster new approaches to serving customers, managing facilities and funding infrastructure improvements. Innovation enables utilities to effectively engage internal and external resources to continuously improve operations and increase value for their customers through improved system resiliency, efficiency and quality, the three elements of water sustainability. Ultimately, it is innovation that leads to sustainability dividends.” The report provides a “Utility Innovation Framework,” which comprises eight disciplines for creating a culture of innovation, such as focusing on defining challenges that guide investment, engaging stakeholders in transformative programs, reaching out to external resources and communicating success. The Arcadis report builds on a 190-page industry guidance manual, “Fostering Innovation Within Water Utilities,” which was recently published by the Water Research Foundation (WRF) and Water Environment & Reuse Foundation (WE&RF) with Carter as the principal investigator. The Arcadis report also provides several case studies, including how three utilities embraced innovation to reap sustainability dividends. Innovation: Ultrasonic algae control – American Water, a utility headquartered in Voorhees, New Jersey, piloted new technologies to drive improvements. The utility tested four ultrasonic algae control units in a reservoir in New Jersey, allowing a nearby reservoir to serve as a control. The six-month evaluation delivered sustainability dividends by showing effective control of the algae growth and no evidence of taste or odor problems or algal toxins. An economic assessment revealed the units saved approximately $87,800 in operational costs, with a projected payback time of 1.8 years for the system. Innovation: Real time intelligence – According to the WRF/WE&RF guidance manual, Toronto Water used real-time intelligence from smart systems to control energy cost variations, planned/unplanned equipment downtime and demand/storage variations for greater system resilience. Sustainability dividends were achieved with cost savings from power projected at US $1.2 million, and more coming from optimizing variable spot market energy rates. Innovation: Intelligent water networks – Florida’s Jacksonville Energy Authority water division is using acoustic sensing technology to digitally assess pipe conditions, according to the WRF/WE&RF guidance manual. The utility uses an intelligent water network to deploy robust sensors into the network to generate actionable data while allowing for monitoring and actively managing performance in real time. This ability to accurately identify problems and immediately respond helps utilities target resources while providing sustainability dividends like eliminating outages and sewer flooding. About Arcadis Arcadis is the leading global design & consultancy firm for natural and built assets. Applying our deep market sector insights and collective design, consultancy, engineering, project and management services, we work in partnership with our clients to deliver exceptional and sustainable outcomes throughout the lifecycle of their natural and built assets. We are 27,000 people active in over 70 countries that generate more than $3.5 billion in revenues. Visit Arcadis.com


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: SEC-2012.2.1-1 | Award Amount: 5.29M | Year: 2013

The overall objective of the ELASSTIC project is to improve the security and resilience of large scale multifunctional building complexes to natural and man-made disasters by providing a methodology and tools which enable to include security and resilience from the early design and planning phase of such projects. The ELASSTIC concept proposed is based upon the following key features: 1) A comprehensive approach for designing safe, secure and resilient large scale built infrastructures 2) A set of tools to enable architects, structural engineers and building installation engineers to assess the safety, security and resilience of designs and to optimize the integral design 3) Coupling and integration of these tools into Building Information Modelling (BIM) technology resulting in extended BIM technology (BIM\) 4) Smart and reinforced building elements, to measure the actual building condition combined with an increased bearing capacity and resistance 5) Coupling and integration of BIM and BMS (Building Management System) 6) Real time information on the safety, security and resilience of infrastructure Validation of the approach and developed tools will be done by evaluation the design of a multifunctional, resilient, large scale urban complex (anno 2020), called the ELASSTIC complex. This large multifunctional complex combines housing, shopping centre, transport node, business centre and entertainment centre. The ELASSTIC complex will not only be secure and resilient to disasters, it will also be designed to ensure fast and efficient evacuation in case of a disaster. For a crowded complex comprising a large number of people, the design of a smart evacuation system should be included at the start of the design of the complex. Taking evacuation and safety installations into account in the design phase will increase safety and is less expensive compared to an evacuation system integrated after the complex is build or at the final design stage.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-ITN-ETN | Phase: MSCA-ITN-2015-ETN | Award Amount: 3.72M | Year: 2016

Thousands of sites across Europe are polluted with toxic metals and organic solvents; many more exist worldwide. As EU population grows, clean water will determine the quality of life and economic stability. Most sites remain contaminated because existing technology is costly and disruptive. Society needs an innovative way to decontaminate soil and groundwater directly underground. In METAL-AID, we will develop new technologies through fundamental knowledge. We are a consortium of experts in natural materials, contaminant reactivity, groundwater treatment and environment policy, spread over 4 consulting firms, 6 universities and a government agency. We will train 14 early stage researchers (ESRs) through integrated, intersectoral research, using advanced technology, ranging from nanometre to field scale. ESRs will gain technical, business and personal skills, as they push a promising soil and groundwater remediation technology toward commercialisation. To meet the METAL-AID goals, the ESRs will: 1) Test known layered double hydroxide (LDH) and redox active green rust (GR) reactants that show promise for remediating toxic metals and chlorinated compounds and invent new ones; 2) Derive thermodynamic and kinetic data, essential for safety assessment modelling; 3) Quantify reactant effectiveness and reacted phase stability and compare these with natural analogues; 4) Inject the new reactants at field sites operated by our beneficiaries. METAL-AID begins at technology readiness level, TRL 1 and runs to TRL 6, implementation. The government agency will provide guidance so our new technology complies with regulations and has promised R&D funding after the ETN ends, to carry it into full commercialisation. The ESRs will be trained to tackle challenges of concern to society, to communicate across sector boundaries and with the public, in a network that will last long after the project ends. We will provide a pool of scientists for roles in EUs knowledge based economy.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: WATER-1a-2014 | Award Amount: 4.17M | Year: 2015

Coastal areas are the most productive and economically dominant regions of the world. The high water demand in these regions, however, puts tremendous pressure on their freshwater resources and ecosystems. This leads to problems like seasonal water shortage, saltwater intrusion, and disappearance of wetlands. Building on national, regional and European research and innovation programs, in the past five years, a set of innovative, practical concepts have been developed for protection, enlargement and utilization of freshwater resources in coastal areas. These subsurface water solutions (SWS) combine innovations in water well design and configuration, allowing for advanced groundwater management, and maximum control over freshwater resources. SWS have been successfully piloted by public-private partnerships. These full-scale pilots have demonstrated SWS capacity to support sustainable freshwater supply in coastal areas, energy reduction, food production, and financial savings. SUBSOL targets a market breakthrough of SWS as robust answers to freshwater resources challenges in coastal areas, by demonstration, market replication, standardization and commercialisation. The route to market includes business cases, market scans and capacity building in selected regions in Europe (Mediterranean, Northwestern Europe) and worldwide (USA, Brazil, China, Vietnam). SUBSOL will share experiences and outcomes with stakeholder groups through an online platform, that will be linked to existing networks, including EIP on Water. The SUBSOL consortium combines knowledge providers, technology SMEs, consultants, and end-users from across Europe. Our ambition is to introduce a new way of thinking in terms of water resources management, promoting the sustainable development of coastal areas worldwide. This will stimulate economic growth and will create market opportunities and jobs for the European industry and SMEs.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: DRS-09-2014 | Award Amount: 7.47M | Year: 2015

With most of its population and capital goods concentrated in urban areas, cities are key to the European economy. One of the major challenges cities face are more frequent extreme weather events due to climate change.The current diversity of approaches and methods available for cities developing an adaptation strategy limits the comparability between cities of vulnerabilities, adaptation options, infrastructures, etc., and, as a result, the resilience capability. The lack of standardized information to prioritize and select appropriate adaptation options restricts the exchange of experiences between cities. The objective of RESIN is to provide standardised methodologies for vulnerability assessments, performance evaluations of adaptation measures, and for decision support tools supporting the development of robust adaptation strategies tailored to the city. To this end, RESIN aims to create a common unifying framework that allows comparing strategies, results and identification of best practices by Creating an urban typology that characterises European cities based on different socio-economic and biophysical variables Delivering standardised methods for assessing climate change impacts, vulnerabilities, and risks; providing an inventory of adaptation measures and developing standardised methods to assess the performance of such adaptation measures Collaborating closely with 4 case cities for practical applicability and reproducibility, and with European Standardisation organisations to ensure a systematic (standardised) implementation Integrating findings in a coherent framework for the decision making process, with associated methods, tools and datasets The consortium consists of 17 partners from 8 different European countries, experienced in urban resilience and climate change, and combining theory (knowledge institutes/universities) with practice (cities, consultancies, network organisation, standardisation institute).

Loading Arcadis collaborators
Loading Arcadis collaborators