Entity

Time filter

Source Type

Phoenix, AZ, United States

Grant
Agency: Department of Agriculture | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 100.00K | Year: 2015

Soybean meal has long been a critical input for animal feed in monogastric animals (such as chickens and pigs) as it provides an ideal protein profile to promote healthy, rapid animal growth at a competitive price. More recently, aquaculture, the fastest growing commercial animal protein segment, has sought to take advantage of the protein and cost advantages of soybean meal as an affordable protein substitute to more expensive and less sustainable fish feeds. In 2013, global aquaculture feed included approximately 15 million metric tons of soybean meal, or about 525 million bushels of soybeans. With global aquaculture production poised to double in the next 20 years the need for sustainable, cost effective feed inputs will be greater than ever - and soybean-based feeds must be part of the solution. Unfortunately, soy feeds use in aquaculture remains limited due to the presence of anti-nutritional factors (ANF) including undigested oligosaccharides, lectins that damage the intestinal lining and phytate that binds to and prevents the uptake of proteins.Our ultimate goal is to generate a soybean variety (or soybean varieties) with eliminated or reduced ANFs to support increased feed conversion ratios (FCRs) and allow for greater soybean meal inclusion in feeding rations. Our project will leverage Arcadia's robust soybean TILLING library, which has enough genetic diversity to evaluate the ANF levels in plants with a range of mutations in targeted genes - thus creating the best potential to identify commercially attractive traits. More precisely, in phase 1 we will identify allelic series of nonsense and missense mutations in genes directly responsible for the synthesis of the three targeted ANFs.In phase 2, the best mutations for each of the ANF traits will be introgressed into an elite soybean variety. The effects of each mutation on the phenotype and agronomic characteristics of the new varieties will be evaluated individually and in combination to produce a "low ANF" variety with competitive agronomic performance.


Patent
Arcadia Biosciences, Inc. | Date: 2012-09-18

Methods of increasing nitrogen utilization efficiency in monocot plants through genetic modification to increase the levels of alanine aminotransferase expression and plants produced there from are described. In particular, methods for increasing the biomass and yield of transgenic monocot plants grown under nitrogen limiting conditions compared to non-transgenic plants are described. In this way, monocot plants may be produced that maintain a desired yield while reducing the need for high levels of nitrogen application.


The present invention provides a series of independent human-induced, non-transgenic mutations found in at least one tomato -galactosidase 4 gene, tomato plants having these mutations in at least one of their tomato -galactosidase 4 genes, and a method of creating and identifying similar and/or additional mutations in the tomato -galactosidase 4 gene by screening pooled and/or individual tomato plants. Tomato plants identified and produced in accordance with the present invention have fruit that are firmer when ripe with reduced post-harvest softening compared to fruit from wild type tomato plants as a result of non-transgenic mutations in at least one of their tomato -galactosidase 4 genes.


Patent
Arcadia Biosciences, Inc. | Date: 2014-07-07

A series of independent human-induced, non-transgenic mutations found in at least one non-ripening (NOR) gene of tomato; tomato plants having these mutations in at least one of their NOR genes; and a method of creating and identifying similar and/or additional mutations in the NOR gene by screening pooled and/or individual tomato plants. The tomato plants of the present invention exhibit fruit that ripen more slowly, rot more slowly, are firmer, and have a longer shelf life post-harvest as a result of non-transgenic mutations in at least one of their NOR genes.


Patent
Arcadia Biosciences, Inc. | Date: 2014-07-07

A series of independent human-induced, non-transgenic mutations found in at least one non-ripening (NOR) gene of tomato; tomato plants having these mutations in at least one of their NOR genes; and a method of creating and identifying similar and/or additional mutations in the NOR gene by screening pooled and/or individual tomato plants. The tomato plants of the present invention exhibit fruit that ripen more slowly, rot more slowly, are firmer, and have a longer shelf life post-harvest as a result of non-transgenic mutations in at least one of their NOR genes.

Discover hidden collaborations