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News Article | December 22, 2016
Site: www.eurekalert.org

In experiments on mice with a form of aggressive brain cancer, Johns Hopkins researchers have shown that localized chemotherapy delivered directly to the brain rather than given systemically may be the best way to keep the immune system intact and strong when immunotherapy is also part of the treatment. The researchers say their study results, reported Dec. 21 in Science Translational Medicine, could directly affect the design of immunotherapy clinical trials and treatment strategies for people with a deadly form of brain cancer called glioblastoma. "We understand that our research was done in a mouse model and not in humans, but our evidence is strong that systemic chemotherapy alters the immune system in a way that it never fully recovers," says Michael Lim, M.D., associate professor of neurosurgery and director of brain tumor immunotherapy at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and member of the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center. "With aggressive cancers like glioblastoma, it is important that we don't handicap the defenses we may need to add alternative treatments, such as immunotherapy, to chemotherapy," he adds. Lim's laboratory in neurosurgery and a team from the Bloomberg~Kimmel Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy led by Drew Pardoll, M.D., Ph.D., performed their studies in a mouse with glioblastoma. In people, glioblastoma is a particularly aggressive form of cancer, with a typical survival time of just over a year after diagnosis. Current treatments include surgical removal of the visible tumor, radiation and chemotherapy. Because the disease is so lethal, even after aggressive standard treatment, neurosurgeons like Lim are looking to add newer immunotherapies that use the body's own immune system cells to fight the tumor. However, one challenge to immunotherapy, Lim says, has been the potential toxic effects of systemic therapies that could damage or interfere with the immune system and weaken the chances for success of immunotherapy approaches. With clinical trials being designed to integrate standard of care with immunotherapy, Lim and his team sought to create a way to accurately assess the impact of localized versus systemic chemotherapy on the immune system's ability to stay healthy, and to see which kind of chemotherapy would actually improve survival time in the test mice. To determine if one method of chemotherapy delivery was better over another when combined with immunotherapy, the researchers first gave a group of mice with glioblastoma clinically relevant doses the immunotherapy drug anti-PD-1 (200 milligrams per kilogram) and then treated the mice with chemotherapy either throughout the whole body or directly to the brain over two weeks. For the whole-body, or systemic, chemotherapy, the mice were injected in their bellies with 30 milligrams per kilogram of the chemotherapy drug carmustine -- the same drug used against glioblastoma in people -- three times a week. Each treatment group contained 15 mice. For the local chemotherapy, the researchers directly implanted a wafer covered in molecules that bound carmustine, allowing sustained release of the drug over a week, into mice with established brain tumors. The researchers first took blood samples from the rodents' lymph nodes, brain, bone marrow and blood a couple of days after the end of the chemotherapy treatments, almost two weeks later and at the four-month mark. They focused on counting the number of white blood cells called lymphocytes (T cells) as a way to measure immune system integrity. The mice given systemic chemotherapy had much lower levels of lymphocytes than the mice given the local, long-lasting chemotherapy. For example, two weeks after treatment, mice with systemic chemotherapy had only about a third of the lymphocytes in their circulating blood as mice given the local chemotherapy. The researchers say their findings align with what is observed clinically in patients who received systemic chemotherapy. Lim says the suppression is suggested that the lymphocyte depletion caused by systemic chemotherapy is likely counterproductive to producing an effective antitumor immune response. Next, the team wanted to see if local versus systemic chemotherapy in conjunction with immunotherapy affected survival in the mice with glioblastoma. The scientists found that when they gave the mice chemotherapy locally, it acted together with the immunotherapy drug to improve survival to about 80 percent after 100 days when compared to mice receiving immunotherapy alone, local chemotherapy alone, or combined systemic chemotherapy and immunotherapy, with a survival rate of about 50 percent after 100 days. Then, they followed up these experiments by assessing the immune system's memory. They gave mice local chemotherapy or systemic chemotherapy in conjunction with immunotherapy, and then implanted them with more tumors. The mice with the systemic chemotherapy and immunotherapy all died when injected with extra tumors. But the mice with local chemotherapy and immunotherapy survived, essentially immunized against their glioblastoma. The researchers say this suggests that the systemic chemotherapy profoundly weakens the immune system. The researchers showed that the immune system weakening phenomenon isn't specific to carmustine and happens in multiple types of systemic chemotherapy, such as temozolomide. The researchers also reversed the treatment protocols, giving the chemotherapy before the immunotherapy to see if that worked better and improved survival. They didn't notice a difference in survival time whether the immunotherapy was given before or after the brain-specific chemotherapy. Only 10 percent of people diagnosed with glioblastoma live more than five years, according to the American Brain Tumor Association. Glioblastoma mostly occurs in people over 45 and in men somewhat more often than in woman. An estimated 15 percent of the 78,000 people diagnosed with brain tumors in the U.S. each year will be diagnosed with glioblastoma. Currently, a large number of immunotherapy trials are underway for patients with glioblastoma. There are only three immunotherapy drugs that are FDA-approved for treating other types of cancer, and they cost over $100,000 annually. The study was funded by Arbor Pharmaceuticals and other philanthropy, including funds from Agenus, Altor, BMS, Immunocellular, Celldex and Accuray. Lim is a consultant for Agenus, BMS, Merck, Oncorus, Accuray and Stryker. The study authors hold a patent and have applied for a second one for the concept of combining local chemotherapy and immunotherapy.


Brewer G.J.,University of Michigan | Brewer G.J.,Arbor Pharmaceuticals
International Journal of Alzheimer's Disease | Year: 2011

I present evidence that the epidemic of Alzheimer's disease is a new phenomenon exploding in the latter part of the 20th century in developed countries. I postulate that a major causative factor in the epidemic is the coincident use of copper plumbing, and the ingestion of inorganic copper leaching from the copper plumbing. I present evidence to support this hypothesis and discuss various objections and criticisms that have been raised about the hypothesis, and my responses to these criticisms. I conclude that the hypothesis is well supported by the evidence and deserves serious consideration, because if it is valid, it indentifies a partially preventable cause of Alzheimer's disease. © 2011 George J. Brewer.


Brewer G.J.,University of Michigan | Brewer G.J.,Arbor Pharmaceuticals
Journal of Trace Elements in Medicine and Biology | Year: 2012

In this review I present the hypothesis that a toxic substance, inorganic copper, ingested from drinking water and vitamin/mineral supplements containing inorganic copper, is at least partially causal of the epidemic of Alzheimer's disease (AD) we are seeing in developed countries. I set the stage for this hypothesis by pointing out that the epidemic is a new disease phenomenon coinciding temporally with the use of copper plumbing in developed countries. The evidence is good that AD was nonexistent or rare in the 1800s and early 1900s, and the arguments that elderly people did not exist in those times, or that AD was simply attributed to senility, are refuted. The web of evidence tying ingestion of inorganic copper as a causal factor in AD is strong, and includes AD animal model data where trace amounts of inorganic copper in the drinking water markedly worsened AD, human studies where ingestion of copper supplements, along with a high fat diet, is associated with a marked loss of cognition, human studies showing a markedly higher mortality in elderly women ingesting copper supplements, as well as other data. It is likely that a high fat diet works in conjunction with ingestion of inorganic copper to increase the risk of AD. It is clear that some factor toxic to the brain is present in the environment in developed countries, but not undeveloped countries, and is a major risk factor for AD. I believe that that toxic factor is ingestion of inorganic copper. © 2012 Elsevier GmbH.


Brewer G.J.,University of Michigan | Brewer G.J.,Arbor Pharmaceuticals
BioFactors | Year: 2012

In this special issue about biofactors causing cognitive impairment, we present evidence for and discuss two such biofactors. One is excess copper, causing neuronal toxicity. The other is zinc deficiency, causing neuronal damage. We present evidence that Alzheimer's disease (AD) has become an epidemic in developed, but not undeveloped, countries and that the epidemic is a new disease phenomenon, beginning in the early 1900s and exploding in the last 50 years. This leads to the conclusion that something in the developed environment is a major risk factor for AD. We hypothesize that the factor is inorganic copper, leached from the copper plumbing, the use of which coincides with the AD epidemic. We present a web of evidence supporting this hypothesis. Regarding zinc, we have shown that patients with AD are zinc deficient when compared with age-matched controls. Zinc has critical functions in the brain, and lack of zinc can cause neuronal death. A nonblinded study about 20 years ago showed considerable improvement in AD with zinc therapy, and a mouse AD model study also showed significant cognitive benefit from zinc supplementation. In a small blinded study we carried out, post hoc analysis revealed that 6 months of zinc therapy resulted in significant benefit relative to placebo controls in two cognitive measuring systems. These two factors may be linked in that zinc therapy significantly reduced free copper levels. Thus, zinc may act by lowering copper toxicity or by direct benefit on neuronal health, or both. © 2012 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.


Brewer G.J.,University of Michigan | Brewer G.J.,Arbor Pharmaceuticals
Inorganica Chimica Acta | Year: 2012

It is clear that copper accumulation and toxicity is the cause of Wilson's disease. It is also well established that zinc therapy is effective in treating Wilson's disease by a mechanism of blocking intestinal copper absorption. An emerging hypothesis holds that ingestion of inorganic copper, such as from drinking water, plays a causal role in Alzheimer's disease. The evidence behind this theory is discussed. There is good preliminary evidence that zinc therapy slows cognition loss in Alzheimer's disease, either by repleting zinc in zinc deficient neurons, or by lowering the body's free copper levels. Finally, evidence is presented on a variety of animal models and one human disease (primary biliary cirrhosis) that by lowering copper levels using a drug called tetrathiomolybdate, inflammatory fibrotic, and immune-modulated disease processes are benefitted. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


News Article | October 3, 2014
Site: www.fiercebiotech.com

Private drugmaker Arbor Pharmaceuticals is looking for a buyer, according to Reuters, going on the market with a price tag that could exceed $1 billion. The Atlanta-headquartered company has retained JPMorgan Chase to spread the word of its availability, Reuters' sources say, talking up the potential of its on-the-market cardiology and pediatric drugs plus its pipeline of proprietary products. The majority of Arbor's marketed products are generics, but the company has branched out into developing molecules of its own, including the neurology treatment AR02, a drug under FDA review on which the company expects a final decision by Oct. 23. Arbor is also at work on the late-stage cardio drug AR05, the Phase III hospital-care treatment AR10 and the Phase II pediatric psychiatry candidate AR08. Arbor's approach to specialty pharma involves spotlighting treatments that can be quickly brought to market, whether via internal development or in-licensing. Last year, the company struck a deal with Takeda that gave U.S. rights to two hypertension treatments, and Arbor paid undisclosed sum to Eisai the year before to market Gliadel Wafer, an in-hospital treatment used during brain cancer surgeries. The company's reported interest in a deal comes amid a surge of M&A in the biopharma world, as patent expiries and reimbursement woes have left large drugmakers hungry for buyouts, while soaring valuations have smaller outfits commanding record price tags. Related Articles: J&J makes a splash in hep C with a $1.75B deal for Alios Troubled AMAG snaps up fresh-from-bankruptcy Lumara in $1.25B deal Daiichi Sankyo bags leukemia drug in $410M Ambit buyout


News Article | May 12, 2015
Site: www.businesswire.com

BOSTON--(BUSINESS WIRE)--LEERINK Partners, a leading healthcare investment bank, announced today that it has expanded its investment banking franchise with the hiring of four senior bankers and their teams, who were all previously at Lazard Middle Market. Doug Brown, Senior Managing Director, will lead the Healthcare Services and Private Equity Coverage franchises at LEERINK. Mike Drendel, Managing Director, will lead the Specialty & Generic Pharmaceuticals franchise. Jeff Danesis, Director, will focus on Healthcare Services and Byron Webster, Director, will focus on Specialty & Generic Pharmaceuticals. These experienced bankers bring considerable healthcare mergers and acquisitions advisory experience and extensive sector and private equity relationships to LEERINK Partners. The newly formed Charlotte, North Carolina office will have 10 investment banking professionals. During Mr. Brown’s and Mr. Drendel’s six years at Lazard, they advised clients on over 25 M&A transactions, representing $8 billion in aggregate deal value. Both bankers will report to Jim Boylan, President and Head of Investment Banking of LEERINK Partners. “We are thrilled to welcome Doug, Mike and their teams to LEERINK Partners. They are exceptional investment bankers, with strong client relationships, who differentiate themselves through their knowledge and substance-based approach to advising clients,” said Mr. Boylan. “After record revenues and growth in 2013 and 2014, we have been focused on expanding our investment banking footprint.” “We are fortunate to have hired such an accomplished team of bankers with their M&A focus,” said Jeff Leerink, Chairman and CEO of LEERINK Partners. “We are excited to have joined LEERINK Partners, which will prove to be the ideal platform to serve our clients,” said Mr. Brown. “Given the firm’s exclusive focus in healthcare and its market leading Equity Capital Markets platform, it is the perfect complement to our business, which has been focused on owner/operator and private equity owned healthcare companies. Furthermore, we will grow our practices to include innovative and growth-minded publicly traded healthcare companies." “My focus in Specialty & Generic Pharmaceuticals is a natural extension of LEERINK’s prominent biopharma investment banking franchise,” said Mr. Drendel. “We look forward to leveraging the resources of the firm and believe that our transaction experience and industry relationships will further distinguish the LEERINK Partners investment banking franchise.” LEERINK Partners is a leading investment bank, specializing in healthcare. Our knowledge, experience and focus enable us to help our clients define and achieve their strategic, capital markets and investment objectives. We partner with companies that develop and commercialize innovative products and services that are defining the future of healthcare. For more information, please visit: www.leerink.com. Doug Brown has joined LEERINK Partners as a Senior Managing Director overseeing the firm’s Healthcare Services Practice and Private Equity Coverage. Prior to joining LEERINK Partners, Doug was a Managing Director at Lazard for six years serving as the Middle Market Healthcare Group Head. Notable transactions at Lazard include the sale of Solstas Lab Partners to Quest Diagnostics, the sale of Genova Diagnostics to Levine Leichtmann, the sale of Viracor to Eurofins Scientific, the sale of Liberty Dialysis to KRG, the sale of MedTox Scientific to Laboratory Corporation of America, the sale of Ernest Health to MPT, Miraca’s acquisition of Caris Diagnostics, the sale of Boston Heart Diagnostics to Eurofins Scientific, the sale of National Surgical Hospitals to Irving Place Capital, and the sale of Healthtronics to Endo Pharmaceuticals. Before Lazard, Doug was a Managing Director at Wachovia Securities, focused on healthcare services. Doug has over 20 years of investment banking experience and has focused on healthcare services since 2001. He has worked on over 100 closed transactions, working with clients on sellside and buyside M&A as well as public and private debt and equity financings. Doug’s specific areas of healthcare services experience include diagnostic services, specialty physician services, alternate site healthcare, specialty hospitals as well as home health. Doug earned his MBA from the Fuqua School of Business at Duke University and received his undergraduate business degree from the University of Texas at Austin. Mike Drendel has joined LEERINK Partners as a Managing Director overseeing the firm’s Specialty & Generic Pharmaceuticals practice. Mike joins from Lazard where he was a Managing Director and spent six years advising specialty pharmaceuticals companies in M&A transactions. Mike brings over 15 years of investment banking experience. Prior to Lazard, Mike worked in the healthcare investment banking group at Wachovia Securities on a variety of advisory and corporate finance transactions. Mike’s relevant and representative transactions include advising Arbor Pharmaceuticals on the sale of a significant minority stake in the company to KKR; Vidara Therapeutics on its sale to Horizon Pharma; Revive Pharmaceuticals (PBM Pharmaceuticals) on the sale of Donnatal to Concordia Healthcare; Cornerstone Therapeutics on its sale to Chiesi Farmaceutici; Boca Pharmacal on its sale to Endo; Medafor on its sale to C.R. Bard; EKR Therapeutics on its sale to Cornerstone Therapeutics; Victory Pharma on its sale to Shionogi; Azur Pharma on its sale to Jazz Pharmaceuticals; Victory Pharma on its sale to Shionogi; and Alaven Pharmaceutical on its sale to Meda. He earned his MBA from the University of Chicago and his bachelor of business administration degree from the University of Notre Dame. Jeff Danesis has joined LEERINK Partners as a Director. Jeff joins from Lazard where he was a Director in the Healthcare Group. Prior to Lazard, Jeff was an Associate at Wachovia Securities in the Healthcare Investment Banking Group. He earned his MBA from the University of Chicago and his bachelor degree from Northwestern University. Byron Webster has joined LEERINK Partners as a Director. Byron joins from Lazard where he was Vice President in the Healthcare Group. Prior to Lazard, he spent seven years in the Healthcare Investment Banking group at Wells Fargo Securities. He earned his bachelor of arts degree in economics from Wake Forest University.


News Article | May 12, 2015
Site: www.businesswire.com

BOSTON--(BUSINESS WIRE)--LEERINK Partners, a leading healthcare investment bank, announced today that it has expanded its investment banking franchise with the hiring of four senior bankers and their teams, who were all previously at Lazard Middle Market. Doug Brown, Senior Managing Director, will lead the Healthcare Services and Private Equity Coverage franchises at LEERINK. Mike Drendel, Managing Director, will lead the Specialty & Generic Pharmaceuticals franchise. Jeff Danesis, Director, will focus on Healthcare Services and Byron Webster, Director, will focus on Specialty & Generic Pharmaceuticals. These experienced bankers bring considerable healthcare mergers and acquisitions advisory experience and extensive sector and private equity relationships to LEERINK Partners. The newly formed Charlotte, North Carolina office will have 10 investment banking professionals. During Mr. Brown’s and Mr. Drendel’s six years at Lazard, they advised clients on over 25 M&A transactions, representing $8 billion in aggregate deal value. Both bankers will report to Jim Boylan, President and Head of Investment Banking of LEERINK Partners. “We are thrilled to welcome Doug, Mike and their teams to LEERINK Partners. They are exceptional investment bankers, with strong client relationships, who differentiate themselves through their knowledge and substance-based approach to advising clients,” said Mr. Boylan. “After record revenues and growth in 2013 and 2014, we have been focused on expanding our investment banking footprint.” “We are fortunate to have hired such an accomplished team of bankers with their M&A focus,” said Jeff Leerink, Chairman and CEO of LEERINK Partners. “We are excited to have joined LEERINK Partners, which will prove to be the ideal platform to serve our clients,” said Mr. Brown. “Given the firm’s exclusive focus in healthcare and its market leading Equity Capital Markets platform, it is the perfect complement to our business, which has been focused on owner/operator and private equity owned healthcare companies. Furthermore, we will grow our practices to include innovative and growth-minded publicly traded healthcare companies." “My focus in Specialty & Generic Pharmaceuticals is a natural extension of LEERINK’s prominent biopharma investment banking franchise,” said Mr. Drendel. “We look forward to leveraging the resources of the firm and believe that our transaction experience and industry relationships will further distinguish the LEERINK Partners investment banking franchise.” LEERINK Partners is a leading investment bank, specializing in healthcare. Our knowledge, experience and focus enable us to help our clients define and achieve their strategic, capital markets and investment objectives. We partner with companies that develop and commercialize innovative products and services that are defining the future of healthcare. For more information, please visit: www.leerink.com. Doug Brown has joined LEERINK Partners as a Senior Managing Director overseeing the firm’s Healthcare Services Practice and Private Equity Coverage. Prior to joining LEERINK Partners, Doug was a Managing Director at Lazard for six years serving as the Middle Market Healthcare Group Head. Notable transactions at Lazard include the sale of Solstas Lab Partners to Quest Diagnostics, the sale of Genova Diagnostics to Levine Leichtmann, the sale of Viracor to Eurofins Scientific, the sale of Liberty Dialysis to KRG, the sale of MedTox Scientific to Laboratory Corporation of America, the sale of Ernest Health to MPT, Miraca’s acquisition of Caris Diagnostics, the sale of Boston Heart Diagnostics to Eurofins Scientific, the sale of National Surgical Hospitals to Irving Place Capital, and the sale of Healthtronics to Endo Pharmaceuticals. Before Lazard, Doug was a Managing Director at Wachovia Securities, focused on healthcare services. Doug has over 20 years of investment banking experience and has focused on healthcare services since 2001. He has worked on over 100 closed transactions, working with clients on sellside and buyside M&A as well as public and private debt and equity financings. Doug’s specific areas of healthcare services experience include diagnostic services, specialty physician services, alternate site healthcare, specialty hospitals as well as home health. Doug earned his MBA from the Fuqua School of Business at Duke University and received his undergraduate business degree from the University of Texas at Austin. Mike Drendel has joined LEERINK Partners as a Managing Director overseeing the firm’s Specialty & Generic Pharmaceuticals practice. Mike joins from Lazard where he was a Managing Director and spent six years advising specialty pharmaceuticals companies in M&A transactions. Mike brings over 15 years of investment banking experience. Prior to Lazard, Mike worked in the healthcare investment banking group at Wachovia Securities on a variety of advisory and corporate finance transactions. Mike’s relevant and representative transactions include advising Arbor Pharmaceuticals on the sale of a significant minority stake in the company to KKR; Vidara Therapeutics on its sale to Horizon Pharma; Revive Pharmaceuticals (PBM Pharmaceuticals) on the sale of Donnatal to Concordia Healthcare; Cornerstone Therapeutics on its sale to Chiesi Farmaceutici; Boca Pharmacal on its sale to Endo; Medafor on its sale to C.R. Bard; EKR Therapeutics on its sale to Cornerstone Therapeutics; Victory Pharma on its sale to Shionogi; Azur Pharma on its sale to Jazz Pharmaceuticals; Victory Pharma on its sale to Shionogi; and Alaven Pharmaceutical on its sale to Meda. He earned his MBA from the University of Chicago and his bachelor of business administration degree from the University of Notre Dame. Jeff Danesis has joined LEERINK Partners as a Director. Jeff joins from Lazard where he was a Director in the Healthcare Group. Prior to Lazard, Jeff was an Associate at Wachovia Securities in the Healthcare Investment Banking Group. He earned his MBA from the University of Chicago and his bachelor degree from Northwestern University. Byron Webster has joined LEERINK Partners as a Director. Byron joins from Lazard where he was Vice President in the Healthcare Group. Prior to Lazard, he spent seven years in the Healthcare Investment Banking group at Wells Fargo Securities. He earned his bachelor of arts degree in economics from Wake Forest University.


According to a new market report published by Transparency Market Research Pipeline Review of Glioblastoma Treatment Market - Global Industry Analysis, Size, Share, Growth, Trends and Forecast, 2014 - 2022, the global glioblastoma treatment market was valued at USD 0.34 billion in 2013 and is estimated to reach USD 0.91 billion by 2022 at a CAGR of 11.4% from 2014 to 2022. To browse through the ToC or purchase the Glioblastoma  Treatment Market Report, please visit: http://www.transparencymarketresearch.com/pipeline-review-of-glioblastoma-treatment-market.html Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), also categorized as high-grade glioma, is the most aggressive astrocytic tumor, composed of poorly differentiated neoplastic astrocytes (subtype of central nervous system cells). The pipeline analysis of the GBM treatment market has been segmented on the basis of type of drug and geography. Three drugs that cover the major market of GBM treatment are bevacizumab (Avastin), temozolomide (Temodar/Temodal/Temcad), and carmustine (BiCNU). Regions covered in the geography segment include North America, Europe, Asia Pacific, and Rest of the World (RoW). For additional information about the Glioblastoma Treatment Market Report, visit: http://www.transparencymarketresearch.com/sample/sample.php?flag=s&rep_id=4807 The FDA approved treatments for GBM comprises carmustine, temozolomide, and bevacozumab. Carmiustine drug is brand named as Gliadel (Arbor Pharmaceuticals, LLC) which is a surgical implant, while bevacozumab (Brand name Avastin, product of Genetech/Roche) is targeted for intravenous therapy and temozolomide (Temodar/Temodal/Temcad and other brands) is recommended for intravenous or oral chemotherapy. The factors driving the glioblastoma treatment market include rising awareness against various types of brain tumors, research and development in drug delivery technologies and combination of modern diagnostic techniques. In 2013, temozolomide dominated the global glioblastoma market due to the therapeutic benefit of alkylated/methylated DNA, which most often occurs at the N-7 or O-6 positions of guanine residues. In 2012, the drug had lost its exclusivity and lead to the entry of generic drugs in the market, thereby, reducing the market share globally. Geographically, in 2013 North America dominated the global glioblastoma market owing to rising incidences of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) coupled with increasing number of associations such as American Brain Tumor Association, National Brain Tumor Society, Brain Tumor Foundation of Canada and others engaged in raising awareness for GBM in the region. In addition, majority of the manufacturers developing drugs for the treatment of glioblastoma are domiciled in the region thereby, supporting the dominance of the North America market. Asia Pacific is the most lucrative regional market for glioblastoma due to rising awareness against GBM which is boosting the diagnostic rate in Asia Pacific and developing healthcare infrastructure by upgrading the diagnostic and treatment facilities in Asia Pacific. Merck & Co., Inc., F. Hoffmann-Le Roche AG, and Arbor Pharmaceuticals, LLC are the key players dominated the global GBM treatment market in 2013. The other generic drug manufacturers present in the global glioblastoma market are Teva Pharmaceutical Industries, Ltd., Amneal Pharmaceuticals. LLC, Sun Pharmaceutical Industries, Ltd., amongst others. The pipeline review of glioblastoma treatment market has been segmented as below: Transparency Market Research is a global market intelligence company, providing global business information reports and services. Our exclusive blend of quantitative forecasting and trends analysis provides forward-looking insight for thousands of decision makers. Our experienced team of Analysts, Researchers, and Consultants, use proprietary data sources and various tools and techniques to gather, and analyze information. Our data repository is continuously updated and revised by a team of research experts, so that it always reflects the latest trends and information. With a broad research and analysis capability, Transparency Market Research employs rigorous primary and secondary research techniques in developing distinctive data sets and research material for business reports.


DUBLIN--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Research and Markets (http://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/ngqvlf/brain_hemorrhage) has announced the addition of the "Brain Hemorrhage Global Clinical Trials Review, H1, 2015" report to their offering. "Brain Hemorrhage Global Clinical Trials Review, H1, 2015" provides data on the Brain Hemorrhage clinical trial scenario. This report provides elemental information and data relating to the clinical trials on Brain Hemorrhage. It includes an overview of the trial numbers and their recruitment status as per the site of trial conduction across the globe. The databook offers a preliminary coverage of disease clinical trials by their phase, trial status, prominence of the sponsors and also provides briefing pertaining to the number of trials for the key drugs for treating Brain Hemorrhage.

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