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Horsham, Australia
Horsham, Australia
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The use of an aqueous polymer dispersion including at least one amorphous polymer having a Tg varying between 55 C. and 175 C. or a semi-crystalline polymer having a melting point varying between 70 C. and less than 220 C., the weight concentration of the polymer in the dispersion varying between 5 and 50%, with the polymer particles having an average size of less than 10000 nm, as a binder for impregnating strands or strips of natural fibres, in particular flax fibres, with said polymer being incorporated in the core of the fibre bundle forming the strand or strip and thereby binding the fibres together.


News Article | November 13, 2016
Site: www.theguardian.com

A simple idea, executed superbly, which fits the hand-held market to perfection, Mini Metro works despite the rather unglamorous premise of playing as an underground transport designer of a minimalist world, where stations and passengers are plain, geometric shapes. The various cities start with a river and three stations that can be connected. Passengers ping into existence needing to be ferried to destinations matching their outline, while periodic new destinations must be integrated into the growing network. The screw is then turned as both the geography and variety of station shapes are steadily expanded. Upgrades must be chosen carefully – central stations, new lines, tunnels or trains – and aligned with transport strategies to create a cacophony of logic that inevitably comes crashing down. The joy is then starting again with a pristine network and fresh hopes to keep things organised. Mini Metro’s exquisitely straightforward exterior hides within it a hugely complex and addictive challenge for both children and frustrated commuters alike. AR For a title that costs less than the average bus journey, Citalis packs an entertaining little punch. Essentially an urban planning simulator, it follows in the heritage of classics such as SimCity. Which means this is a game of mastering systems, where players must weave together residential districts, parkland, road infrastructure and commercial zones to found thriving, growing cities. Relative to its more typical genre‑mates, Citalis offers a meticulously cut-back, elegant affair. That’s not to say it is as minimal or casual as many mobile releases of this ilk, but on Citalis’s streets things are kept visually and mechanically understated and the result is a brilliantly absorbing game. Alas, after a few hours of play it does run out of momentum and is much too repetitive if played in long-form sessions. But for those hankering for a city-builder that sits gracefully between casual and hardcore, Citalis will prove to be £1.59 well spent. WF Packing in the Mega Drive’s Power Drift, Thunder Blade, Altered Beast, Galaxy Force II, Puyo Puyo 2, Fantasy Zone II W and the original Sonic the Hedgehog, plus the Master System’s Maze Walker, this compilation of Sega hits, all remastered with 3D support for Nintendo’s plucky handheld, is a retro gamer’s dream. The 3D treatment is extremely variable though. Some titles, such as Thunder Blade and Power Drift, make tremendous use of the effect to present a striking new way to experience these classics, while others – notably Sonic and Altered Beast – see little difference. There are other optimisations to be found, however: Power Drift offers both Japanese and international versions of the game, while puzzle game Puyo Puyo supports local multiplayer. All titles can also be saved now, a welcome option well suited to portable gaming. Sadly, there isn’t any real consistency in mapping original Mega Drive controls to the 3DS’s layout, making switching between games, in what is a decent package, frustrating. MK


News Article | February 27, 2017
Site: www.theguardian.com

This is a tale of seafaring and shipwreck in the 19th century, with players taking on the role of Devan Rensburg, a man of mixed heritage with an incredible story to tell – but what that story is up to you. There are elements of Kurosawa’s Rashomon at work in this beautiful point-and-click episodic adventure. Choices sculpt the story. Told in retrospect, Devan’s journey from the west back to the eastern territories of his birth touches on themes of racism and colonialism, but the use of an alternative history allows for a serious exploration of such topics without feeling heavy-handed. Despite indie roots, Herald also benefits from superb voice acting, bringing the cast to life and livening up dialogue-heavy sections. However, conversations can drag on, making more brain-teasing gameplay – puzzle-solving and investigating mysteries – feel thinly spread. Yet the rich world established in Herald’s first two chapters is enough to have you eagerly awaiting the remainder of Devan’s tale. MK Large-scale battling of metal behemoths meets the small-scale handheld console as Nintendo’s Tank Troopers puts players in command of an engaging and entertaining, if somewhat shortlived, third-person shooter. It’s been well put together too, with beautiful visuals that are easy to read, and simple and effective controls, with the 3DS’s gyroscope used to fine-tune targeting. Within this simple tank-versus-tank premise are 30 single-player arena battles that each culminate in big boss showdowns, while characters boast different abilities that must be used tactically to win different tanks and customisations such as camouflage, stamina, troopers and custom paint jobs. All of which makes for a neat package, but one that can be completed in about five hours, although specific challenges do offer reasons to replay levels and extend playtime substantially. However, a single copy of the game allows combat to take place between six players, in three game types: free-for-all, team battle and bomb battle. This is exuberant, tactical fun for all ages to enjoy. AR In terms of presentation, there’s perhaps never been a game like She Remembered Caterpillars. Developer Jumpsuit even has a new term for it – fungipunk, named after the organic worlds it takes place in. Despite appearances, this isn’t just a mushroom-filled fantasy presented with beautiful, eerie art and haunting, resonant music – it’s a satisfyingly brain-twisting puzzle. The story, delivered in snippets of dialogue, explores loss and regret, giving an emotional heft to gameplay. The purpose is to guide multicoloured “gammies” through each map to settle on pads. A red gammy can walk over a red caterpillar bridge, but will be blocked by a red gate. It starts simple, but combining multiple gammies – such as red and blue to make purple – and figuring out how to pass various colour-coded obstacles proves increasingly challenging. There are few command prompts though, making figuring out controls a puzzle itself, and levels occasionally rise in difficulty to a frustrating degree. Ultimately it’s a compelling and absorbing experience. MK​


Quirky, fun and nigh impossible to put down, Rhythm Paradise is exactly the sort of game at which Nintendo excels, and why the company remains so essential to gaming culture. There is a story, of sorts. You’re trying to help Tibby, an alien dog sporting a ’fro, return to his home world and meet some exceedingly strange characters along the way. It’s the barest of frameworks for a package of addictive mini-games, all challenging you to keep in time to the music. With the exception of the occasional vocal song – all jaunty J-pop numbers – each level is about 30 seconds long, making it perfect for on-the-go gaming. There is hilarious variety in the challenges too, from ping-pong atop a giant flower to plucking an onion’s facial hair, and completists will relish the host of bonus material. There may be a touch of repetition – this compiles 57 stages from previous Rhythm Paradise games – but with 14 new levels and 10 remixes, there’s plenty of madcap gameplay to keep the interest high. MK This toys-to-life title, in which figurines interact with the video game, has boosted its lineup of franchises and play modes. It opens with Ghostbusters, Mission: Impossible, The A-Team and Adventure Time and will continue with Fantastic Beasts, The Lego Batman Movie, Sonic the Hedgehog, Knight Rider, ET and Gremlins. One of the key attractions of Dimensions has been the modular route it has taken. There are story expansions that add six-level adventures and smaller fun, team and level packs that add characters from franchises and open new worlds. It’s still not cheap, but each addition is perfectly realised in Lego toy form, offering physical and on-screen characters and vehicles compatible with all parts of the game, which now includes four-player split-screen battle arenas. Gameplay remains a familiar amalgam of fetch, carry and unlock, but open worlds also add much-needed non-linear progression. There are no great surprises, but what made the first year so good – gleeful recreation of movies and TV – continues to shine through. AR The Skylanders franchise has taken a slightly different route to rival Lego in the toys-to-life genre, with Imaginators’ new character-creation tool allowing children to design their own playable heroes. This adds a fresh incentive to the familiar combat action with new character parts to find and collect. The starter pack comes with everything needed to complete the game and one “creation crystal” with which to make a Skylander, but of course there is a range of ways to expand the experience further – new toys and digital purchases. Empowering children to make their own characters changes play patterns and increases engagement considerably. You can even order a fully functioning 3D-printed toy of your child’s creations should you so wish (and have deep enough pockets). Add to this the option of Crash Bandicoot characters and levels, support for every existing Skylander and all the kart-racing content from last year and Skylanders Imaginators looks like a package that is hard to beat. AR


From the off, Resident Evil 7 promises a welcome, classic approach. While searching for his missing wife, Ethan Winters is trapped by the psychopathic Baker family. This clan of killers stalks their mansion’s creaking halls and seems impossible to kill, forcing Ethan to resort to stealth and puzzle-solving if he wants to survive the night. Previous games in the series may have lost their way and strayed towards cheap action, but Resident Evil 7: Biohazard steers a course back to horror. Players are put front and centre in the nightmare by the new first-person viewpoint. Every creaking floorboard fills you with dread and the Bakers are perhaps the series’ most terrifying, yet compelling, villains. More impressively, the well-crafted story manages to tie in well with the series while still being fresh and accessible to new players. A shift of perspective proves just the adrenaline shot the troubled franchise needed to come shambling back from the dead. Resident Evil 7: Biohazard is a triumphant and gorgeously grotesque return to form. PH A spin-off from a TV show that is unusually pleasing in catering both to its target audience and the adults paying the bills, the PJ Masks cartoon heroes from the Disney Junior programme are a very welcome addition to the endless runner genre. Catboy, Owlette and Gekko star as the child superheroes and take turns exploring randomly generated city and park zones, while navigating obstacles and collecting toys to trigger each character’s unique superpower. It’s bright, simple fun, but Super City Run also packs a proper video game punch. Progress through the levels and the streets is increasingly complex to navigate. Timing becomes critical, as does scanning ahead to avoid traps and dead ends. Parents will appreciate a single up-front cost (£2.99) rather than in-app purchases and there is also a happy absence of grinding to unlock content. Everything is available from the off. PJ Masks: Super City Run proves that cross-media conversions can, when done well, successfully combine TV characters with enjoyable gameplay. AR Downsized but by no means downplayed, this 3DS version of the Wii U’s Yoshi’s Woolly World perfectly shrinks the console title for Nintendo’s handheld, while adding extra companions and bonus stages. The classic platforming format, imagined here in knitted, sewn and cross-stitched form, has been converted well; gameplay is pixel-perfect with levels inviting exploration and experimentation to find all the hidden flowers, yarn balls and gems. Although the two-player option is missing on the 3DS, youngsters will appreciate the “mellow” mode that ensures the game is accessible to all ages and an impressive range of amiibo figurines and cards is supported. Each dresses Yoshi in a woolly version of the related character, while new outfits can be designed in the new Yoshi hut zone. All of which sits within the framework of a masterclass in platforming. It is bright, accessible and always inviting just one more go. For fans or newcomers of all ages, it’s a very strong addition to the 3DS line-up. AR


Barlow K.M.,Australian Department of Primary Industries and Fisheries | Christy B.P.,Australian Department of Primary Industries and Fisheries | O'Leary G.J.,AR | Riffkin P.A.,AR | Nuttall J.G.,AR
Field Crops Research | Year: 2015

Extreme weather events (frost and heat shock), already a significant challenge for grain producers, are predicted to increase under future climate scenarios. This paper reviews the current knowledge on the impacts of extreme heat (heat shock) and frost on crop production and how these impacts are incorporated into contemporary process-based crop models.Heat shock and frost result in a range of physiological impacts on wheat. Based on the literature we conclude that the greatest impacts on production from frost are associated with sterility and the abortion of formed grains around anthesis. While the greatest yield impact from heat shock are reduced grain number (sterility and abortion of grains) during anthesis to early grain filling; as well as the reduced duration of grain filling. Crop models generally did not consider the non-linear response in grain yield from a heat shock or frost event due to these key physiological impacts. While frost damage was incorporated into a number of models through winterkill functions, seedling death or advanced senescence, only the STICS model incorporated a potential decrease in grain number around anthesis. In contrast, heat shock was rarely considered within crop models, with only two examples found in the literature; (1) APSIM-Nwheat which incorporated accelerated senescence in response to extreme heat and (2) MONICA which incorporated a reduction in grain number and yield.We propose a conceptual model for the change in grain number and therefore yield in response to both a frost and heat shock event. We discuss the potential use of daily maximum/minimum temperatures, canopy temperature and heat/frost loads for determining crop response in the models. As well as identifying the need for a greater understanding on how the duration of temperature extremes impact on yield, as well as the cumulative effects of multiple heat/frost events and the interactions with other abiotic stresses including drought. © 2014 Published by Elsevier B.V.


Trademark
Ar | Date: 2016-11-04

High jewelry; jewelry; precious stones; precious metals and their alloys; pearl (jewelry); cuff links; tie pins; rings; bracelets; earrings; pendants; necklaces (jewelry); brooches (jewelry); charms; key fobs of precious metals; works of art of precious metal; jewelry cases; boxes of precious metal; horological and chronometric instruments; watches; chronometers; pendulum clocks; miniature clocks; watch cases; bracelets for watches; chains, watch springs and watch glasses; cases for clock and watch-making, presentation boxes for watches. Retailing and wholesaling services of the following goods: High jewelry, jewelry; precious stones; precious metals and their alloys; pearl (jewelry); cuff links; tie pins; rings; bracelets; earrings; pendants; necklaces (jewelry); brooches (jewelry); charms; key fobs of precious metals; works of art of precious metal; jewelry cases; boxes of precious metal; horological and chronometric instruments; watches; chronometers; pendulum clocks; miniature clocks; watch cases; bracelets for watches; chains, watch springs and watch glasses; cases for clock and watch-making, presentation boxes for watches; on-line sales services via the internet or other electronic or computer telecommunications networks for the following goods : High jewelry; jewelry; precious stones; precious metals and their alloys; pearl (jewelry); charms; key fobs of precious metals; works of art of precious metal; jewelry cases; boxes of precious metal; horological and chronometric instruments; watched; chronometers; pendulum clocks; miniature clocks; watch cases; bracelets for watches; chains, watch springs and watch glasses; cases for clock and watch-making, presentation boxes for watches; presentation of goods on communication media, for retail purposes or wholesale of the following goods: High jewelry; jewelry; precious stones; precious metals and their alloys; pearl (jewelry); cuff links; tie pins; rings; bracelets; earrings; pendants; necklaces (jewelry); brooches (jewelry); charms; key fobs of precious metals; works of art of precious metal; jewelry cases; boxes of precious metal; horological and chronometric instruments; watches; chronometers; pendulum clocks; miniature clocks; watch cases; bracelets for watches; chains, watch springs and watch glasses; cases for clock and watch-making, presentation boxes for watches; advisory services relating to the purchase and sale of the following goods : high jewelry; jewelry; precious stones; precious metals and their alloys; pearl (jewelry); cuff links; tie pins; rings; bracelets; earrings; pendants; necklaces (jewelry); brooches (jewelry); charms; key fobs of precious metals; works of art of precious metal; jewelry cases; boxes of precious metal; horological and chronometric instruments; watches; chronometers; pendulum clocks; miniature clocks; watch cases; bracelets for watches; chains, watch springs and watch glasses; cases for clock and watch-making, presentation boxes for watches; organization of fashion shows for promotional purposes; organization of exhibitions for commercial or advertising purposes.


Ar

Trademark
Ar | Date: 2012-04-17

cleaning, polishing, scouring and abrasive preparations; perfumery, essential oils, cosmetics. Precious metals and their alloys and goods made of or coated with these materials namely, jewellery, precious stones, horological and chronometric instruments; jewelry, precious stones; horological and chronometric instruments. Trunks and suitcases.


News Article | November 7, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Technology public relations and integrated communications agency AR|PR today announced that it has been named a Top Place to Work by PR News and a Best Place to Work by the Atlanta Business Chronicle (ABC). In what PR News proclaimed to be the most competitive year for entries ever, AR|PR, in only its fourth year of existence, garnered Top Place to Work recognition alongside some of the industry’s largest and most prestigious agencies. Within its headquarter city of Atlanta, AR|PR was the only public relations agency finalist for the ABC’s Best Places to Work awards, ranking fifth in the small business category out of 50 finalists and more than 600 applicants. “Nothing is more important than the happiness and morale of our employees,” said Anna Ruth Williams, AR|PR founder and CEO. “Everything that we have accomplished, from outstanding client results to unprecedented growth, is directly correlated to having built a collaborative, flexible and motivational workplace environment in which everyone truly wants the best for each other. As a result, we’re exceeding the 100-year old PR industry’s abysmal turnover rate, and our first employees are still our employees.” PR News Top Place to Work winners are comprised of agencies that match their superb in-house and client PR work with equally outstanding efforts to support employees’ personal development and success. For the Atlanta Business Chronicle, AR|PR earned Best Places to Work distinction following the results of a third-party employee survey, which measured responses to questions on workplace environment, professional development opportunities, leadership effectiveness and transparency as well as team dynamics. Army of Awesome Promotions AR|PR also announced two senior team promotions to help support the agency’s expanding global client roster. Promotions and new hires include: “We continue to build our ‘army of awesome’ with PR and marketing professionals who aspire to be part of an agency that takes pride in disrupting the stale PR industry status quo,” added Broussard. “As we’ve grown, we have strategically expanded our team with employees comprised of various technical skills and industry knowledge in order to round out our coveted 360-degree approach.” To learn more about AR|PR’s current client roster, awards and services, and read our recent tech marketing resources, visit Click here to sign up to learn about the agency’s upcoming San Francisco market launch. About AR|PR As one of the nation’s fastest growing technology PR firms, the 2014 National Small Agency of the Year, and a 2016 Best Places to Work, AR|PR is a results-driven public relations and integrated communications agency for technology leaders. With a passion for telling technology and entrepreneurial stories, AR|PR cultivates strategic partnerships with its cybersecurity, mission critical, health IT, mobility and Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) clients. From high-growth startups to publicly traded enterprises, AR|PR helps companies within these industries cut through the noise and clutter to #makenews. For more information on the award-winning agency, visit its offices in Atlanta and New Orleans and online at arpr.co and @AR__PR.


News Article | December 22, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Technology public relations and integrated communications agency AR|PR today announced that it has been named Technology PR Agency of the Year by Bulldog Reporter, one of the most prestigious communications industry trade publications and a leading provider of media intelligence to agencies and corporate communicators. AR|PR was selected by a group of award-winning journalists - including a Pulitzer Prize Winner - from prestigious media outlets, including the Washington Post, USA Today and The Oregonian. These media influencers oversee Bulldog’s rigorous three-round judging process before determining the winners. “AR|PR is fundamentally disrupting the standard for which tech PR agencies from Silicon Alley to Silicon Valley conduct business,” said Anna Ruth Williams, founder and CEO of AR|PR. “We started out as a one-person tech PR firm to serve Atlanta’s burgeoning tech scene. In the years since, our high standard of excellence has resulted in a diverse roster of more than 20 clients headquartered across 4 continents and client retention and employee satisfaction rates that far exceed the industry standards. We’re thankful to the judges for recognizing that what we’re doing is special.” AR|PR in 2016: A Banner Year for Awards & Recognition Technology Public Relations Agency of the Year recognition concludes a banner year of awards for the tech PR and marcomm agency. In November, AR|PR was named a TOP Places to Work in PR by PR News in what that organization cited as its most competitive year for entries ever. The month prior, AR|PR earned recognition as a Best Places to Work by the Atlanta Business Chronicle (ABC), ranking fifth in the small business category out of 50 finalists and more than 600 applicants. Earlier in 2016, the ABC also named AR|PR one of Atlanta’s fastest growing companies based on revenue and job creation. Most importantly, AR|PR won more than 10 national awards and accolades, from organizations including PRSA, PR Daily, and Hermes, for its client work. “As a veteran of high-profile tech PR agencies, I can say firsthand that the client results we achieve each week are so extraordinary that we are fundamentally changing what tech companies’ expect of their PR and marketing partner,” said Evan Goldberg, ARPR’s vice president of client service. “While legacy agencies remain focused on the billable hour and other antiquated processes and procedures, AR|PR has focused on innovation, introducing marketing automation, SEO and client service initiatives that continually wow clients and push the limits of what a tech PR firm can achieve.” To learn more about AR|PR’s current client roster, awards and services, and to read our recent tech marketing resources, visit http://www.arpr.co. Click here to sign up to learn about the agency’s upcoming San Francisco market launch. About AR|PR  AR|PR is a results-driven public relations and integrated communications agency for technology leaders. As one of the nation’s fastest growing technology PR firms, AR|PR was named the 2016 National Tech Public Relations Agency of the Year by Bulldog Reporter and a 2016 TOP Places to Work in PR by PR News. With a passion for telling technology and entrepreneurial stories, AR|PR cultivates strategic partnerships with its cybersecurity, mission critical, health IT, mobility and Software-as-a-Service (SaaS) clients. From high-growth startups to publicly traded enterprises, AR|PR helps companies within these industries cut through the noise and clutter to #makenews and #driveleads. For more information on the award-winning agency, visit its offices in Atlanta and New Orleans and online at arpr.co and @AR__PR.

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