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Aartselaar, Belgium
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News Article | May 10, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Asphalt contractors researching construction equipment purchases can find the industry’s preferred products, courtesy of the editors of Asphalt Contractor, the premier magazine dedicated to asphalt producers and contractors, and the visitors to ForConstructionPros.com, the construction industry's #1 web portal. The 2017 Top 30 Editor’s Choice Awards are chosen by the Asphalt Contractor editorial staff for meeting a set of criteria including longevity and consistency in the market, dependability, productivity and innovation. To gauge the audience’s preferences, they also factored in how much interest these products received on the New Equipment Directory at ForConstructionPros.com/Directory. “Equipment is the lifeblood of our readers’ businesses ‒ the right equipment choices can mean the difference between a profit or a loss on a project,” says Amy Schwandt, group publisher. Asphalt Contractor Editor Lisa Cleaver added, “On today’s road building projects, asphalt contractors need every advantage available. Having the best equipment in their fleets and tools in their toolboxes make them more competitive. This year’s Top 30 Editor’s Choice Awards reflect those products that have the ability to add profits and increase productivity. The list includes several exciting new introductions that offer the latest innovations. To honor the products that achieve these ideals, we offer this year’s Top 30 Editor’s Choice Awards.” Asphalt Contractor, produced by AC Business Media, congratulates the following companies and products identified as the 2017 Top 30 Editor’s Choice Awards. Additional information on the winning products can be found in the May issue of Asphalt Contractor. Astec Industries Silobot Atlas Copco FleetLink Bergkamp Inc. M310CS Paver BOMAG Americas BM 2000/75, BM 2200/75 Cold Planers Aquafin Pavemend Caterpillar Inc. PM 620/PM 622 Cold Planers Carlson Paving Products CP130 Paver Asphalt Drum Mixers EX120 Asphalt Plant Dillman Equipment Nomad Gencor Industries Trifecta HAMM Easy Drive Trimble Mobile Imaging System GSSI PaveScan Almix DuoDrums Eagle Crusher Inc. RapidDeploy KPI-JCI and Astec Mobile Screens Fast Pack Libra Systems Corp. Web Services Meeker Equipment Liquid Vision Road Science ArrMuls Tack Technology Roadtec MTV-1100e Sakai America Inc. SW754 Roller SealMaster Liquid Road Vögele Super 1700-3i/1703-3i Pavers Volvo DD105 OSC Compactor Wirtgen America Inc. WR Series Cold Recyclers Kleemann Spective Control System Airmar Technology Corp. WX Series WeatherStation Topcon Positioning Systems SmoothRide Biospan Technologies Inc. ACTIVATE URC Ventures Inc. Stockpile Reports About Asphalt Contractor magazine Published 10 times each year by AC Business Media, Asphalt Contractor magazine focuses on the latest technological innovations that affect the entire life cycle of asphalt pavements – from production to paving to preservation – in every issue. About AC Business Media AC Business Media is a leading B2B media and business intelligence company with a portfolio of renowned brands in heavy construction, asphalt, concrete, paving, rental, sustainability, landscape, manufacturing, logistics and supply chain markets. AC Business Media delivers relevant, cutting-edge content to its audiences through its industry-leading digital properties, trade shows, videos, magazines, webinars and newsletters and provides advertisers the analytics, data and ability to reach their target audience.


News Article | November 27, 2016
Site: www.gizmag.com

Global efforts to extract energy from sewage in forms such as heat, biogas and even electricity may get a boost thanks to the work of a team of biochemists and microbiologists from Ghent University in Belgium, who are collaborating on a pilot project with DC Water in Washington DC. Sewage from bathrooms and kitchens is a potential energy source because it contains various organic substances suspended in wastewater. If we want sewage treatment to be truly self-sustaining, the trick will be to find an efficient way to separate the organic matter from the wastewater – that way the wastewater can be recycled, and the organic matter can be used to generate bioenergy. Currently, the overall principle of most sewage treatment plants revolves around optimizing the way microorganisms such as bacteria, fungi and protozoans feed on the organic contaminants in wastewater. As the microorganisms eat the organic matter, they form particles that clump together and settle at the bottom of a tank, allowing a relatively clear liquid to be separated from the solids and further purified. This often includes a step called "contact stabilization," which involves using two aeration tanks to ensure the microorganisms are as active as possible before introducing them to the next batch of effluent needing treatment. At the moment, the overall sewage treatment process recovers around 20 to 30 percent of the organic matter within the sewage mix. Dr Francis Meerburg, a researcher on the Belgian project, said their aim was to improve the way bacteria captures organic material. "We periodically starve the bacteria, in a kind of 'fasting regimen'," explains Professor Nico Boon. "Afterwards, wastewater is briefly brought into contact with the starved bacteria which are gluttonous and gobble up the organic matter without ingesting all of it. This enables us to harvest the undigested materials for the production of energy and high-quality products. We [then] starve the rest of the bacteria, so they can purify fresh sewage again." This new method can recover more than 55 percent of the organic matter from the sewage, which is a big improvement over current rates of 20 to 30 percent. According to the team's calculations, this amount should provide enough energy to completely treat sewage without the need for external electricity sources. "We're not going to solve climate change with our process, but every bit helps," Vlaeminck says. "For comparison: in our region of six million people (in Flanders), the energy usage of our sewage treatment municipality, Aquafin, corresponds to the residential electricity use of more than 690,000 people (more than 10 percent of the population). This gives an idea on the energy saving potential and impact, if all sewage treatment would be energy neutral." As a clear sign that there's a strong appetite for more efficient, affordable and sustainable processes in wastewater treatment, the team's work has gone directly from the lab to a large-scale application in the USA's capital city. The researchers are currently collaborating with DC Water (the District of Columbia Water and Sewer Authority) to implement the new process on a part of the plant's full-scale water treatment installation. The next step is to evaluate how well the process can help achieve more efficient wastewater treatment on a large scale.


Fenu A.,Aquafin | Roels J.,Aquafin | Wambecq T.,Aquafin | de Gussem K.,Aquafin | And 3 more authors.
Desalination | Year: 2010

A calibrated dynamic biological ASM model of a full scale membrane bioreactor (MBR) was used to analyze the energy costs of different compartments and devices. The overall energy consumption (0.64 kWh/m 3 of permeate) of the studied MBR in Schilde (Belgium) was good compared to other full scale municipal MBR plants. It is however still much higher than conventional activated sludge (CAS) treatment (0.3 kWh/m 3). Energy demands of the full scale MBR system were compared with a treatment train believed to deliver a comparable effluent quality: CAS followed by Ultrafiltration and UV. It was concluded that from an energy perspective the MBR technology is not yet sufficiently competitive. The MBR technology leads to process specificities which all impact on the energy consumption. While the higher MLSS concentrations implied significant mixing energy costs and reduced oxygen transfer, the smaller floc size did not reflect in a significant aeration energy saving. The impact of the filtration process on the overall energy consumption could be reduced if the coarse aeration flow would be better integrated in the biological process scheme of submerged MBRs. However this work indicates a minimal contribution of the coarse aeration flow to the biological oxygen requirements. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


De Gussem K.,Aquafin | Wambecq T.,Aquafin | Roels J.,Aquafin | Fenu A.,Aquafin | And 2 more authors.
Water Science and Technology | Year: 2011

An ASM2da model of the full-scale waste water plant of Bree (Belgium) has been made. It showed very good correlation with reference operational data. This basic model has been extended to include an accurate calculation of environmental footprint and operational costs (energy consumption, dosing of chemicals and sludge treatment). Two optimisation strategies were compared: lowest cost meeting the effluent consent versus lowest environmental footprint. Six optimisation scenarios have been studied, namely (i) implementation of an online control system based on ammonium and nitrate sensors, (ii) implementation of a control on MLSS concentration, (iii) evaluation of internal recirculation flow, (iv) oxygen set point, (v) installation of mixing in the aeration tank, and (vi) evaluation of nitrate setpoint for post denitrification. Both an environmental impact or Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) based approach for optimisation are able to significantly lower the cost and environmental footprint. However, the LCA approach has some advantages over cost minimisation of an existing full-scale plant. LCA tends to chose control settings that are more logic: it results in a safer operation of the plant with less risks regarding the consents. It results in a better effluent at a slightly increased cost. © IWA Publishing 2010.


Wambecq T.,Aquafin | Fenu A.,Aquafin | De Gussem K.,Aquafin | Parmentier G.,Aquafin | And 2 more authors.
Water and Environment Journal | Year: 2013

This study quantifies the impact of the oxidation ditch horizontal water velocity on the energy consumption of a full-scale wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). A WWTP was modelled by means of the ASM2d platform, showing very good correlation with reference operational data. As to reduce the energy requirements of the plant while guarantying the same nutrient removal performance, two approaches were used. A classical aeration control optimization, yielding a 4% energy reduction, was compared with an increase of the oxidation ditch propelling power. The horizontal water velocity in the oxidation ditches was estimated at only 0.15m/s. By increasing the horizontal water velocity to 0.3m/s, an 8% energy reduction could be achieved. Moreover, a synergistic effect for classic control optimization and oxidation ditch water velocity optimization resulted in a 14% energy reduction. Energy spent in propelling power counteracts the aeration energy gain derived by an increase in the oxidation ditch horizontal velocity. An optimum in the water velocity was quantified at 0.3m/s, comparably with its design value. © 2012 CIWEM.


De Gussem K.,Aquafin | Fenu A.,Aquafin | Wambecq T.,Aquafin | Weemaes M.,Aquafin
Water Science and Technology | Year: 2014

This work provides a case study on how activated sludge modelling and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) can help to optimize the energy consumption of a treatment plant that is already equipped with an advanced control based on online nutrient measurements. Currently, aeration basins on wastewater treatment plant Antwerp-South are operated sequentially while flow direction and point of inflow and outflow vary as a function of time. Activated sludge modelling shows that switching from the existing alternating flow based control to a simultaneous parallel feeding of all aeration tanks saves 1.3% energy. CFD calculations also illustrate that the water velocity is still sufficient if some impellers in the aeration basins are shutdown. The simulations of the Activated Sludge Model No. 2d indicate that the coupling of the aeration control with the impeller control, and automatically switching off some impellers when the aeration is inactive, can save 2.2 to 3.3% of energy without affecting the nutrient removal efficiency. On the other hand, all impellers are needed when the aeration is active to distribute the oxygen. © IWA Publishing 2014.


Fenu A.,Aquafin | Wambecq T.,Aquafin | Thoeye C.,Aquafin | de Gueldre G.,Aquafin | van de Steene B.,Aquafin
Desalination and Water Treatment | Year: 2011

A calibrated ASM2d model of a full scale MBR is modified as to include the soluble microbial products (SMPs) fractions and study their dynamics in full scale. Batch tests were conducted to estimatethe SMP kinetics. The biomass associated products (BAPs) kinetics were estimated with results in tune with previous experiments. The utilization associated products (UAP) kinetics estimation was instead complicated by two aspects which regularly occur when spiking readily biodegradable COD: storage phenomena (not accountable in ASM2d); the non-uniformity between the polysaccharide fraction, easily biodegradable, and the protein fraction, which proved to be refractory to biodegradation. The procedure for UAP kinetics estimation would thus require further analysis. UAPs were found in full scale markedly predominant compared to the BAPs. The data analysisrevealed that the membrane rejection mechanism was identified as SMP loading rate dependent, emphasizing the need of a more careful consideration towards this parameter when working in a dynamic environment. The work discusses the feasibility of the SMP extension studies in dynamic conditions. Fine tuning of the membrane rejection factor, the necessity of more frequent sampling, and experimental determination of the additional kinetics SMP parameters become necessary and burdensome adaptations of the ASM calibrations. However both nutrients removal, sludge production and energy consumption modelling were not improved by including the SMP fraction in the modelling. SMPs did not correlate with fouling rates in this full scale MBR, indicating a strong drawback, since the main drive for these models is thus not accomplished. © 2011 Desalination Publications. All rights reserved.


Abdel-Aal M.,University of Bradford | Smits R.,Aquafin | Mohamed M.,University of Bradford | De Gussem K.,Aquafin | And 2 more authors.
Water Science and Technology | Year: 2014

Modelling of wastewater temperatures along a sewer pipe using energy balance equations and assuming steady-state conditions was achieved. Modelling error was calculated, by comparing the predicted temperature drop to measured ones in three combined sewers, and was found to have an overall root mean squared error of 0.37 K. Downstream measured wastewater temperature was plotted against modelled values; their line gradients were found to be within the range of 0.9995- 1.0012. The ultimate aim of the modelling is to assess the viability of recovering heat from sewer pipes. This is done by evaluating an appropriate location for a heat exchanger within a sewer network that can recover heat without impacting negatively on the downstream wastewater treatment plant (WWTP). Long sewers may prove to be more viable for heat recovery, as heat lost can be reclaimed © IWA Publishing 2014.


Fenu A.,Aquafin | Fenu A.,University of Antwerp | De Wilde W.,Aquaplus | Gaertner M.,Aquafin | And 4 more authors.
Journal of Membrane Science | Year: 2012

The membrane life-time has a strong impact on competitivity and viability of MBRs. This study critically analyzes the membrane life-time concept, approaching it through different assessment methods. A full scale MBR's membrane life-time was assessed on the following: (i) maintaining the permeate flow throughput to the MBR; (ii) the permeability decline; (iii) oxidative aging; (iv) the increase in energy costs; and (v) mechanical aging.The method based on permeability decline provides a membrane life-time estimate up to a theoretical end. It was further elaborated inherently to operations with no long-term flux decline. The increase in operating pressure remains the main end-of-life trigger for deciding when to replace membrane modules.On the contrary, mechanical and permeate flow throughput analysis of the data are not able to provide a clear estimate of the membrane life-time. As for the membrane life-time estimation based on chlorine contact, it was found to be too optimistic. Complete irreversible fouling occurs before maximum contact time with chlorine is reached.At end-of-life operating conditions, the energy consumption raised of 170% due to the reduced flow rate. The cost raise appears high but still affordable. Earlier membrane replacement thus can never be counterbalanced by energy costs saving. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.


PubMed | Aquafin
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Water science and technology : a journal of the International Association on Water Pollution Research | Year: 2011

An ASM2da model of the full-scale waste water plant of Bree (Belgium) has been made. It showed very good correlation with reference operational data. This basic model has been extended to include an accurate calculation of environmental footprint and operational costs (energy consumption, dosing of chemicals and sludge treatment). Two optimisation strategies were compared: lowest cost meeting the effluent consent versus lowest environmental footprint. Six optimisation scenarios have been studied, namely (i) implementation of an online control system based on ammonium and nitrate sensors, (ii) implementation of a control on MLSS concentration, (iii) evaluation of internal recirculation flow, (iv) oxygen set point, (v) installation of mixing in the aeration tank, and (vi) evaluation of nitrate setpoint for post denitrification. Both an environmental impact or Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) based approach for optimisation are able to significantly lower the cost and environmental footprint. However, the LCA approach has some advantages over cost minimisation of an existing full-scale plant. LCA tends to chose control settings that are more logic: it results in a safer operation of the plant with less risks regarding the consents. It results in a better effluent at a slightly increased cost.

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