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Wageningen, Netherlands

Grant
Agency: Narcis | Branch: Project | Program: Completed | Phase: Agriculture | Award Amount: | Year: 2007

Research objectives:
In Dutch areas with a concentration of glasshouse horticulture the water quality is beneath the criteria frequently, due to the emissions of pesticides. There is a lack of good quantative data about de emission flows and the impact to the water quality. Aim of the project is to quantify these emission flows and to explore alternative ways to reduce the emission of the pesticides


Grant
Agency: Narcis | Branch: Project | Program: Completed | Phase: Agriculture | Award Amount: | Year: 2006

Research objectives:
The sectors of herbaceous perennials and flowering perennials are very diverse. As a result of the many different crops there are many different disease and pest problems. Following a systems approach this project addresses the major soil disease problems (i.e. nematodes and soil insects) on the one hand and the main above ground disease (downy mildew) on the other hand.

Results and products:
Whenever possible the research is done in cooperation with similar research in other programmes. Results include information on the use of different techniques to control nematodes and soil insects in these perennial crops; data on host ranges of Meloidogyne and strategies to control downy mildew and soil insects


Grant
Agency: Narcis | Branch: Project | Program: Completed | Phase: Agriculture | Award Amount: | Year: 2006

Description:
Roses are susceptible to several insects and diseases. Integrated pest management (IPM) is developed for most of the specific diseases and pests. IPM is a decision-making process which includes scouting, damage-threshold decisions, control options, and timing of pesticide application. IPM practices reduce non-target effects on beneficial insects and permit control decisions based on pest species and the most vulnerable stage in its life history.

Research objectives:
The objective of this research is to integrate all these IPM tools and make them work in the culture of field grown roses.

Results and products:
This results in a culture of roses which is less vulnerable to pests and diseases and so the dependency of pesticides will decline


Runia W.T.,Applied Plant Research
Communications in agricultural and applied biological sciences | Year: 2012

With increasing worldwide restrictions for soil fumigants, growers loose an important tool to control soilborne pests and pathogens. Environmentally friendly alternatives are urgently needed and anaerobic soil disinfestation (ASD) may be one of them. Traditional ASD with fresh grass is already applied in open field vegetables but the mode of action is unknown. Therefore, trials were performed under controlled conditions using soil-filled buckets, in which several processed defined organic materials were incorporated and compared with fresh grass. The effect of inundation was also studied. Target organisms were Pratylenchus penetrans, Meloidogyne hapla, Globodera pallida and Verticillium dahliae. Results showed that grass (traditional ASD) was less effective than the organic materials. All materials proved to be effective at 16 degrees C against all target organisms. However, exposure time, dosages, soil type and the temperature at which the experiments were performed influenced the effectiveness. P. penetrans was eliminated most easily whereas V. dahliae was most difficult to control. Efficacy was higher in sandy soil than in light marine clay. Inundation at 16 degrees C proved to be effective against P. penetrans and G. pallida in both soil types at sufficient exposure times. A soil temperature of 8 degrees C was sometimes too low for efficacy. Gas production of CO2, NH3, H2S, CH4 and N2O and gas consumption of O2 and production of fatty acids during ASD proved to depend on type of organic materials, soil type, temperature, dosage and exposure time. This first step in unravelling the mode of action has already shown several critical parameters for efficacy. Additional knowledge about the complete mechanisms of action may lead to a more reliable, effective and quicker soil disinfestation. Source


Wenneker M.,Applied Plant Research
Communications in agricultural and applied biological sciences | Year: 2011

In the Netherlands, bacterial canker in plum trees (Prunus domestica) is a serious and recent problem in plum production. It is caused by Pseudomonas syringae pathovars syringae and morsprunorum. The trunks of the affected plum trees are girdled by bacterial cankers resulting in sudden death of infected trees in 3-4 years after planting. Disease incidences can be very high, and sometimes complete orchards have to be removed. Recently, plum cultivation in the Netherlands has changed from a relatively extensive into an intensive cultivation. However, due to the risks of losses of trees due to bacterial canker, growers are reluctant to plant new plum orchards. In general nurseries and fruit growers are not familiar with bacterial diseases and lack knowledge in order to prevent infections. Therefore, control strategies to manage plum decline have to be developed. Source

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