Austin, TX, United States
Austin, TX, United States

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Grant
Agency: Department of Agriculture | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 99.99K | Year: 2015

There are several diseases that are attacking citrus crops world-wide. The citrus industry desperately needs early detection of these infections. However, there are no low-cost, robust diagnostic tests currently available for early identification of citrus diseases under field conditions. This proposal directly responds to the need to reduce the impact of plant diseases and insect pests on citrus crops by developing a means of early detection.Canine detection of citrus diseases is now being applied and shown to be effective. Canine detection is dependent on the recognition of the unique odor signatures. We are proposing to develop a low-cost (< $2 per sample) odor sampling test-kit that will be user-friendly and applicable to both grove owners as well as residential owners who have citrus on their residential property. We propose to develop a sampling technology and process that does not require highly trained technicians and expensive equipment.Rapid and early detection of the citrus deseases will limit the spread of these diseases and lower the cost of citrus production.


Patent
Ishihara Chemical Co. and Applied Nanotech, Inc. | Date: 2014-06-04

An object is to provide a copper particulate dispersion which is suited to discharge in the form of droplets. The copper particulate dispersion includes copper particulates, at least one kind of a dispersion vehicle containing the copper particulates, and at least one kind of dispersant which allows the copper particulates to disperse in the dispersion vehicle. The copper particulates have a center particle diameter of 1 nm or more and less than 100 nm. The dispersion vehicle is a polar dispersion vehicle having a boiling point within a range from 150C to 250C. Whereby, when the copper particulate dispersion is discharged in the form of droplets, clogging at the discharge portion caused by drying of the dispersion vehicle is prevented and the viscosity is low for its high boiling point, and thus the copper particulate dispersion is suited to discharge in the form of droplets.


Patent
Ishihara Chemical Co. and Applied Nanotech, Inc. | Date: 2014-10-08

An object is to provide a conductive film forming method which can form a conductive film having low electric resistance on a base material by utilizing photo sintering even when the base material has low heat resistance. A conductive film forming method is a method in which a conductive film 2 is formed on a base material 1, and the method includes the steps of forming a film 3b composed of copper particulates 4 on a base material, subjecting the film 3b to photo sintering, and applying plating to the photo-sintered film 3c. Whereby, it is possible to form a conductive film 2 on a base material 1 by lowering irradiation energy of light in photo sintering even when the base material 1 has low heat resistance. Since the conductive film 2 includes a plated layer 21, electric resistance decreases.


Patent
Ishihara Chemical Co. and Applied Nanotech, Inc. | Date: 2014-06-04

An object is to provide the formulation of a copper particulate dispersion in which copper particulates are dispersed. The copper particulate dispersion includes copper particulates, at least one kind of a dispersion vehicle containing the copper particulates, and at least one kind of dispersant which allows the copper particulates to disperse in the dispersion vehicle. The copper particulates have a center particle diameter of 1 nm or more and less than 100 nm. The dispersion vehicle is a polar dispersion vehicle. The dispersant is a compound having at least one acidic functional group, which has a molecular weight of 200 or more and 100,000 or less, or a salt thereof. Whereby, the dispersant has compatibility with dispersion vehicle and a surface of copper particulates is coated with dispersant molecules, and thus the copper particulates are dispersed in the dispersion vehicle.


Patent
Applied Nanotech, Inc. | Date: 2015-01-15

Conductive patterns are formed using formulations containing metallic particles, which may be copper. These metallic particles may be coated with a binder material that improves adhesion during photosintering of the formulations. The binder contains chemistry suitable for it to be removed from the particles in a separate process such as drying or thermal sintering. The coating is a non-volatile organic compound attached to the metallic particles with a minimum thickness oxide coating. The organic coating improves a coefficient of thermal expansion value match between the metallic particles and the substrate, which may be polymeric.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Navy | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 149.97K | Year: 2014

Applied Nanotech, Inc. proposes to partner with a leading thin-silicon solar cell manufacturer to develop highly flexible, dielectric backplane materials. ANI and its partner will take advantage of the flexibility of thin-silicon and work to provide support solutions that have excellent adhesion and do suffer from delamination. The thin-silicon technology can currently produce solar cells with greater than 200W/m2 power density. The focus of this SBIR will be to demonstrate reliability and flexibility for field deployable applications.


Grant
Agency: National Aeronautics and Space Administration | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 744.50K | Year: 2014

Thermal Transfer is a critical part of power electronics application in both terrestrial and space environments. Due to longer lifetime expectancies and harsh operational conditions, space vehicles require unique materials to deal with the increasing electrical and thermal loads placed upon the structure. Increasing use of power electronics including high current carrying semiconductor devices such as IGBTs, MOSFETs, power transistors, and modules drive the need for specialty thermal management materials both in the packaging of the discrete devices as well as for the packaging of modules consisting of several or arrays of these devices. The overall objective of this program (Phase II) is to adapt CarbAlTM-based advanced thermal management substrates from terrestrial to space applications. ANI will target improved CarbAl™-based heatsinks and thermally conductive circuit boards for power electronic applications. CarbAl™ is a carbon-based thermal composite with a thermal performance exceeding that of many metals. The low CTE provides excellent matching to state-of-the-art power transistor dies and the low density and robustness make it suitable for space vehicle applications. The proposed Phase I program is a continuation of the materials development completed internally at ANI. If successful, the technology developed through this project will provide and accurate, robust, reliable and cost effective.


Grant
Agency: Department of Agriculture | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 599.99K | Year: 2016

Huanglongbing (HLB) is a pathogen that devastates citrus crops; growers and public response agencies need a portable, sensitive, in-field device to detect this pathogen in citrus crops. However, there are no low-cost, robust diagnostic tests currently available for early identification of this or other citrus pathogens under field conditions. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) testing is the current regulatory decision-making standard for detection of HLB in citrus. qPCR has an evidence-based threshold value that is conservative enough to avoid excess false positives that could undermine trust. However, for decision-making by a grower, qPCR is not ideal. Early diagnosis is difficult to achieve because of highly non-uniform distribution of the bacteriumin a tree and there are seasonal and cultivar variations in bacterial llevels.There are strong motivations to find diagnostic processes that are based on changes in the plant that are induced systemically throughout the plant, making sampling less problematic. This programdirectly responds to the need to reduce the impact of plant pathogens and insect pests on citrus crops by developing a means of early detection. One approach that we are taking is analysis of the odor provide of healthy and diseased trees. We will develop an odorsampling protocol that will be low-cost and user-friendly, applicable to both grove owners as well as residential owners who have citrus on their residential property. We propose to develop a sampling technology and process that does not require highly-trained technicians and expensive equipment. This program will develop robust HLB signature libraries targeting accuracies of 0.9 or better on a tool that will have high throughput and be automated for low-cost operation (about 1/3 the cost of current qPCR testing).


Grant
Agency: Department of Energy | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2016

For low-energy nuclear physics research, isotopic carbon targets, 12C and 13C are requested in thicknesses about 1 mg/cm2 but are commercially unavailable. Neutron-rich isotopic 14C targets are in high demand AT ANY THICKNESS. This program is intended to develop a material-efficient means of providing these targets for DOE and other customers. Applied Nanotech will develop a means of converting existing stock of material, which is in an amorphous carbon powder format, into a graphitic structure such that graphene-oxide inks can be made. Once in a graphene ink format, these inks can be used to make carbon foil targets using technology previously developed in a previous DOE SBIR program (DE-SC0000852). 12-Carbon and 13-Carbon targets will be made in the Phase I program. The amorphous carbon powder will be heated to high temperature in an inert gas oven to convert the carbon powders to the graphene carbon phase. Then Applied Nanotech will use this material to make a graphene oxide ink that is then used to make the target, then the oxide is reduced to leave only graphene phase. Phase II will develop the means of making 14-Carbon target at Argonne National Lab or other DOE lab since this material is radioactive. This program will develop much needed carbon-based targets for nuclear physics applications. Applied Nanotech will develop the targets from carbon isotopes 12C, 13C and 14C that will use existing stock of these materials very efficiently since some of these materials exist in very small quantities. Commercial Applications and Other Benefits: The carbon isotope targets are primarily used in nuclear physics particle beam accelerators. Some of these accelerators are at DOE labs (Brookhaven, Argonne) but others are at universities and non-profit institutions. Targets made from natural carbon have application in medical accelerators used to make radioactive pharmaceuticals for medical imaging and radiology treatments.


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 224.98K | Year: 2014

DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Alcohol abuse is rampant in the U.S., estimates run as high as 1 in 20 adults, and cost tens of billions of dollars in treatment and economic loss. One especially intransigent problem has been alcohol-induced organ disease such as alcoholic hepatitis and cirrhosis. These diseases can currently be diagnosed, but this requires invasive procedures such as liver biopsy, which are typically not applied until the disease process is in a late stage. Late detection of organ disease leads to substantially worse outcomes. Organs affected by alcohol, such as the liver, are highly metabolically active, and the compounds produced by the organs are often volatile and therefore appear in the breath. Breath odor profiles are altered by disease processes, for example the clinical odor syndrome called fetor hepaticus in liver disease, and are composed of many compounds which are altered by many metabolic processes, not just the disease process. To determine the exact disease process respons

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