Pontypool, United Kingdom
Pontypool, United Kingdom

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Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: BSG-SME | Phase: SME-1 | Award Amount: 1.47M | Year: 2011

The project aims to continue with some exciting work following up a development in delivering active agents to bivalve molluscs through micro-encapsulation. The early work showed that bacteria with a potential in vitro to break down some algal toxins could be effectively delivered to the gut of the bivalve. The size and nature of the micro-capsule (bead) was shown to be key. The SMEs and Other industry partners in the consortium have assempled a group of leading researchers in the field to develop this work , further, and to look into not only active detoxification but more effective depuration using pro-biotics. The group alsp plan to investigate the use of the beads as carriers of active agents to aid an immunostimulant response against attack by the Bonamia parasite on European (flat) Oysters.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP | Phase: OCEAN 2013.1 | Award Amount: 7.18M | Year: 2013

The objective of the EnviGuard project is to develop a highly specific and precise (i.e. quantitative and qualitative) in situ measurement device for currently hard to measure man-made chemical contaminants and biohazards (toxic microalgae, viruses & bacteria, biotoxins & PCBs) that can be used as an early warning system in aquaculture and as an environmental monitor to assess the good environmental status of the sea in compliance with the MSFD. It will be more cost-efficient than current monitoring devices leading to a clear marketing advantage for the European analytical and research equipment industry. The modular system will consist of three different sensor modules (microalgae/pathogens/ toxins & chemicals) integrated into a single, portable device, which saves, displays and sends the collected data real time to a server by means of mobile data transmission and the internet. EnviGuard will be able to accomplish this also in real-time for a period of at least one week without maintenance in an offshore, marine surrounding. User of EnviGuard can access their data online any time they need to. Potential fields of use are marine environment pollution monitoring, marine research and quality control in seawater aquaculture, a sector in Europe highly occupied by SMEs. The biosensors developed in the project go far beyond the current state-of-the art in terms of accuracy, reliability and simplicity in operation by combining innovations in nanotechnology and molecular science leading to the development cutting edge sensor technology putting European research and highly innovative SMEs in the forefront of quickly developing markets.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: MC-ITN | Phase: FP7-PEOPLE-2012-ITN | Award Amount: 4.01M | Year: 2012

The Marie Curie ITN Cancer Diagnostics: Parallel Sensing of Prostate Cancer Biomarkers (PROSENSE) aims at training a new generation of young scientists in the interdisciplinary techniques and methods required to meet the major challenges in the development of diagnostic tools for prostate cancer. It will bring together training by experts from the biosensor technology area and those from life sciences and medicine that work on cancer biomarker research. PROSENSE is a coordinated research training network involving university groups, R&D sections of small and medium enterprises, research institutes, hospitals and the R&D section of a large enterprise from the biomedical field. PROSENSE is a unique programme bringing together training across disciplines and across sectors, complemented by researcher career development tools. The scientific aspects of PROSENSE are centred around the themes of: 1) Development and study of biomarkers; 2) Detection techniques development; 3) Probe immobilisation and characterisation; 4) System integration and validation. A full programme of cross-disciplinary and cross-sectoral secondments, traning and events will enable PROSENSE to promote interaction, knowledge exchange and collaboration in the multidisciplinary field of biosensor design with the aim of developing improved devices for prostate cancer diagnosis, prognosis and treatments. It will increase understanding of clinical relevance of prostate cancer biomarkers and elucidate how the concurrent analysis of biomarkers can inform therapy; improve sensitivity, selectivity, robustness and speed of biosensing technologies for the simultaneous screening of biomarkers; develop lab-on-a-chip devices requiring minute amounts of clinical samples and increase likelihood of viable fit-for-purpose prostate cancer biosensing products.


Pemberton R.M.,University of the West of England | Rawson F.J.,University of the West of England | Xu J.,University of the West of England | Pittson R.,Gwent Electronic Materials Ltd. | And 4 more authors.
Microchimica Acta | Year: 2010

Microband biosensors were fabricated from a screen-printed water-based carbon ink containing cobalt phthalocyanine redox mediator and glucose oxidase or lactate oxidase enzyme. The microbiosensors were characterised for their ability to monitor ferrocyanide and H2O2 in phosphate buffer solution: sigmoidal cyclic voltammograms, high current density values and steady-state amperometric responses confirmed the existence of radial-diffusion-limiting microelectrode behaviour. The lactate microband biosensors were then used, in conjunction with a screen-printed Ag/AgCl reference and platinum counter electrode, to monitor lactate levels in culture medium, with a linear range of 0.5-5 mM, sensitivity of 20 nA.mM-1, and dynamic range up to >9 mM. The lactate microband biosensors could operate continuously in culture medium over extended times (up to 24 h) at 37 °C. These biosensors were then applied to detect changes in lactate release from cultured cells in response to toxic challenge: m-dinitrobenzene (500 μM) caused a reduction in lactate production by high-passage number HepG2 single cells; D-galactosamine (20 mM) induced release of lactate by HepG2 spheroid cultures. This novel use of microband biosensors in cell culture has the potential for further application in toxicity monitoring, in both environmental and pharmaceutical areas. © 2010 Springer-Verlag.


Pemberton R.M.,University of the West of England | Xu J.,University of the West of England | Pittson R.,Gwent Electronic Materials Ltd. | Drago G.A.,Applied Enzyme Technology Ltd. | And 3 more authors.
Biosensors and Bioelectronics | Year: 2011

Microband biosensors, screen-printed from a water-based carbon ink containing cobalt phthalocyanine redox mediator and glucose oxidase (GOD) enzyme, were used to monitor glucose levels continuously in buffer and culture medium. Five biosensors were operated amperometrically (Eapp of +0.4V), in a 12-well tissue culture plate system at 37°C, using a multipotentiostat. After 24h, a linear calibration plot was obtained from steady-state current responses for glucose concentrations up to 10mM (dynamic range 30mM). Within the linear region, a correlation coefficient (R2) of 0.981 was obtained between biosensor and spectrophotometric assays. Over 24h, an estimated 0.15% (89nmol) of the starting glucose concentration (24mM) was consumed by the microbiosensor. The sensitivity of the biosensor response in full culture medium was stable between pHs 7.3 and 8.4.Amperometric responses for HepG2 monolayer cultures decreased with time in inverse proportionality to cell number (for 0 to 106cell/ml), as glucose was being metabolised. HepG2 3D cultures (spheroids) were also shown to metabolise glucose, at a rate which was independent of spheroid age (between 6 and 15 days). Spheroids were used to assay the effect of a typical hepatotoxin, paracetamol. At 1mM paracetamol, glucose uptake was inhibited by 95% after 6h in culture; at 500μM, around 15% inhibition was observed after 16h. This microband biosensor culture system could form the basis for an in vitro toxicity testing system. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.


Piano M.,Applied Enzyme Technology Ltd. | Serban S.,Gwent Electronic Materials Ltd. | Pittson R.,Gwent Electronic Materials Ltd. | Drago G.A.,Applied Enzyme Technology Ltd. | Hart J.P.,University of the West of England
Talanta | Year: 2010

A biosensor for the measurement of lactate in serum has been developed, which is based on a screen-printed carbon electrode, modified with Meldola's Blue-Reinecke Salt (MBRS-SPCE), coated with the enzyme lactate dehydrogenase NAD+ dependent (from Porcine heart), and NAD+. A cellulose acetate layer was deposited on the top of the device to act as a permselective membrane. The biosensor was incorporated into a commercially available, thin-layer, amperometric flow cell operated at a potential of only +0.05 V vs. Ag/AgCl. The mobile phase consisted of 0.2 M phosphate buffer pH 10 containing 0.1 M potassium chloride solution; a flow rate of 0.8 ml min-1 was used throughout the investigation. The biosensor response was linear over the range 0.55-10 mM lactate; the former represents the detection limit. The precision of the system was determined by carrying out 10 repeat injections of 10 mM l(+)lactic acid standard; the calculated coefficient of variation was 4.28%. It was demonstrated that this biosensor system could be applied to the direct measurement of lactate in serum without pre-treatment; therefore, this would allow high throughput-analysis, at low cost, for this clinically important analyte. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: Innovate UK | Program: | Phase: Feasibility Study | Award Amount: 67.15K | Year: 2014

IMEPRINT-Incorporation of Microencapsulated Enzymes into screen PRINTed carbon graphite inks, aims to assess the feasibility of microencapsulating enzymes and mediators for inclusion in a water based carbon ink. If successful this system will be used to construct biosensors by screen printing. The microencapsulation of enzymes should lead to improved stability of enzymes during the printing process, enhanced enzyme stability and a reduction in the number of printing steps to construct the biosensor. The project thus covers the scope of three technology areas specified in the TSB Formulated Products call, namely formulation for delivery, formulation for stability and formulation for sustainability. This novel application of microencapsulation technology will deliver ingredients precisely to a very specific area on a biosensor. It will improve the stability of all the ingredients encapsulated and replace a solvent based screen printing ink with a water based environmentally friendly one. The use of this novel ink will lead to dramatic savings in labour costs, operating costs and raw material costs for the oroduction of diabetic test strips and other screen printed biosenors.


Brandao D.,Autonomous University of Barcelona | Liebana S.,Applied Enzyme Technology Ltd. | Pividori M.I.,Autonomous University of Barcelona
New Biotechnology | Year: 2015

This paper addresses the novel approaches for the multiplex detection of food poisoning bacteria, paying closer attention to three of the most common pathogens involved in food outbreaks: Salmonella enterica, Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Listeria monocytogenes. End-point and real-time PCR, classical immunological techniques, biosensors, microarrays and microfluidic platforms, as well as commercial kits for multiplex detection of food pathogens will be reviewed, with special focus on the role of magnetic particles in these approaches. Although the immunomagnetic separation for capturing single bacteria from contaminating microflora and interfering food components has demonstrated to improve the performance on these approaches, the integration of magnetic particles for multiplex detection of bacteria is still in a preliminary stage and requires further studies. © 2015 Elsevier B.V.


PubMed | Applied Enzyme Technology Ltd. and Autonomous University of Barcelona
Type: | Journal: Talanta | Year: 2015

This paper addresses a comparative study of immunomagnetic separation of Salmonella using micro and nano-sized magnetic carriers. In this approach, nano (300 nm) and micro (2.8 m) sized magnetic particles were modified with anti-Salmonella antibody to pre-concentrate the bacteria from the samples throughout an immunological reaction. The performance of the immunomagnetic separation on the different magnetic carriers was evaluated using classical culturing, confocal and scanning electron microscopy to study the binding pattern, as well as a magneto-actuated immunosensor with electrochemical read-out for the rapid detection of the bacteria in spiked milk samples. In this approach, a second polyclonal antibody labeled with peroxidase as electrochemical reporter was used. The magneto-actuated electrochemical immunosensor was able to clearly distinguish between food pathogenic bacteria such as Salmonella enterica and Escherichia coli, showing a limit of detection (LOD) as low as 538 CFU mL(-1) and 291 CFU mL(-1) for magnetic micro and nanocarriers, respectively, in whole milk, although magnetic nanoparticles showed a noticeable higher matrix effect and higher agglomeration effect. These LODs were achieved in a total assay time of 1h without any previous culturing pre-enrichment step. If the samples were pre-enriched for 8 h, the magneto immunosensor based on the magnetic nanoparticles was able to detect as low as 1 CFU in 25 mL of milk (0.04 CFU mL(-1)).


PubMed | Applied Enzyme Technology Ltd. and Autonomous University of Barcelona
Type: Journal Article | Journal: New biotechnology | Year: 2015

This paper addresses the novel approaches for the multiplex detection of food poisoning bacteria, paying closer attention to three of the most common pathogens involved in food outbreaks: Salmonella enterica, Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Listeria monocytogenes. End-point and real-time PCR, classical immunological techniques, biosensors, microarrays and microfluidic platforms, as well as commercial kits for multiplex detection of food pathogens will be reviewed, with special focus on the role of magnetic particles in these approaches. Although the immunomagnetic separation for capturing single bacteria from contaminating microflora and interfering food components has demonstrated to improve the performance on these approaches, the integration of magnetic particles for multiplex detection of bacteria is still in a preliminary stage and requires further studies.

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