Stony Brook, NY, United States

Applied DNA Sciences, Inc.

www.adnas.com
Stony Brook, NY, United States
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Patent
Applied DNA Sciences, Inc. and Apdn B.V.I. Inc. | Date: 2013-02-07

This invention provides compositions that have a light emitting reporter linked to biomolecules, preferably, nucleotide oligomers. The light reporter particles are silylated and functionalized to produce a coated light reporter particle, prior to covalently linking the biomolecules to the light reporter particle. The light reporter particles of the invention can be excited by a light excitation source such as UV or IR light, and when the biomolecule is DNA, the attached DNA molecule(s) are detectable by amplification techniques such as PCR.


Patent
Applied DNA Sciences, Inc. | Date: 2014-09-26

Provided are a method and device for marking an article for security, tracking or authentication. The method includes depositing a solution comprising a nucleic acid marker onto at least a portion of the article. The nucleic acid marker may be activated, for example, by adding a functional group to the nucleic acid marker. The activation of the nucleic acid marker may be performed by exposure to alkaline conditions. The method is well suited for marking fibers and textiles, as well as many other items.


The invention provides methods for increasing the recoverability of taggants from an object. The methods include the steps of incorporating a taggant into a solution; mixing the solution including the taggant with a perturbant to form a first perturbant taggant solution; mixing the first perturbant taggant solution with a polymer to form a second perturbant taggant polymer solution; and applying the second perturbant taggant polymer solution to at least a portion of the object to form a taggant-coated object. Methods for authentication of a taggant marked object are also provided.


The invention provides methods for increasing the recoverability of taggants from an object. The methods include the steps of incorporating a taggant into a solution; mixing the solution including the taggant with a perturbant to form a first perturbant taggant solution; mixing the first perturbant taggant solution with a polymer to form a second perturbant taggant polymer solution; and applying the second perturbant taggant polymer solution to at least a portion of the object to form a taggant-coated object. Methods for authentication of a taggant marked object are also provided.


This invention pertains to methods for generating large quantities of DNA security markers by combinatorial variation techniques using polymorphic fragment length DNA for unique identification security marker applications such as explosive ink used in dye/smoke pack and cash carrying boxes.


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Missile Defense Agency | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 974.88K | Year: 2014

Applied DNA Sciences (APDN) has developed a reliable DNA-optical adduct that is impervious to copying and is required by the Defense Logistic Agency (DLA) for the marking of FSC 5962 electronic components. Commercial inks supplemented with optical markers and proprietary APDN DNA, trademarked SigNature DNA, ink provide authentication marks that are of a higher standard relative to other taggant technologies. The proposed research project detailed herein would expand the scope and scale of production of the existing technology platform established in the Phase I SBIR to accommodate as many as 100 component manufacturers. In addition to developing more efficient methods of SigNature DNA application, the proposed research entails the development and construction of an optical reader that could be employed in the field for rapid detection of the SigNature DNA ink marked on a component. Furthermore, in Phase II, the minimal amount of APDN DNA, optical markers, and ink necessary to maintain efficient detection by existing forensic and visual techniques would be investigated and validated. Approved for Public Release 14-MDA-7739 (18 March 14).


Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Missile Defense Agency | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 150.00K | Year: 2013

Biological systems rely upon DNA for identity, indeed, for every aspect of innate function. We utilized botanical genomes as primary DNA source and engineered unique biological markers of SC originality, verifiable anywhere in the supply chain. Formulation stabilizes the marks against the challenges of SC manufacturing and the physicochemical environs that SCs experience. The sensitivity of DNA detection requires infinitesimal quantities of DNA to adequately mark SCs; there is no impact upon manufacturing. There are no limits to the number of unique markers that can be designed, or the quantity of DNA manufactured. Association of the DNA mark with reporter groups allows for rapid screening to detect the presence of DNA markers. When suspicions are elevated, forensic DNA analysis from a simple SC swab can prove originality beyond all doubt. Preliminary results from"Red Team Challenges"support our claim that these marks cannot be copied. This study extends our observations obtained while embedding DNA in the epoxyacrylate inks used to mark SC. We will develop a library of>10,000 marks, extending these marks into new ink formulations and commercial methods of marking in large scale. We will extend our early work on non-ink embedment methods. Stability challenges will be extended.


A method of marking an inventory item includes providing an activatable smoke generator and a reservoir for holding a smoke fluid and adapted to provide a flow of smoke fluid to the generator. The reservoir contains a smoke fluid including a carrier nucleic acid having a uniquely identifiable sequence, and upon activation of the smoke generator, marker smoke is generated and targeted to flow over the inventory item. The method further includes activating the smoke generator to produce the marker smoke including the carrier nucleic acid so as to cause the marker smoke to flow over the inventory item and thereby to detectably mark the inventory item with carrier nucleic acid.


Patent
Applied DNA Sciences, Inc. | Date: 2013-03-15

The invention provides a composition including DNA bonded to a plasma-treated surface, the plasma can be any suitable plasma, such as an argon plasma, a compressed air plasma, a flame-based plasma or a vacuum plasma. Surfaces treatable by the methods of the invention include ceramic, metal, fabric and organic polymer surfaces. The DNA can be any DNA, such as a marker DNA, which can be linear or circular, single-stranded or double stranded and from about 25 bases to about 10,000 bases in length. Also provided is a method of binding DNA to a surface, including the steps of exposing the surface to a plasma to produce a plasma-treated surface; and applying DNA to the plasma-treated surface to produce surface bound DNA on the treated surface. A system for binding DNA to a surface is also disclosed, the system includes a plasma generator adapted to treating a surface with a plasma to produce a plasma-treated surface; and an applicator containing DNA adapted to applying DNA to the plasma-treated surface to produce surface bound DNA on the plasma-treated surface.


Patent
Applied DNA Sciences, Inc. | Date: 2013-03-07

The invention provides methods for stably binding and immobilizing deoxyribonucleic acid onto objects and substrates. The method includes exposing the deoxyribonucleic acid to alkaline conditions, and contacting the deoxyribonucleic acid to the object or substrate. The alkaline conditions are produced by mixing the deoxyribonucleic acid with an alkaline solution having a pH of about 9.0 or higher, and contacting the deoxyribonucleic acid to the substrate. The immobilized DNA can be used as a taggant and can be used in combination with other detectable taggants, such as optical reporters. Methods for authentication of a DNA marked object are also provided.

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