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Schenectady, NY, United States

Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 97.83K | Year: 2005

DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Electric Cell-substrate Impedance Sensing (ECIS) was developed by Applied Bio Physics to study the behavior of cultured cells in real time. Instruments currently find use in over 60 laboratories world wide measuring cell properties such as permeability of cell monolayers, cell migration and cell-ECM interactions. The current ECIS instrumentation is limited to low throughput research endeavors. The long term objective of the proposed research is to advance the ECIS technology to produce instrumentation tailored for high throughput screening (HTS) for drug discovery. If successful, EClS-based instruments will find use in cellbased assays in the pharmaceutical industry to help evaluate literally tens of thousands of test compounds in the search for modern therapeutic drugs. To achieve this, several research aims must be met. First, new manufacturing techniques must be implemented to produce ECIS arrays in a standard 96 well culture platethe mainstay format of HTS endeavors. Next, in consultation with pharmaceutical companies, electronics will be customized to return meaningful ECIS data in a rapid fashion such that arrays may be quickly scanned. Finally, software must be designed to aid researchers in sorting through the abundance of data the instrument will gather to efficiently pinpoint compounds of interest. The 96 well ECIS plate with its array of measuring electrodes is essential to this goal; however, using current manufacturing processes for arrays, these consumable items would be prohibitively expensive. Accordingly, the focus of the Phase I research is to test the feasibility of using automated and relatively inexpensive printed circuit board (PCB) technology for this purpose. To accomplish this, materials and methods to make PCB arrays will be tested for cell culture compatibility, electrode stability under culture conditions and their ability to yield precise ECIS data. At the completion of Phase I, a prototype 96 well ECIS plate will be produced, and Phase II research will continue culminating in a new HTS instrument for drug discovery.


N/A

Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 100.00K | Year: 2000

N/A


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 749.99K | Year: 2008

DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): The long-term objective of the research is to develop and fabricate an instrument that can facilitate the discovery of new drugs via high throughput screening (HTS). ECIS (electric cell-substrate impedance sensing) is a technology developed by Applied BioPhysics to study the behavior of cultured cells in real time. Instruments manufactured by the company currently find use in over 150 laboratories world wide to measure such fundamental cell properties as permeability of cell monolayers, cell migration and cell-extra cellular matrix interactions. The ECIS instrumentation had been limited to low throughput research endeavors where a maximum of 16 individual cell cultures could be monitored. Phase I research culminated in th e development and fabrication of the first 96 well version of ECIS. This instrument is limited to measurements of simple impedance and has a throughput restricted to a single 96 well plate. In spite of these limitations, the ECIS 9600 instrument is now bei ng successfully marketed primarily to academic laboratories. The objective of the Phase II research is to build upon the success of Phase I and create a truly high throughput ECIS system. The new instrument will be capable of monitoring the complex impedan ce of ECIS culture wells over a broad spectrum of AC frequencies. Custom electronics will accommodate rapid data acquisition of large numbers of 96 well plates permitting thousands of individual wells to be screened. The instrument will capitalize upon the power of monitoring complex impedance and will be tailored for two important cell-based assays. One of these assays will involve measurement of cell migration based on an automated ECIS-based wound-healing assay. The other will monitor changes in barrier function of cell layers. None of these important measurements can presently be accomplished in a high throughput assay. The achievement of these goals will involve several steps: development and testing the necessary electronics, design and testing of af fordable consumable arrays specifically tailored for each assay, production of custom software to run assays and manage the large resulting data files, interfacing the ECIS instrumentation with standard robotic plate handlers. Once a complete prototype i nstrument has been fabricated, we will establish two beta test sites where the instrumentation and its software will be thoroughly evaluated and changes implemented to yield the final production unit. In Phase III, the instrument will be used in HTS assays in the pharmaceutical industry, where literally tens of thousands of test compounds will be evaluated in the search for modern therapeutic drugs.


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 0.00 | Year: 2001

DESCRIPTION ( provided by applicant): The ECIS/taxis technology can detect cells that move to a small electrode through an agarose matrix by the resistance that they impart to an electrical circuit as they cover parts of the small electrode. This system is amenable to rapid throughput analysis of cell behavior in the presence of chemokines and other agents that motivate cell movement. This technology has important advantages as an alternative to traditional measures of cell movement. First, it enables the evaluation of cell responses to stimuli without the preestablishment of a specific endpoint. Second, the ECIS/taxis environment more closely reflects the natural biological environment. Third, the data can be quantitatively assessed according to changes in the resistance of the circuit. Our result in the Phase I of this project clearly demonstrate that this technology can be used to measure the response of cells to chemotactic factors and effects of drugs on the chemotactic response. In Phase II of this project, we will develop the protocols that can be used to evaluate the chemotactic and chemokinetic responses of mammalian leukocytes, and the methods of evaluation of prototype antagonists of chemokinesis. PROPOSED COMMERCIAL APPLICATION: The ECIS/taxis technology will be immediately useful in the search for anti-chemotactic agent (anti-inflammatory agents), chemotactic agents (new chemokines), agonists of known chemokines (pro-inflammatory agents), and stimulators of motility (pro-inflammatory agents).


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 243.96K | Year: 2001

DESCRIPTION ( provided by applicant): The ECIS/taxis technology can detect cells that move to a small electrode through an agarose matrix by the resistance that they impart to an electrical circuit as they cover parts of the small electrode. This system is amenable to rapid throughput analysis of cell behavior in the presence of chemokines and other agents that motivate cell movement. This technology has important advantages as an alternative to traditional measures of cell movement. First, it enables the evaluation of cell responses to stimuli without the preestablishment of a specific endpoint. Second, the ECIS/taxis environment more closely reflects the natural biological environment. Third, the data can be quantitatively assessed according to changes in the resistance of the circuit. Our result in the Phase I of this project clearly demonstrate that this technology can be used to measure the response of cells to chemotactic factors and effects of drugs on the chemotactic response. In Phase II of this project, we will develop the protocols that can be used to evaluate the chemotactic and chemokinetic responses of mammalian leukocytes, and the methods of evaluation of prototype antagonists of chemokinesis. PROPOSED COMMERCIAL APPLICATION: The ECIS/taxis technology will be immediately useful in the search for anti-chemotactic agent (anti-inflammatory agents), chemotactic agents (new chemokines), agonists of known chemokines (pro-inflammatory agents), and stimulators of motility (pro-inflammatory agents).

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