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Abdulamir A.S.,University of Baghdad | Jassim S.A.A.,Applied Bio Research Inc. | Abu Bakar F.,University Putra Malaysia
Annals of Clinical Microbiology and Antimicrobials | Year: 2014

Background: This study was conducted to explore new approaches of animal biocontrol via biological control feed.Method: White rats were subjected to 140 highly lytic designed phages specific against E. coli. Phages were fed via drinking water, oral injection, and vegetable capsules. Phage feeding was applied by 24 h feeding with 11d monitoring and 20d phage feeding and monitoring. Group of rats received external pathogenic E. coli and another group did not, namely groups A and B. Results: Phage feeding for 20d via vegetable capsules yielded the highest reduction of fecal E. coli, 3.02 and 4.62 log, in rats group A and B respectively. Second best, feeding for 20d via drinking water with alkali yielded 2.78 and 4.08 log in rats groups A and B respectively. The peak reduction in E. coli output was 5-10 d after phage feeding. Phage control declined after 10th day of feeding. Conclusions: The use of cocktail of designed phages succeeded in suppressing flora or external E. coli. The phage feed biocontrol is efficient in controlling E. coli at the pre-harvest period, precisely at the 6th-8th day of phage feeding when the lowest E. coli output found. © 2014 Abdulamir et al. licensee BioMed Central Ltd. Source


Abdulamir A.S.,University of Baghdad | Jassim S.A.A.,Applied Bio Research Inc. | Jassim S.A.A.,University of Windsor | Hafidh R.R.,University of Baghdad | Bakar F.A.,University Putra Malaysia
Annals of Clinical Microbiology and Antimicrobials | Year: 2015

Background: This study assessed novel approach of using highly lytic phages against methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) biofilms with and without biofilm extracellular matrix- disrupting chemical. Method: The resultant phage-based control was assessed in relation to the type of biofilm extracellular matrix namely, polysaccharide intercellular adhesion (PIA) or proteinacious fibronectin-binding protein A (FnBPA). The biofilms were formed in vitro by 24 h incubation of bacteria in 96 wells microtiter plates at room temperature. The formed biofilms were assessed by tissue culture plate (TCP). Moreover, the nature of the biofilm was assessed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and PCR assay for detecting PIA genes, ciaA-D and FnBPA genes. Results: this study showed that applied phages with 0.08 % benezenthonium chloride, for PIA biofilms, and 0.06 % ethanol, for proteinacious FnBPA biofilms, exerted 100 % eradication for MSSA biofilms and about 78 % of MRSA biofilms. The phage-based control of biofilms with chemical adjuvant showed significantly higher efficiency than that without adjuvant (P < 0.05). Moreover, FnBPA biofilms were more common in MRSA than in MSSA while PIA biofilms were more common in MSSA than in MRSA. And the most resistant type of biofilms to phage-based control was FnBPA in MRSA where 50 % of biofilms were reduced but not eradicated completely. Conclusions: It is concluded that PIA-disturbing agent and protein denaturing alcohol can increase the efficiency of attacking phages in accessing host cell walls and lysing them which in turn lead to much more efficient MRSA and MSSA biofilm treatment and prevention. © 2015 Abdulamir et al. Source


Patent
Applied Bio Research Inc. | Date: 2013-12-27

Described herein are compounds, compositions and methods for the treatment of a subject having cancer, skin conditions, blood flow and/or growth failure. In one aspect of the present invention, there is provided compositions and methods for treating a subject having cancer, skin conditions, blood flow and/or growth failure, comprising fat derived from a camel. There are also described sunscreen and photoprotective compounds, compositions and methods, comprising fat derived from a camel.


Jassim S.A.A.,Applied Bio Research Inc. | Limoges R.G.,Applied Bio Research Inc.
World Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology | Year: 2014

Antibiotics have been a panacea in animal husbandry as well as in human therapy for decades. The huge amount of antibiotics used to induce the growth and protect the health of farm animals has lead to the evolution of bacteria that are resistant to the drug's effects. Today, many researchers are working with bacteriophages (phages) as an alternative to antibiotics in the control of pathogens for human therapy as well as prevention, biocontrol, and therapy in animal agriculture. Phage therapy and biocontrol have yet to fulfill their promise or potential, largely due to several key obstacles to their performance. Several suggestions are shared in order to point a direction for overcoming common obstacles in applied phage technology. The key to successful use of phages in modern scientific, farm, food processing and clinical applications is to understand the common obstacles as well as best practices and to develop answers that work in harmony with nature. © 2014 The Author(s). Source


Jassim S.A.A.,Applied Bio Research Inc. | Limoges R.G.,Applied Bio Research Inc.
World Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology | Year: 2013

Cyanobacterial (algal) blooms have by convention been attributed to the excessive level of nutrients from pollution and runoff, which promotes the rapid growth and multiplication of cyanobacteria or algae. The cyanophage (virus) is the natural predator of cyanobacteria (the host). The aim of this review is to unveil certain pressures that disrupt cyanophage-host interactions and the formation of cyanobacterial blooms. This review focuses principally on the impact of greenhouse gases, ozone depletion, solar ultraviolet radiation (SUR) and the role of recently discovered virophages, which coexist with and in turn are the natural predator of phages. The key findings are that the increase in SUR, the mutation of cyanophages and cyanobacteria, along with changing nutrient levels, have combined with virophages to impede cyanophage-host interactions and the resultant viral infection and killing of the cyanobacterial cell, which is a necessary step in controlling cyanobacterial blooms. Consider this a 'call to action' for researchers interested in corrective action aimed at evolving aquatic ecosystems. © 2013 Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht. Source

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