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Magny-les-Hameaux, France

Arsonnet G.,Geomatech | Baud J.-P.,Eurogeo | Gambin M.,Apageo | Heintz R.,Eurasol
Geotechnical and Geological Engineering | Year: 2014

The borehole expansion test can be used in any ground material, from the softer to the harder one, so as to obtain its stress–strain behaviour in situ. The authors submit their research work on equipment which permits to extend the use of the Ménard pressuremeter up to 25 MPa test pressure. They also give the first test diagrams up to this pressure in slightly fractured rocks. © 2011, The authors and IOS Press, All rights reserved.*. Source


Physical and mechanical properties used to characterize soil and rock are different according to the various approaches and targets of the different activities involved, namely soil mechanics, rock mechanics or engineering geology. The Authors suggest that the data obtained during a borehole expansion test, which can be summarized by a Ménard E-modulus and a limit pressure, be used in an overall classification ranging from loose soils to hard rock without any discontinuity based on the soil Pressiorama® as developed for soils these last 10 years. © 2011, The authors and IOS Press, All rights reserved.*. Source


Arsonnet G.,Geomatech | Baud J.-P.,Eurogeo | Gambin M.,Apageo | Heintz R.,Eurasol
Geotechnical and Geological Engineering | Year: 2013

The bore hole expansion test can be used in any ground material, from the softer to the harder one, so as to obtain its stress-strain behaviour in situ. The authors submit their research work on equipment which permits to extend the use of the Ménard pressuremeter up to 25 MPa test pressure. They also give the first test diagrams up to this pressure in slightly fractured rocks. © 2013 The Author(s). Source


Jean-Pierre B.,Eurogeo | Michel G.,Apageo
Geotechnical and Geological Engineering | Year: 2013

Physical and mechanical properties used to characterize soil and rock are different according to the various approaches and targets of the different activities involved, namely soil mechanics, rock mechanics or engineering geology. The Authors suggest that the data obtained during a borehole expansion test, which can be summarized by a Ménard E-modulus and a limit pressure, be used in an overall classification ranging from loose soils to hard rock without any discontinuity based on the soil Pressiorama® as developed for soils these last 10 years. © 2013 The Author(s). Source


Baud J.-P.,Eurogeo | Gambin M.P.,Apageo | Schlosser F.,University Paris Est Creteil
Geotechnical and Geophysical Site Characterization 4 - Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Site Characterization 4, ISC-4 | Year: 2013

This is the follow-up of a previous work on the hyperbolic Menard PMT curves by two of the three authors of this paper (Baud & Gambin 2007). It includes a review of the research work undertaken since 2007 to date, mostly using special self-boring techniques (Arsonnet, Baud, Gambin 2005) and largely developed since then: a self-bored slotted tube, implemented either by a hydraulic drifter-the original STAF® technique-or by a specific rotary drill-rig-the new ROTOSTAFR technique. A large number of tests results on various soils are submitted which correctly fit the developed hyperbolic model. An original analytic expression of the hyperbolic model ε =?f(G 0, p0, pLM, pL) is demonstrated. Many of these tests are run with a new pressuremeter control unit GeoPacR based on a totally new concept. It permits: a) to smoothly reach the close contact between the probe cover and the borehole wall by a constant fluid rate inflation procedure, and b) to perform the test on a continuous feed-back process during pressure increments. It is shown that for each test, typical curves of the true tangent modulus Gtversus strain ε and Gt/G 0 versus ε, can be obtained. These in situ test results compare well with laboratory and geophysical tests results exhibiting secant or tangent G modulus degradation when the strain increases. © 2013 Taylor & Francis Group. Source

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