AOU San Giovanni Battista Molinette

San Giovanni al Natisone, Italy

AOU San Giovanni Battista Molinette

San Giovanni al Natisone, Italy
SEARCH FILTERS
Time filter
Source Type

Mangia A.,Hospital IRCCS Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza | Cenderello G.,Galliera Hospital | Orlandini A.,Hospital of Parma | Piazzolla V.,Hospital IRCCS Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza | And 16 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2014

Background: Triple therapy including Telaprevir or Boceprevir still represents in many European countries the standard of care for patients with Hepatitis C Virus genotype 1 infection. The number of patients who received this treatment resulted generally lower than expected. We investigated, among naïve patients, number and characteristics of treatment candidates who were started on triple or dual therapy in comparison to those who were deferred.Patients and Methods: 621 naïve treatment candidates were prospectively evaluated at each center. Factors associated with decision to defer or treat with dual or triple therapy were investigated by univariate and multivariate analyses. Rates of Sustained Virological Response and safety profile were analysed.Results: Of candidates to treatment, 33% did not received it. It was mostly due to high risk of Interferon-induced decompensation. Of 397 patients who were started on treatment, 266 (67%) received triple, 131 dual. Among patient receiving treatment, unfavorable IL28B, severe liver damage and higher albumin were independently associated with the physician decision to administer triple therapy. Sustained Virological Response after dual therapy was 66.4%, after triple 73.7% (p=0.14). 142 patients received Telaprevir. The choice of Telaprevir-based therapy was associated with higher Body Mass Index and advanced liver disease. Sustained Virological Response rates were 71.1% after Telaprevir and 76.6% after Boceprevir.Conclusions: Individualizing treatment with available regimens allows to maximize Sustained Virological Response and to reduce the number of patients who remain untreated. High proportion of patients with severe liver damage urgently need Interferon free treatment. © 2014 Mangia et al.


PubMed | Galliera Hospital, University of Genoa, Marche Polytechnic University, Vittorio Emanuele Hospital and 12 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: PloS one | Year: 2014

Triple therapy including Telaprevir or Boceprevir still represents in many European countries the standard of care for patients with Hepatitis C Virus genotype 1 infection. The number of patients who received this treatment resulted generally lower than expected. We investigated, among nave patients, number and characteristics of treatment candidates who were started on triple or dual therapy in comparison to those who were deferred.621 nave treatment candidates were prospectively evaluated at each center. Factors associated with decision to defer or treat with dual or triple therapy were investigated by univariate and multivariate analyses. Rates of Sustained Virological Response and safety profile were analysed.Of candidates to treatment, 33% did not received it. It was mostly due to high risk of Interferon-induced decompensation. Of 397 patients who were started on treatment, 266 (67%) received triple, 131 dual. Among patient receiving treatment, unfavorable IL28B, severe liver damage and higher albumin were independently associated with the physician decision to administer triple therapy. Sustained Virological Response after dual therapy was 66.4%, after triple 73.7% (p=0.14). 142 patients received Telaprevir. The choice of Telaprevir-based therapy was associated with higher Body Mass Index and advanced liver disease. Sustained Virological Response rates were 71.1% after Telaprevir and 76.6% after Boceprevir.Individualizing treatment with available regimens allows to maximize Sustained Virological Response and to reduce the number of patients who remain untreated. High proportion of patients with severe liver damage urgently need Interferon free treatment.


Macripo G.,AOU San Giovanni Battista Molinette | Caliendo V.,AOU San Giovanni Battista Molinette | Grassi M.,AOU San Giovanni Battista Molinette | Lista P.,Centro Oncologico Subalpino COES | And 4 more authors.
Tumori | Year: 2011

We describe the case of a squamous cell carcinoma spreading to the skin and regional lymph nodes from the umbilicus. Bilateral inguinal lymphadenectomy and a session of electrochemotherapy with bleomycin 15mg/m2 were performed.However, because of the development of new cutaneous nodules in the abdominopelvic region, we performed targeted palliative therapy with erlotinib 150 mg/day. Targeted adjuvant therapy was preferred to the use of a major cytotoxic agent because of the high risk of superinfection and heart failure. Erlotinib produced a partial clinical response with reduction of the number and size of the skin nodules. CT scan performed after 60 days of treatment did not show any new lesions. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an umbilicalmetastatic squamous cell carcinoma treated with modern targeted therapy. This therapeutic strategy can be considered a valid palliative option in the management of metastatic cutaneous nodules of this rare primary site.


Lasaponara F.,AOU San Giovanni Battista Molinette | Dalmasso E.,AOU San Giovanni Battista Molinette | Santia S.,AOU San Giovanni Battista Molinette | Sedigh O.,AOU San Giovanni Battista Molinette | And 4 more authors.
Urologia | Year: 2013

INTRODUCTION: Forgotten indwelling ureteral stents can cause significant urological complications. Only few cases are reported after kidney transplantation.MATERIALS AND METHODS: We present a case of a 39-year-old woman, transplanted in 1993 and referred to our Transplant Center 8 years later, because of a serious urinary tract infection with renal function impairment. Abdominal CT scan showed pyelonephritis and hydronephrosis in the transplanted kidney and the presence of a calcific ureteral stent, which had been forgotten in situ for 8 years. The stent was removed, but it was impossible to replace it with a new stent both retrogradely and anterogradely, because of a tight obstruction of the mid ureter. So a uretero-ureteral anastomosis with up urinary tract was performed.RESULTS: No intra- or post-operative complications occurred. At 9 years' follow-up, the patient shows an optimal renal function, with no urinary tract infection.DISCUSSION: A forgotten ureteral stent in a transplanted kidney can cause a lot of complications and can lead to graft loss. The prosthesis may cause an irreversible ureteral damage, so, as in our experience, forgetting a ureteral stent can result in a complex surgery.


According to the last EAU Guidelines about testicular cancer, surgical resection of residual masses after chemotherapy in NSGCT is indicated in the case of visible residual masses and when serum levels of tumor markers are normal or normalizing. If markers are not normalized and when several chemotherapeutic regimens have failed to cure metastatic disease, resection of residual tumors (so called "desperation surgery") should be offered to these patients. We are going to present the case of a 30-year-old patient, affected by metastatic NSGCT. According to the prognostic-based staging system for metastatic germ cell cancer, our patient was in the poor prognosis group. The retroperitoneal mass involved all major vascular structures and still caused a bilateral obstruction of the upper urinary tract. Histological examination after radical orchiectomy revealed embryonal carcinoma and immature teratoma. The patient underwent a four-cycle VIP chemotherapy and then salvage chemotherapy with four cycles of TIP. After chemotherapy, the patient still presented large multiple metastatic localizations. Tumor markers were reduced but not normalized. The patient was then proposed for the resection of residual tumor. The residual mass could not be dissected from the left renal pedicle, so the left nephrectomy was unavoidable. The mass was hardly detached from vena cava and aorta. A bilateral iliac and retroperitoneal lymphadenectomy was performed. At the end of the procedure, the retroperitoneal space was completely free. Post-operative hospital stay was regular. A CT scan performed 3 months after the procedure did not show any residual lesion in the retroperitoneum. Three and six months later, the patient underwent the residual tumor resection of the right mediastinum and then of the left mediastinum and supraclavear metastases. Afterwards the patient underwent an EP consolidation chemotherapy. The patient is alive, 12 months after the retroperitoneal surgery. Our experience confirms that resection of residual tumors is safe and feasible also in cases of very large abdominal disease.


PubMed | AOU San Giovanni Battista Molinette
Type: Case Reports | Journal: Urologia | Year: 2011

According to the last EAU Guidelines about testicular cancer, surgical resection of residual masses after chemotherapy in NSGCT is indicated in the case of visible residual masses and when serum levels of tumor markers are normal or normalizing. If markers are not normalized and when several chemotherapeutic regimens have failed to cure metastatic disease, resection of residual tumors (so called desperation surgery) should be offered to these patients.We are going to present the case of a 30-year-old patient, affected by metastatic NSGCT. According to the prognostic-based staging system for metastatic germ cell cancer, our patient was in the poor prognosis group. The retroperitoneal mass involved all major vascular structures and still caused a bilateral obstruction of the upper urinary tract. Histological examination after radical orchiectomy revealed embryonal carcinoma and immature teratoma. The patient underwent a four-cycle VIP chemotherapy and then salvage chemotherapy with four cycles of TIP. After chemotherapy, the patient still presented large multiple metastatic localizations. Tumor markers were reduced but not normalized. The patient was then proposed for the resection of residual tumor. The residual mass could not be dissected from the left renal pedicle, so the left nephrectomy was unavoidable. The mass was hardly detached from vena cava and aorta. A bilateral iliac and retroperitoneal lymphadenectomy was performed. At the end of the procedure, the retroperitoneal space was completely free.Post-operative hospital stay was regular. A CT scan performed 3 months after the procedure did not show any residual lesion in the retroperitoneum. Three and six months later, the patient underwent the residual tumor resection of the right mediastinum and then of the left mediastinum and supraclavear metastases. Afterwards the patient underwent an EP consolidation chemotherapy. The patient is alive, 12 months after the retroperitoneal surgery.Our experience confirms that resection of residual tumors is safe and feasible also in cases of very large abdominal disease.

Loading AOU San Giovanni Battista Molinette collaborators
Loading AOU San Giovanni Battista Molinette collaborators