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Chan Y.X.,University of Western Australia | Knuiman M.W.,University of Western Australia | Hung J.,University of Western Australia | Divitini M.L.,University of Western Australia | And 4 more authors.
Clinical Endocrinology | Year: 2016

Context: Lower testosterone (T) is associated with poorer health outcomes in older men, however, the relationship between T, dihydrotestosterone (DHT) and estradiol (E2) with cardiovascular disease (CVD) in younger to middle-aged men remains unclear. Objectives: We assessed associations between endogenous sex hormones with mortality (all-cause and CVD) and CVD events, in a cohort of men aged 17-97 years. Participants and methods: Sex hormones were assayed using mass spectrometry in 2143 men from the 1994/5 Busselton Health Survey. Outcomes to December 2010 were analysed. Results: Of the 1804 men included in the analysis, mean age was 50·3 ± 16·8 years and 68·9% of men were aged <60. Mean follow-up period was 14·9 years. There were 319 deaths, 141 CVD deaths and 399 CVD events. Compared to the full cohort, men who died had lower baseline T (12·0 ± 4·4 vs 13·6 ± 4·9 nmol/l), free T (181·9 ± 52·9 vs 218·3 ± 63·8 pmol/l) and DHT (1·65 ± 0·64 vs 1·70 ± 0·72 nmol/l), but higher E2 (64·0 ± 32 vs 60·1 ± 30·2 pmol/l). After adjustment for risk factors, T was not associated with mortality (adjusted HR = 0·90, 95% CI 0·79-1·04; P = 0·164 for every increase in 1 SD of T), CVD deaths (adjusted HR = 1·04, 95% CI 0·84-1·29; P = 0·708) or CVD events (adjusted HR = 1·03, 95% CI 0·92-1·15, P = 0·661). No associations were found for free T, DHT or E2. Results were similar for men older and younger than 60 years. Conclusions: In predominantly middle-aged men, T, DHT and E2 do not influence mortality or CVD outcomes. This neutral association of hormones with CVD contrasts with prior studies of older men. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Source

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