Anxiety Disorders Unit

Christchurch, New Zealand

Anxiety Disorders Unit

Christchurch, New Zealand

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Carter F.A.,Clinical Research Unit | Carter F.A.,University of Otago | Bell C.J.,University of Otago | Bell C.J.,Anxiety Disorders Unit | Colhoun H.C.,Anxiety Disorders Unit
Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry | Year: 2013

Objective: To evaluate the suitability and acceptability of computerised cognitive behaviour therapy (CCBT). Method: Participants were patients who had been referred to a secondary care service in the usual manner, and then offered participation in a randomised controlled trial comparing the efficacy of CCBT with a control condition (waitlist) for patients with a current primary diagnosis of generalised anxiety disorder, panic disorder or social phobia. Data were collected regarding the recruitment and retention of patients, and patient ratings (anchored Likert scales) of treatment credibility, treatment satisfaction, treatment acceptability and telephone support. Results: A total of 1141 referrals were received by the secondary care service. Of the 1141, 748 (66%) were not suitable for the study, 178 (16%) declined to participate and 127 (11%) were not contactable. Therefore, of the 1141 patients referred to the secondary care service, only 88 patients (8%) were eligible and consenting for the study. The single most common reason for patients not being suitable for the study was that the referral was urgent. In a clinical setting where CCBT could be used alongside clinical management, many of these patients may have been suitable for CCBT. Of the patients randomised to treatment (n = 40), 65% completed treatment. Drop-out rates were not significantly different across diagnostic groups. The single most commonly cited reason for not completing treatment was too busy. Patient ratings of treatment were typically favourable (credibility, satisfaction, acceptability and telephone support). Conclusions: CCBT was typically rated favourably by patients referred to a secondary care service and randomised to treatment. However, only a small minority of patients was eligible and consenting for the trial. Therefore, while CCBT may be an acceptable treatment, its suitability for secondary care settings remains unclear. © 2012 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists.


Dorahy M.J.,University of Canterbury | Dorahy M.J.,Belmont Private Hospital | Kannis-Dymand L.,University of The Sunshine Coast | Kannis-Dymand L.,Anxiety Disorders Unit
Journal of Loss and Trauma | Year: 2012

This study aimed to explore posttraumatic distress and the cognitive variables of controllability and predictability in two demographically matched communities differentially affected by the Christchurch earthquake of September 4, 2010 (N = 124). A door-to-door survey was conducted 8-10 weeks after the initial quake. The two communities did not differ on acute stress disorder or symptoms, but the affected community had higher depression and anxiety scores. Depression, feeling on edge, and anxiety scores predicted acute stress symptoms. Uncontrollability of response to aftershocks predicted acute stress, depression, and anxiety symptoms. Results are discussed with reference to the impact of ongoing aftershocks and how they are likely to maintain a sense that responses to them are uncontrollable, which in turn maintains psychological distress. © 2012 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.

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