Colombo, Sri Lanka
Colombo, Sri Lanka

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Galappaththy G.N.L.,National Anti Malaria Campaign | Fernando S.D.,University of Colombo | Abeyasinghe R.R.,World Health Organization
Tropical Medicine and International Health | Year: 2013

Objective: To discuss epidemiological aspects of imported malaria and the potential impact of imported malaria cases reported in Sri Lanka 2008-2011 in terms of a possible resurgence of the disease. Methods: The national malaria database was used to assess details regarding country where the infection was possibly acquired, species of Plasmodium, number of days lapsed between disembarkation in Sri Lanka and diagnosis, compliance with national treatment guidelines including percentage of patients followed up as per the national guidelines. Results: After the strengthening of malaria surveillance, during the 4-year period, 152 imported malaria cases were recorded: an increase of 176% in the number of cases. Most of the imported malaria infections were acquired by Sri Lankan Nationals mainly from South Asia, especially India. Plasmodium vivax accounted for 64% of the infections. Approximately 50% of the cases were diagnosed in the Western Province. The average period from disembarkation in Sri Lanka to malaria diagnosis was 3.6 days. Patients were managed and treated according to the national guidelines. 82% of the patients were followed up for 28 days to ensure parasite clearance. Conclusions: There is a possible increasing risk of re-introduction of malaria to the country from imported cases. Enhanced surveillance activities and the increase in international travel have contributed to an increase in recorded case numbers. There is a need to further strengthen surveillance, especially for monitoring and timely addressing of imported malaria, if the country is to prevent the re-establishment of transmission within. The importance of having an efficient response mechanism to deal with imported malaria is also highlighted. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.


PubMed | National Anti Malaria Campaign
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Tropical medicine & international health : TM & IH | Year: 2013

To discuss epidemiological aspects of imported malaria and the potential impact of imported malaria cases reported in Sri Lanka 2008-2011 in terms of a possible resurgence of the disease.The national malaria database was used to assess details regarding country where the infection was possibly acquired, species of Plasmodium, number of days lapsed between disembarkation in Sri Lanka and diagnosis, compliance with national treatment guidelines including percentage of patients followed up as per the national guidelines.After the strengthening of malaria surveillance, during the 4-year period, 152 imported malaria cases were recorded: an increase of 176% in the number of cases. Most of the imported malaria infections were acquired by Sri Lankan Nationals mainly from South Asia, especially India. Plasmodium vivax accounted for 64% of the infections. Approximately 50% of the cases were diagnosed in the Western Province. The average period from disembarkation in Sri Lanka to malaria diagnosis was 3.6days. Patients were managed and treated according to the national guidelines. 82% of the patients were followed up for 28days to ensure parasite clearance.There is a possible increasing risk of re-introduction of malaria to the country from imported cases. Enhanced surveillance activities and the increase in international travel have contributed to an increase in recorded case numbers. There is a need to further strengthen surveillance, especially for monitoring and timely addressing of imported malaria, if the country is to prevent the re-establishment of transmission within. The importance of having an efficient response mechanism to deal with imported malaria is also highlighted.

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