Entity

Time filter

Source Type


Fontaine A.,Antenne Marseille Of Linstitut Of Recherche Biomedicale Des Armees Irba | Fusai T.,Antenne Marseille Of Linstitut Of Recherche Biomedicale Des Armees Irba | Briolant S.,Antenne Marseille Of Linstitut Of Recherche Biomedicale Des Armees Irba | Buffet S.,University of Monastir | And 8 more authors.
BMC Genomics | Year: 2012

Background: Antibody responses against Anopheles salivary proteins can indicate individual exposure to bites of malaria vectors. The extent to which these salivary proteins are species-specific is not entirely resolved. Thus, a better knowledge of the diversity among salivary protein repertoires from various malaria vector species is necessary to select relevant genus-, subgenus- and/or species-specific salivary antigens. Such antigens could be used for quantitative (mosquito density) and qualitative (mosquito species) immunological evaluation of malaria vectors/host contact. In this study, salivary gland protein repertoires (sialomes) from several Anopheles species were compared using in silico analysis and proteomics. The antigenic diversity of salivary gland proteins among different Anopheles species was also examined. Results: In silico analysis of secreted salivary gland protein sequences retrieved from an NCBInr database of six Anopheles species belonging to the Cellia subgenus (An. gambiae, An. arabiensis, An. stephensi and An. funestus) and Nyssorhynchus subgenus (An. albimanus and An. darlingi) displayed a higher degree of similarity compared to salivary proteins from closely related Anopheles species. Additionally, computational hierarchical clustering allowed identification of genus-, subgenus- and species-specific salivary proteins. Proteomic and immunoblot analyses performed on salivary gland extracts from four Anopheles species (An. gambiae, An. arabiensis, An. stephensi and An. albimanus) indicated that heterogeneity of the salivary proteome and antigenic proteins was lower among closely related anopheline species and increased with phylogenetic distance.Conclusion: This is the first report on the diversity of the salivary protein repertoire among species from the Anopheles genus at the protein level. This work demonstrates that a molecular diversity is exhibited among salivary proteins from closely related species despite their common pharmacological activities. The involvement of these proteins as antigenic candidates for genus-, subgenus- or species-specific immunological evaluation of individual exposure to Anopheles bites is discussed. © 2012 Fontaine et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. Source


Fontaine A.,Antenne Marseille Of Linstitut Of Recherche Biomedicale Des Armees Irba | Pascual A.,Antenne Marseille Of Linstitut Of Recherche Biomedicale Des Armees Irba | Orlandi-Pradines E.,Antenne Marseille Of Linstitut Of Recherche Biomedicale Des Armees Irba | Diouf I.,Antenne Marseille Of Linstitut Of Recherche Biomedicale Des Armees Irba | And 6 more authors.
PLoS ONE | Year: 2011

Mosquito-borne diseases are major health problems worldwide. Serological responses to mosquito saliva proteins may be useful in estimating individual exposure to bites from mosquitoes transmitting these diseases. However, the relationships between the levels of these IgG responses and mosquito density as well as IgG response specificity at the genus and/or species level need to be clarified prior to develop new immunological markers to assess human/vector contact. To this end, a kinetic study of antibody levels against several mosquito salivary gland extracts from southeastern French individuals living in three areas with distinct ecological environments and, by implication, distinct Aedes caspius mosquito densities were compared using ELISA. A positive association was observed between the average levels of IgG responses against Ae. caspius salivary gland extracts and spatial Ae. caspius densities. Additionally, the average level of IgG responses increased significantly during the peak exposure to Ae. caspius at each site and returned to baseline four months later, suggesting short-lived IgG responses. The species-specificity of IgG antibody responses was determined by testing antibody responses to salivary gland extracts from Cx. pipiens, a mosquito that is present at these three sites at different density levels, and from two other Aedes species not present in the study area (Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus). The IgG responses observed against these mosquito salivary gland extracts contrasted with those observed against Ae. caspius salivary gland extracts, supporting the existence of species-specific serological responses. By considering different populations and densities of mosquitoes linked to environmental factors, this study shows, for the first time, that specific IgG antibody responses against Ae. caspius salivary gland extracts may be related to the seasonal and geographical variations in Ae. caspius density. Characterisation of such immunological-markers may allow the evaluation of the effectiveness of vector-control strategies or estimation of the risk of vector-borne disease transmission. © 2011 Fontaine et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Source


Fontaine A.,Antenne Marseille Of Linstitut Of Recherche Biomedicale Des Armees Irba | Diouf I.,Antenne Marseille Of Linstitut Of Recherche Biomedicale Des Armees Irba | Bakkali N.,Antenne Marseille Of Linstitut Of Recherche Biomedicale Des Armees Irba | Misse D.,IRD Montpellier | And 5 more authors.
Parasites and Vectors | Year: 2011

The saliva of haematophagous arthropods contains an array of anti-haemostatic, anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory molecules that contribute to the success of the blood meal. The saliva of haematophagous arthropods is also involved in the transmission and the establishment of pathogens in the host and in allergic responses. This survey provides a comprehensive overview of the pharmacological activity and immunogenic properties of the main salivary proteins characterised in various haematophagous arthropod species. The potential biological and epidemiological applications of these immunogenic salivary molecules will be discussed with an emphasis on their use as biomarkers of exposure to haematophagous arthropod bites or vaccine candidates that are liable to improve host protection against vector-borne diseases. © 2011 Fontaine et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. Source


Fontaine A.,Antenne Marseille Of Linstitut Of Recherche Biomedicale Des Armees Irba | Pophillat M.,Institut Universitaire de France | Bourdon S.,Antenne Marseille Of Linstitut Of Recherche Biomedicale Des Armees Irba | Villard C.,Jean Moulin University Lyon 3 | And 6 more authors.
Malaria Journal | Year: 2010

Background. Plasmodium falciparum infections could lead to severe malaria, principally in non-immune individuals as children and travellers from countries exempted of malaria. Severe malaria is often associated with the sequestration of P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes in deep micro-vascular beds via interactions between host endothelial receptors and parasite ligands expressed on the surface of the infected erythrocyte. Although, serological responses from individuals living in endemic areas against proteins expressed at surface of the infected erythrocyte have been largely studied, seldom data are available about the specific targets of antibody response from travellers. Methods. In order to characterize antigens recognized by traveller sera, a comparison of IgG immune response against membrane protein extracts from uninfected and P. falciparum-infected red blood cells (iRBC), using immunoblots, was performed between non exposed individuals (n = 31) and briefly exposed individuals (BEI) (n = 38) to malaria transmission. Results. Immune profile analysis indicated that eight protein bands from iRBC were significantly detected more frequently in the BEI group. Some of these antigenic proteins were identified by an original immuno-proteomic approach. Conclusion. Collectively, these data may be useful to characterize the singular serological immune response against a primary malaria infection in individuals briefly exposed to transmission. © 2010 Fontaine et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. Source


Fontaine A.,Antenne Marseille Of Linstitut Of Recherche Biomedicale Des Armees Irba | Pascual A.,Antenne Marseille Of Linstitut Of Recherche Biomedicale Des Armees Irba | Diouf I.,Antenne Marseille Of Linstitut Of Recherche Biomedicale Des Armees Irba | Bakkali N.,Antenne Marseille Of Linstitut Of Recherche Biomedicale Des Armees Irba | And 4 more authors.
Parasites and Vectors | Year: 2011

Mosquito salivary proteins are involved in several biological processes that facilitate their blood feeding and have also been reported to elicit an IgG response in vertebrates. A growing number of studies have focused on this immunological response for its potential use as a biological marker of exposure to arthropod bites. As mosquito saliva collection is extremely laborious and inefficient, most research groups prefer to work on mosquito salivary glands (SGs). Thus, SG protein integrity is a critical factor in obtaining meaningful data from immunological and biochemical analysis. Current methodologies rely on an immediate freezing of SGs after their collection. However, the maintenance of samples in a frozen environment can be hard to achieve in field conditions. In this study, SG proteins from two mosquito species (Aedes aegypti and Anopheles gambiae s.s.) stored in different media for 5 days at either +4°C or room temperature (RT) were evaluated at the quantitative (i.e., ELISA) and qualitative (i.e., SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting) levels. Our results indicated that PBS medium supplemented with an anti-protease cocktail seems to be the best buffer to preserve SG antigens for 5 days at +4°C for ELISA analysis. Conversely, cell-lysis buffer (Urea-Thiourea-CHAPS-Tris) was best at preventing protein degradation both at +4°C and RT for further qualitative analysis. These convenient storage methods provide an alternative to freezing and are expected to be applicable to other biological samples collected in the field. © 2011 Fontaine et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. Source

Discover hidden collaborations