Fougères, France
Fougères, France

Time filter

Source Type

Gaugain M.,Anses National Agency for Food | Gautier S.,Anses National Agency for Food | Bourcier S.,CNRS Molecular Chemistry Laboratory | Jacques A.-M.,National Agency for Veterinary Drug | And 4 more authors.
Food Additives and Contaminants - Part A Chemistry, Analysis, Control, Exposure and Risk Assessment | Year: 2015

Chlortetracycline (CTC) is a broad-spectrum antibiotic used in veterinary medicine for pulmonary or digestive infections and having a regulatory maximum residue limit (MRL) necessitating an official analytical control method. The purpose of this study was to clarify the identification of different forms of CTC observed in standard solution, in spiked muscle samples and in naturally incurred muscle samples of pigs analysed by LC-MS/MS and to demonstrate the in vivo formation of 6-iso-chlortetracycline and 4-epi-6-iso-CTC as a metabolite of CTC and 4-epi-CTC in muscle. The six following forms were identified, all being isobaric with a protonated molecule at m/z 479 (precursor ion): the keto-enol forms of CTC and the keto-enol forms of 4-epi-chlortetracycline (4-epi-CTC), 6-iso-chlortetracycline (6-iso-CTC) and 4-epi-6-iso-chlortetracycline (4-epi-6-iso-CTC). The 6-iso-CTC and 4-epi-6-iso-CTC were observed only in incurred pig samples so were identified for the first time as metabolites of CTC and 4-epi-CTC. Identification of the different forms was obtained by comparing incurred muscle samples with standard solutions and with spiked samples. Then the differences between the features of the chromatograms obtained by LC-TQ-MS and the fragmentation study of the different forms of CTC obtained by LC-Q-TOF-MS helped us to support this identification. The extraction steps and the LC-MS/MS conditions developed to analyse muscle tissue samples are described. This clarification concerning the rigorous identification of chromatographic peaks allowed us to evaluate the relevance of our monitoring method with regard to the regulations in place in the European Union and could be of help to laboratories involved in official control of antibiotic residues in food of animal origin. Additional results are also presented highlighting the transformation of the CTC when prepared in a mixture with other antibiotics. © 2015 Taylor & Francis.


A rapid and reliable LC-MS/MS method for the simultaneous confirmation of twelve non steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in bovine milk was developed and fully validated in accordance with the European Commission Decision 2002/657/EC. The validation scheme was built in accordance with the MRLs or target analytical levels (EU-CRL recommended concentrations and detection capabilities) of the analytes, except for diclofenac for which the lower level of validation achieved was 0.5 g kg(-1) whereas its MRL is 0.1 g kg(-1). The NSAIDs investigated were as follows: phenylbutazone (PBZ), oxyphenylbutazone (OPB), naproxen (NP), mefenamic acid (MF), vedaprofen (VDP), flunixin (FLU), 5-hydroxyflunixin (FLU-OH), tolfenamic acid (TLF), meloxicam (MLX), diclofenac (DC), carprofen (CPF) and ketoprofen (KTP). Several extraction procedures had been investigated during the development phase. Finally, the best results were obtained with a procedure using only methanol as the extraction solvent, with an evaporation step included and no further purification. Chromatographic separation was achieved on a C18 analytical column and the run was split in 2 segments. Matrix effects were also investigated. Data acquisition implemented for the confirmatory purpose was performed by monitoring 2 MRM transitions per analyte under the negative electrospray mode. Mean relative recoveries ranged from 94.7% to 110.0%, with their coefficients of variation lying between 2.9% and 14.7%. Analytical limits expressed in terms of decision limits (CC) were evaluated between 0.69 g kg(-1) (FLU) and 27.54 g kg(-1) (VDP) for non-MRL compounds, and at 0.10 (DC), 15.37 (MLX), 45.08 (FLU-OH), and 62.96 g kg(-1) (TLF) for MRL compounds. The validation results proved that the method is suitable for the screening and confirmatory steps as implemented for the French monitoring plan for NSAID residue control in bovine milk.


PubMed | Anses National Agency for Food
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Food additives & contaminants. Part A, Chemistry, analysis, control, exposure & risk assessment | Year: 2015

Chlortetracycline (CTC) is a broad-spectrum antibiotic used in veterinary medicine for pulmonary or digestive infections and having a regulatory maximum residue limit (MRL) necessitating an official analytical control method. The purpose of this study was to clarify the identification of different forms of CTC observed in standard solution, in spiked muscle samples and in naturally incurred muscle samples of pigs analysed by LC-MS/MS and to demonstrate the in vivo formation of 6-iso-chlortetracycline and 4-epi-6-iso-CTC as a metabolite of CTC and 4-epi-CTC in muscle. The six following forms were identified, all being isobaric with a protonated molecule at m/z 479 (precursor ion): the keto-enol forms of CTC and the keto-enol forms of 4-epi-chlortetracycline (4-epi-CTC), 6-iso-chlortetracycline (6-iso-CTC) and 4-epi-6-iso-chlortetracycline (4-epi-6-iso-CTC). The 6-iso-CTC and 4-epi-6-iso-CTC were observed only in incurred pig samples so were identified for the first time as metabolites of CTC and 4-epi-CTC. Identification of the different forms was obtained by comparing incurred muscle samples with standard solutions and with spiked samples. Then the differences between the features of the chromatograms obtained by LC-TQ-MS and the fragmentation study of the different forms of CTC obtained by LC-Q-TOF-MS helped us to support this identification. The extraction steps and the LC-MS/MS conditions developed to analyse muscle tissue samples are described. This clarification concerning the rigorous identification of chromatographic peaks allowed us to evaluate the relevance of our monitoring method with regard to the regulations in place in the European Union and could be of help to laboratories involved in official control of antibiotic residues in food of animal origin. Additional results are also presented highlighting the transformation of the CTC when prepared in a mixture with other antibiotics.


PubMed | ANSES National Agency for Food
Type: | Journal: Food additives & contaminants. Part A, Chemistry, analysis, control, exposure & risk assessment | Year: 2016

An approach is described to validate a fast and simple targeted screening method for antibiotic analysis in meat and aquaculture products by LC-MS/MS. The strategy of validation was applied for a panel of 75 antibiotics belonging to different families, i.e., penicillins, cephalosporins, sulfonamides, macrolides, quinolones and phenicols. The samples were extracted once with acetonitrile, concentrated by evaporation and injected into the LC-MS/MS system. The approach chosen for the validation was based on the Community Reference Laboratory (CRL) guidelines for the validation of screening qualitative methods. The aim of the validation was to prove sufficient sensitivity of the method to detect all the targeted antibiotics at the level of interest, generally the maximum residue limit (MRL). A robustness study was also performed to test the influence of different factors. The validation showed that the method is valid to detect and identify 73 antibiotics of the 75 antibiotics studied in meat and aquaculture products at the validation levels.


Dubreil E.,ANSES National Agency for Food | Gautier S.,ANSES National Agency for Food | Fourmond M.,ANSES National Agency for Food | Bessiral M.,ANSES National Agency for Food | And 2 more authors.
Food Additives and Contaminants - Part A Chemistry, Analysis, Control, Exposure and Risk Assessment | Year: 2016

An approach is described to validate a fast and simple targeted screening method for antibiotic analysis in meat and aquaculture products by LC-MS/MS. The strategy of validation was applied for a panel of 75 antibiotics belonging to different families, i.e., penicillins, cephalosporins, sulfonamides, macrolides, quinolones and phenicols. The samples were extracted once with acetonitrile, concentrated by evaporation and injected into the LC-MS/MS system. The approach chosen for the validation was based on the Community Reference Laboratory (CRL) guidelines for the validation of screening qualitative methods. The aim of the validation was to prove sufficient sensitivity of the method to detect all the targeted antibiotics at the level of interest, generally the maximum residue limit (MRL). A robustness study was also performed to test the influence of different factors. The validation showed that the method is valid to detect and identify 73 antibiotics of the 75 antibiotics studied in meat and aquaculture products at the validation levels. © 2016 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group

Loading ANSES National Agency for Food collaborators
Loading ANSES National Agency for Food collaborators