Ankara Childrens Hematology and Oncology Education and Research Hospital

Ankara, Turkey

Ankara Childrens Hematology and Oncology Education and Research Hospital

Ankara, Turkey
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Ozyoruk D.,Ankara Childrens Hematology and Oncology Education and Research Hospital | Kibar A.E.,Ankara Childrens Hematology and Oncology Education and Research Hospital | Surucu M.,Ankara Childrens Hematology and Oncology Education and Research Hospital | Azak E.,Ankara Childrens Hematology and Oncology Education and Research Hospital | And 4 more authors.
Pediatric Transplantation | Year: 2015

PH is a rare condition with high mortality rate after pediatric HSCT. As clinical presentation is non-specific and may mimic other conditions, a high degree of suspicion is required for diagnosis. Here, we present a patient with stage-IV neuroblastoma who developed PAH after autologous HSCT. After exclusion of other causes of PH, we regarded that this condition was secondary to HSCT. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd


PubMed | Ankara Childrens Hematology and Oncology Education and Research Hospital
Type: Case Reports | Journal: Pediatric transplantation | Year: 2015

PH is a rare condition with high mortality rate after pediatric HSCT. As clinical presentation is non-specific and may mimic other conditions, a high degree of suspicion is required for diagnosis. Here, we present a patient with stage-IV neuroblastoma who developed PAH after autologous HSCT. After exclusion of other causes of PH, we regarded that this condition was secondary to HSCT.


PubMed | Ankara Childrens Hematology and Oncology Education and Research Hospital
Type: | Journal: World journal of pediatrics : WJP | Year: 2016

Recently, awareness of the cumulative radiation exposure for pediatric oncology patients has been increasing, together with increased survival rates and longer life expectancy. The aim of our study was to quantify the amount of ionising radiation from imaging modalities of pediatric oncology patients.Eighty-eight patients who were diagnosed with childhood cancer and followed up for 5 years between 2004-2014 in our center were included in the study. Patients medical files were reviewed retrospectively for imaging history in the first 5 years after diagnosis. Total estimated effective doses from radiologic imaging modalities were determined. Also, the basic demographic data, histologic type, stage, and outcomes of disease were collected for all patients.The individual total estimated effective doses ranged from 8.73 to 167 mSv, with a median of 62.92 mSv. Computed tomography was the greatest contributor of total effective doses. The doses ranged 21.45-113.20 mSv (median: 62.92 mSv) in Hodgkin lymphoma, 12.53-167.10 mSv (median: 52 mSv) in non-Hodgkin lymphoma, 4.13-172.98 mSv (median: 52 mSv) in neuroblastoma, 31-149.89 mSv (median: 63.10 mSv) in Wilms tumor, 11.50-73.72 mSv (median: 36.90 mSv) in germ cell tumor, 26.46-125.86 mSv (median: 80.90 mSv) in other solid tumor and 0.02-13.31 mSv (5.25 mSv) in brain tumor subgroup. Twenty-two children (25%) died with progressive disease during the 5-year follow-up period.Similar to previous studies, the total estimated effective doses in children with cancer have been found various according to diagnosis, stage and clinical course. To clarify the harmfull effects of radiation burden, prospective studies should be conducted in children with cancer.

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