Ankara Child Disease Hematology and Oncology Training Hospital

Ankara, Turkey

Ankara Child Disease Hematology and Oncology Training Hospital

Ankara, Turkey
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Kutlu Yaman A.,Beypazari State Hospital | Demirel F.,Ankara Child Disease Hematology and Oncology Training Hospital | Ermis B.,Sakarya University | Etem Piskin I.,Bülent Ecevit University
JCRPE Journal of Clinical Research in Pediatric Endocrinology | Year: 2013

Objective: Iodine deficiency and excess are the most important factors that affect screening and recall rates of congenital hypothyroidism. The purpose of this study was to investigate the urinary iodine status in newborns and their mothers and its effects on neonatal thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels in a mildly iodine-deficient area. Methods: A total of 116 newborns and their mothers were included in the study. Urinary iodine levels were measured from healthy mothers and their babies on the 5th day following birth. Neonatal TSH levels were screened, and TSH and free thyroxine (fT4) levels were measured on the15th day in the recall cases. T4 treatment was started in infants with high TSH and low fT4 levels. These measurements were repeated on the 30th day in these newborns. Results: Ninety-nine percent of the mothers included in the study were using iodized salt. The median urinary iodine level in the newborns was 279 μg/L, while it was 84 μg/L in their mothers. The rate of iodine deficiency among the mothers was 56.8%, and the rate of iodine excess was 8.6%. This rate was 10.3% for iodine deficiency and 61.2% for iodine excess in the newborns. The recall rate at the screening was 9.5% (n=11). The urinary iodine levels were above 200 μg/L in three newborns who had transient hyperthyrotropinemia. Conclusions: Iodine deficiency was more frequently observed in nursing mothers, and iodine excess was more frequently seen in their newborns. The iodine excess noted in the newborns was attributed to the use of antiseptics containing iodine. The iodine excess leads to increases in recall rates, screening costs, and frequency of transient hyperthyrotropinemia. © Journal of Clinical Research in Pediatric Endocrinology, Published by Galenos Publishing.


Kara O.,Ankara Child Disease Hematology and Oncology Training Hospital | Demirel F.,Ankara Child Disease Hematology and Oncology Training Hospital | Acar B.C.,Ankara Child Disease Hematology and Oncology Training Hospital | Cakar N.,Ankara Child Disease Hematology and Oncology Training Hospital
Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabolism | Year: 2013

Wegener granulomatosis (WG) is a cytoplasmic antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (c-ANCA)-associated, multi-system, necrotizing granulomatous vasculitis. Inflammation of the nasal or oral mucosa, and lung and kidney involvements are typical in the course of the disease. In rare cases, pituitary involvement may occur and cause panhypopituitarism. Pituitary involvement is very rare, and only two pediatric case reports have been published to date out of a total of 24 cases. This is a case report of an adolescent patient who presented with panhypopituitarism symptoms and was later diagnosed with WG. A 16-year-old female patient complained of fever, headache, purulent nasal discharge and severe muscle and joint pain. Additionally, she had polyuria and polydipsia. Investigations revealed a pituitary mass and panhypopituitarism. Positivity of c-ANCA and renal biopsy result compatible with WG confirmed the diagnosis.

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