Beijing Animal Science Institute

Beijing, China

Beijing Animal Science Institute

Beijing, China
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Ma J.-X.,West Virginia University | Ma J.-X.,Johns Hopkins University | Yan B.-X.,West Virginia University | Zhang J.,IcesnowYanyan Bioscience Association | And 7 more authors.
Cell Death and Disease | Year: 2014

Ovarian cancer is a leading cause of cancer death as diagnosis is frequently delayed to an advanced stage. Effective biomarkers and screening strategies for early detection are urgently needed. In the current study, we identify PSP94 as a key upstream factor in mediating prostasin (a protein previously reported to be overexpressed in ovarian cancer) signaling that regulates prostasin expression and action in ovarian cancer cells. PSP94 is overexpressed in ovarian cancer cell lines and patients, and is significantly correlated with prostasin levels. Signaling pathway analysis demonstrated that both PSP94 and prostasin, as potential upstream regulators of the Lin28b/Let-7 pathway, regulate Lin28b and its downstream partner Let-7 in ovarian cancer cells. Expression of PSP94 and prostasin show a strong correlation with the expression levels of Lin28b/Let-7 in ovarian cancer patients. Thus, PSP94/prostasin axis appears to be linked to the Lin28b/Let-7 loop, a well-known signaling mechanism in oncogenesis in general that is also altered in ovarian cancer. The findings suggest that PSP94 and PSP94/prostasin axis are key factors and potential therapeutic targets or early biomarkers for ovarian cancer. © 2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.


Yan B.-X.,West Virginia University | Ma J.-X.,West Virginia University | Ma J.-X.,Johns Hopkins University | Zhang J.,IcesnowYanyan Bioscience Association | And 5 more authors.
Cell Death and Disease | Year: 2014

Ovarian cancer is the deadliest of gynecologic cancers, largely due to the development of drug resistance in chemotherapy. Prostasin may have an essential role in the oncogenesis. In this study, we show that prostasin is decreased in an ovarian cancer drug-resistant cell line and in ovarian cancer patients with high levels of excision repair cross-complementing 1, a marker for chemoresistance. Our cell cultural model investigation demonstrates prostasin has important roles in the development of drug resistance and cancer cell survival. Forced overexpression of prostasin in ovarian cancer cells greatly induces cell death (resulting in 99% cell death in a drug-resistant cell line and 100% cell death in other tested cell lines). In addition, the surviving cells grow at a much lower rate compared with non-overexpressed cells. In vivo studies indicate that forced overexpression of prostasin in drug-resistant cells greatly inhibits the growth of tumors and may partially reverse drug resistance. Our investigation of the molecular mechanisms suggests that prostasin may repress cancer cells and/or contribute to chemoresistance by modulating the CASP/P21-activated protein kinase (PAK2)-p34 pathway, and thereafter PAK2-p34/JNK/c-jun and PAK2-p34/mlck/actin signaling pathways. Thus, we introduce prostain as a potential target for treating/repressing some ovarian tumors and have begun to identify their relevant molecular targets in specific signaling pathways. © 2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited.


Yan B.-x.,West Virginia University | Ma J.-x.,Johns Hopkins University | Zhang J.,1 IcesnowYanyan Bioscience Association | Zhang J.,Beijing Animal Science Institute | And 5 more authors.
Oncogene | Year: 2013

Tumor drug resistance remains a major challenge in the treatment of cancer. Here, we show that Prostatic secretory protein 94 (PSP94) levels are reduced in ovarian cancer patients with high levels of excision repair cross-complementing 1 (ERCC1), a marker for chemoresistance. We find that PSP94 is decreased in an ovarian cancer drug-resistant cell line, and plays an important role in the development of drug resistance in vitro. Our studies indicate that PSP94 can partially reverse drug resistance in mouse tumor models in vivo and that a PSP94 peptide derivative PCK3145 suppresses chemoresistant cancer cell and tumor growth in vitro and in vivo. Our investigation of the involved molecular mechanisms suggests that PSP94 may confer drug resistance by modulating the Lin28b/Let-7 signaling pathway. We introduce PSP94 and its peptide derivative PCK3145 as potential target to reverse chemoresistance in ovarian cancer and have begun to identify their relevant molecular targets in specific signaling pathways.Oncogene advance online publication, 4 November 2013; doi:10.1038/onc.2013.466.

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