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News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: www.fao.org

With rapid economic growth and expanding urban populations in Viet Nam, demand for food has been increasing at a fast pace in recent years. Poultry is an important source of animal protein in the country. According to 2014 figures from the Hanoi Trade Department, approximately 4 650 000 kg of poultry meat is consumed monthly in Viet Nam’s capital Hanoi. Many individual households manage their own small and medium-sized parent flock farms or hatcheries to support this vast urban demand and gain extra income. In order to support these small and medium-sized poultry farmers, FAO Viet Nam' s Emergency Centre for Transboundary Animal Diseases (ECTAD) and the Department of Livestock Production (DLP) of the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural development (MARD) developed basic biosecurity standards for small and medium-scale parent flock farms and hatcheries. The initial assessment phase and pilot project was funded by the United States Agency of International Development (USAID). By implementing simple measures at twelve pilot farms in the Quang Tri and Can Tho provinces, farmers experienced a significant change in their businesses and working environments while protecting their flocks against diseases including Avian Influenza. FAO is now working with the World Poultry Foundation to build on lessons learned and reach a larger number of farmers across Viet Nam with the aim of finding a sustainable solution for hatchery improvement nationally. Promoting a healthier environment for both poultry and farmers FAO's poultry value chain assessment programme showed that small or medium-scale poultry parent flock farms and hatcheries in Viet Nam are lacking guidance and know-how on implementing and managing clean and safe farm operations. Poor biosecurity conditions contribute not only to low quality products, but also to the spread of pathogens, environmental pollution, and health threats for workers. In fact, poor biosecurity in poultry farms has been recognized as one of the factors that contributed to the emergence and spread of H5N1 HPAI (Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza) since 2003, threatening food safety along poultry value chains in Viet Nam. While larger farms in Viet Nam were provided with Viet GAHP (Vietnamese Good Animal Husbandry Practices) biosecurity guidelines by MARD, these guidelines are not suitable for small and medium-scale poultry breeder farms and hatcheries. Introducing simple, practical, and feasible biosecurity measures for safer and cleaner hatcheries As part of the pilot project, 15 simple biosecurity measures were implemented in 12 duck farms and hatcheries in the Quang Tri and Can Tho Provinces. These measures included introducing new feeders and low-cost nests, separating flocks from the farmer's living area, implementing improved hygiene practices such as egg fumigation, and applying more effective management methods. Just three months later, farmers witnessed significant changes in their lives.  Egg productivity rates and quality increased. Mr. Son, who participated in the project, noted that after implementing the new biosecurity measures, he was able to increase hatching of his 850 laying ducks to result in 2 245 extra ducklings that hatched over two and a half months and generated 530 US$ of extra income. Furthermore, general flock health was improved with fewer cases of diarrhea and lower culling rates of laying duck.  Farmers also noted more pleasant working conditions with cleaner and better-smelling farms. During the three-month implementation of the project, hatchery owners gained between US$271 and US$ 4 327 in additional income from increased hatchability rates. The increased survival rates during the duckling’s first week of life also improved the hatchery’s reputation among buyers and thus increased business. All of these changes resulted in reduced working hours and a better quality of life for local farmers. Training is fundamental to establishing good biosecurity at the beginning of the poultry value chain Based on the successful result of the pilot project, the “Guidelines on biosecurity minimum measures for small and medium scale hatcheries” and the “Guidelines on biosecurity minimum measures for small and medium-scale poultry breeder farms” were both officially issued by MARD. Establishing good biosecurity practices at the beginning of the poultry value chain has made a difference in twelve pilot farms in Viet Nam. FAO and its partners are aware that training is central to ensuring continued success. Training and advocacy films will be used to raise awareness and inform more farmers about simple farm management practices that can improve their livelihoods by increasing productivity, decreasing disease and improving food safety. Additionally, FAO, in collaboration with the World Poultry Foundation, has developed a training manual which will be rolled out  to a broader group of small hatchery owners across Viet Nam.


News Article | May 4, 2017
Site: www.fao.org

India has come a long way since 1945 when it became one of the founding members of FAO as a low-income food-deficient country. Today, the country is not only self-sufficient in rice and wheat, it also produces over 260 million tonnes of food grains, 269 million tonnes of agriculture produce and 132 million tonnes of milk. Agriculture is a mainstay of the country’s economy, contributing to 18 percent of India’s GDP and providing a source of employment for more than 47 percent of the population.* FAO has been a staunch partner in this journey of success since 1948, when our operations in India first began. In recent years, our efforts in the country have gone beyond the realm of food production, concentrating on providing technical assistance for incorporating best practices to generate agricultural outlooks, facilitating adoption and promotion of improved livestock management practices, and building knowledge and capacities of communities to adapt to climate change. At the same time, India is also an important knowledge partner for FAO, providing technical expertise to other countries, and the lessons learned from programmes implemented over the years are now being applied in other parts of the world. In order to achieve the most impact with respect to India’s vast and highly heterogeneous food and agriculture system, FAO  is working to facilitate the country’s multilateral cooperation in areas such as trans-boundary pests and diseases, livestock production, fisheries management, food safety and climate change. Working with the Government, FAO provides technical assistance and capacity building to enable the transfer of best practices as well as taking lessons learned from different countries and applying them to India’s agriculture system. Demonstrating integrated models for small holder poultry and small ruminant (goats and sheep) development in arid and semi-arid regions The South Asia Pro-Poor Livestock Policy Programme (SAPPLPP) aims to strengthen capacities and knowledge of both government and non-government actors for implementing sustainable small ruminant and smallholder poultry rearing interventions, based on lessons learnt from pilot interventions. Apart from policy advocacy work, including knowledge management and networking, the programme is supporting three pilot projects in the states of MadhyaPradesh and Rajasthan. The programme is supported under an FAO TCP grant (USD 385,000 over two years), with co-funding (approximately USD 300,000) from the National Dairy Development Board (NDDB), Government of India (GoI). The pilot projects are being implemented in partnership with local NGOs. The programme has successfully demonstrated the contribution of small ruminants and back yard poultry to the household economy, and highlighted the importance of these sub-sectors as major contributors to pathways out of poverty. A fully active cadre of women community animal health workers (CAHWs), known as Pashu Sakhis, is providing regular preventive veterinary care services at the two pilot locations in the Khargone and Jhabua districts of Madhya Pradesh. Each pilot project covers a cluster of 10 villages. The CAHWs work to promote improved livestock management practices and preventive veterinary care against major small ruminant and poultry diseases (Peste des Petits Ruminants, Enterotoxemia, etc.(in goats), and New Castle Disease (in poultry)). Pashu Sakhis maintain vaccination records and monitor and report disease outbreaks. They are linked to government veterinary hospitals and dispensaries in the area. Community response to the Pashu Sakhi model of service has been extremely positive, helped by demonstrated reductions in animal mortality (from 37 to 7% in the goat pilot, and from 76% to 48% in the poultry pilot, over a period of eight months), improved returns (income increase between USD 100 and 200 in the first year), as well as savings on veterinary care costs. An initiative for furtherance of policy dialogue on the small ruminants’ agenda in the western state of Rajasthan has been the establishment of a state forum of goat and sheep development. The programme is also facilitating multi-stakeholder dialogue and discussion, along with the Department of Animal Husbandry, Dairying and Fisheries, MoA, for standardisation of training curriculum and modules for CAHWs in the areas of small ruminant animal husbandry practices and veterinary care. Building community capacity for coping with impacts of climate change FAO has been working to increase community capacities to adapt farming patterns and apply strategies that minimize the effects of climatic variations in India. To this end, seven drought-prone districts in Andhra Pradesh and Telangana were involved in a successful pilot project, whose model is now ready to be applied to other agro–climatic zones. Referred to as SPACC (Strategic Pilot on Adaptation to Climate Change), the intervention covered nine hydrological units and was implemented via a network of nine non-governmental organizations (NGOs), led by the Bharathi Integrated Rural Development Society (BIRDS). Participatory climate monitoring (PCM) stations were established in 25 villages across the project area. Seven climate parameters, including wind direction and velocity, rainfall and sunshine hours,  were regularly recorded and registered by a group of nearly 300 volunteers. Results recorded in the volunteers’ record books were then disseminated at the habitation level, using display boards. Climate Change Adaptation Committees (CCACs) were formed as a coordination and consultative mechanism, managing the climate monitoring system at the habitation and hydrological unit levels and ensuring dissemination of the information and knowledge gained. Men and women farmers equally participated in Farmer Climate Schools, established in partnership with the CCACs. Participants collected data on climate-related factors and analyzed their impact on agricultural livelihoods, subsequently making more informed decisions on adaptive measures and developing action plans accordingly. During the pilot period, 1 156 farmers (650 female, 506 male) graduated from two school cycles. Cutting-edge outlooks improve reporting on food and nutrition security India has been able to generate outlooks for its agriculture sector for the first time as a result of the project “Incorporating International Best Practices in the Preparation of Agricultural Outlooks and Situation Analyses for India”.  In less than a year, eight quarterly and three biannual reports have been produced, and 26 briefings have been delivered to senior policymakers. The project is also a successful example of the use of digital technologies to improve the reliability and timeliness of collection, collation and transmission of data on crop conditions, production and markets. What this information does is to aid predictions and planning at global and national level, thereby strengthening efforts to address food and nutrition security worldwide. The latest OECD-FAO Agricultural Outlook, launched in July 2014 with a special focus on India, projects sustained food production and consumption growth in the country, led by value-added sectors like dairy production and aquaculture. Late 2014, Director General José Graziano da Silva and Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi, agreed on how to further strengthen efforts to promote India’s food security and sustainable agricultural development during talks held in New Delhi.


EM is an abbreviation of “Effective Microorganism”, is a new compound microbial preparation, composed of photosynthetic bacteria, lactic acid bacteria, yeast, actinomycetes and other 10 more than 80 kinds of microbial compound culture from the flora, formed a complex and stable microbial system, mutual cooperation, the advantages of powerful, extremely powerful. For more information or any query mail at sales@wiseguyreports.com This report focuses on the Effective Microorganisms (EM) in Global market, especially in North America, Europe and Asia-Pacific, South America, Middle East and Africa. This report categorizes the market based on manufacturers, regions, type and application. Market Segment by Regions, regional analysis covers North America (USA, Canada and Mexico) Europe (Germany, France, UK, Russia and Italy) Asia-Pacific (China, Japan, Korea, India and Southeast Asia) South America (Brazil, Argentina, Columbia etc.) Middle East and Africa (Saudi Arabia, UAE, Egypt, Nigeria and South Africa) Market Segment by Applications, can be divided into Agriculture Animal Husbandry Wastewater Treatment Sanitation Systems Other There are 15 Chapters to deeply display the global Effective Microorganisms (EM) market. Chapter 2, to analyze the top manufacturers of Effective Microorganisms (EM), with sales, revenue, and price of Effective Microorganisms (EM), in 2016 and 2017; Chapter 3, to display the competitive situation among the top manufacturers, with sales, revenue and market share in 2016 and 2017; 1 Market Overview 1.1 Effective Microorganisms (EM) Introduction 1.2 Market Analysis by Type 1.2.1 EM 1 1.2.2 EM 1.3 Market Analysis by Applications 1.3.1 Agriculture 1.3.2 Animal Husbandry 1.3.3 Wastewater Treatment 1.3.4 Sanitation Systems 1.3.5 Other 1.4 Market Analysis by Regions 1.4.1 North America (USA, Canada and Mexico) 1.4.1.1 USA Market States and Outlook (2012-2022) 1.4.1.2 Canada Market States and Outlook (2012-2022) 1.4.1.3 Mexico Market States and Outlook (2012-2022) 1.4.2 Europe (Germany, France, UK, Russia and Italy) 1.4.2.1 Germany Market States and Outlook (2012-2022) 1.4.2.2 France Market States and Outlook (2012-2022) 1.4.2.3 UK Market States and Outlook (2012-2022) 1.4.2.4 Russia Market States and Outlook (2012-2022) 1.4.2.5 Italy Market States and Outlook (2012-2022) 1.4.3 Asia-Pacific (China, Japan, Korea, India and Southeast Asia) 1.4.3.1 China Market States and Outlook (2012-2022) 1.4.3.2 Japan Market States and Outlook (2012-2022) 1.4.3.3 Korea Market States and Outlook (2012-2022) 1.4.3.4 India Market States and Outlook (2012-2022) 1.4.3.5 Southeast Asia Market States and Outlook (2012-2022) 1.4.4 South America, Middle East and Africa 1.4.4.1 Brazil Market States and Outlook (2012-2022) 1.4.4.2 Egypt Market States and Outlook (2012-2022) 1.4.4.3 Saudi Arabia Market States and Outlook (2012-2022) 1.4.4.4 South Africa Market States and Outlook (2012-2022) 1.4.4.5 Nigeria Market States and Outlook (2012-2022) 1.5 Market Dynamics 1.5.1 Market Opportunities 1.5.2 Market Risk 1.5.3 Market Driving Force 2 Manufacturers Profiles 2.1 EMRO 2.1.1 Business Overview 2.1.2 Effective Microorganisms (EM) Type and Applications 2.1.2.1 Type 1 2.1.2.2 Type 2 2.1.3 EMRO Effective Microorganisms (EM) Sales, Price, Revenue, Gross Margin and Market Share (2016-2017) 2.2 EMNZ 2.2.1 Business Overview 2.2.2 Effective Microorganisms (EM) Type and Applications 2.2.2.1 Type 1 2.2.2.2 Type 2 2.2.3 EMNZ Effective Microorganisms (EM) Sales, Price, Revenue, Gross Margin and Market Share (2016-2017) 2.3 SCD Probiotics 2.3.1 Business Overview 2.3.2 Effective Microorganisms (EM) Type and Applications 2.3.2.1 Type 1 2.3.2.2 Type 2 2.3.3 SCD Probiotics Effective Microorganisms (EM) Sales, Price, Revenue, Gross Margin and Market Share (2016-2017) 2.4 Efficient Microbes 2.4.1 Business Overview 2.4.2 Effective Microorganisms (EM) Type and Applications 2.4.2.1 Type 1 2.4.2.2 Type 2 2.4.3 Efficient Microbes Effective Microorganisms (EM) Sales, Price, Revenue, Gross Margin and Market Share (2016-2017) 2.5 Asia Plant 2.5.1 Business Overview 2.5.2 Effective Microorganisms (EM) Type and Applications 2.5.2.1 Type 1 2.5.2.2 Type 2 2.5.3 Asia Plant Effective Microorganisms (EM) Sales, Price, Revenue, Gross Margin and Market Share (2016-2017) 2.6 VIOOO Biology 2.6.1 Business Overview 2.6.2 Effective Microorganisms (EM) Type and Applications 2.6.2.1 Type 1 2.6.2.2 Type 2 2.6.3 VIOOO Biology Effective Microorganisms (EM) Sales, Price, Revenue, Gross Margin and Market Share (2016-2017) 3 Global Effective Microorganisms (EM) Market Competition, by Manufacturer 3.1 Global Effective Microorganisms (EM) Sales and Market Share by Manufacturer 3.2 Global Effective Microorganisms (EM) Revenue and Market Share by Manufacturer 3.3 Market Concentration Rate 3.3.1 Top 3 Effective Microorganisms (EM) Manufacturer Market Share 3.3.2 Top 6 Effective Microorganisms (EM) Manufacturer Market Share 3.4 Market Competition Trend For more information or any query mail at sales@wiseguyreports.com ABOUT US: Wise Guy Reports is part of the Wise Guy Consultants Pvt. Ltd. and offers premium progressive statistical surveying, market research reports, analysis & forecast data for industries and governments around the globe. Wise Guy Reports features an exhaustive list of market research reports from hundreds of publishers worldwide. We boast a database spanning virtually every market category and an even more comprehensive collection of rmaket research reports under these categories and sub-categories. For more information, please visit https://www.wiseguyreports.com


News Article | March 11, 2017
Site: www.techtimes.com

The Audubon Aquarium in New Orleans recently welcomed a new guest, a minor sea otter from Monterey, California, which was rescued. According to a statement from the Audubon Nature Institute, the female sea otter is 18 months old and arrived at the institution on Wednesday, March 8, in the evening. She has got a new companion, an 8-year old sea otter named Clara who is a present resident of Audubon's 25,000 gallon sea otter habitation. "We are thrilled to be able to provide a new companion for Clara. Having the ability to care for this rescued otter, and support southern sea otter conservation with our partners," said Beth Firchau, Director of Animal Husbandry, Audubon Aquarium of the Americas. The Monterey Bay Aquarium's Sea Otter Research and Conservation (SORAC) program found the abandoned baby sea otter when she was only a day old in September 2015. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Officials decided that the baby otter would not survive without having a home after their multiple failed attempts to send her back into the ocean, where she belongs. The baby otter traveled for almost a whole day just to arrive at her new home in New Orleans. The sea otter has a favorite toy, a red ball which she brought along to entertain herself during the long journey. No the baby otter does not have a name yet but will soon. Audubon Aquarium is arranging an online poll to offer visitors an opportunity to name the baby otter, which can be found on its official website. There are three name options that people can choose from - Ruby, Charley and Pearl. All the three names are related to renowned author and Monterey County resident John Steinbeck. The chosen name will be declared on the aquarium's official Facebook page and website on March 16. SORAC program is continuously researching and trying to rescue vulnerable otters of southern sea since 1984. It saves, treats, raises, releases or takes care of otters and also arranges scientific research. Although the prime focus of this program is southern sea otters but SORAC authority planned to study sea otters of Russia, Alaska and also southern California in association with the U.S. Geological Survey and several other scientists. Audubon is famous for its hard work and incredible care given by human to the sea otters, said Firchau. She also added that their collaboration with SORAS is very important for them to do their work properly. To get the chance of naming the otter, visit Audubon's Facebook page or Official website. To see the adorable otter playing with her ball, check out the video below. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


Wiseguyreports.Com Adds “Agriculture Custom Software Services -Market Demand, Growth, Opportunities and Analysis of Top Key Player Forecast To 2022” To Its Research Database In this report, the USA Agriculture Software Services market is valued at USD XX million in 2016 and is expected to reach USD XX million by the end of 2022, growing at a CAGR of XX% between 2016 and 2022. The research report on the US Agriculture Custom Software Services market studies the market in the past based on which estimates are presented for the future. The report looks into vital market indicators, trends, and opportunities that will have a bearing on the development of this market. The report begins with an outline of terms and terminologies, classifications, and applications that are standard conventions in the US Agriculture Custom Software Services market. A glance into the industry chain structure and industry statutes that govern this industry are presented herein. Following this, operational parameters of the Agriculture Custom Software Services market such as manufacturing processes, product catalog, and cost structures are discussed at length in this report. This, in turn, helps to understand production capacity, product pricing and profit, and demand and supply gap for new entities interested in participating in the US Agriculture Custom Software Services market. This analysis is also indicative how operational aspects of the US Agriculture Custom Software Services market will impact the development of the market until the end of the forecast period. The report discusses the competitive landscape of the US Agriculture Custom Software Services market at length. The major companies that have a significant presence in this market are profiled for business attributes such as financial standing, production capacity, and SWOTs. Each of these companies is studied with reference to a timescale, in order to comprehend the changing competitive hierarchy of the US Agriculture Custom Software Services market over the past few years. The report is compiled in a chapter-wise format for reading comprehensibility, with each chapter discussing the progression analysis of a specific aspect of the market at length. Custom Software Services Consumption ( Market) in US Agriculture 1 Industry Overview 1.1 Agriculture Software Services Market Overview 1.1.1 Agriculture Software Services Product Scope 1.1.2 Market Status and Outlook 1.2 USA Agriculture Software Services Market by Product 1.3.1USA Agriculture Software Services Revenue (Million USD) and Growth (%) Comparison by Product (2012-2022) 1.3.2 USA Agriculture Software Services Revenue (Million USD) Market Share (%) by Product in 2016 1.2.1 Production Software 1.2.2 Financial Analysis Software 1.2.3 Accounting Software 1.2.4 Advanced Management Tools 1.2.5 Others 1.3USA Agriculture Software Services Market by End Users/Application 1.3.1 Animal Husbandry Software 1.3.2 Aquaculture Software 1.3.3 Hatchery Software 1.3.4 Nursery Software 1.3.5 Crop Production Software 1.3.6 Livestock Production Software 1.3.7 Others 1.4 Agriculture Software Services Development History and Outlook 1.4.1 Agriculture Software Services Development History and Status 1.4.2 Agriculture Software Services Development Outlook 1.5 Value and deal sizes 2 USA Agriculture Software Services Competition Analysis by Players 2.1 USA Agriculture Software Services Market Size (Value) by Players (2012-2017) 2.2 Competitive Status and Trend 2.2.1 Market Concentration Rate 2.2.2 Product/Service Differences 2.2.3 New Entrants 2.2.4 The Technology Trends in Future 3 Company (Top Players) Profiles and Key Data 3.1 I2S SA 3.1.1 Company Profile 3.1.2 Main Business/Business Overview 3.1.3 Products, Services and Solutions 3.1.4 I2S SA Agriculture Software Services Revenue (Value) (2012-2017) 3.1.5 Recent Developments 3.2 AKVA group 3.2.1 Company Profile 3.2.2 Main Business/Business Overview 3.2.3 Products, Services and Solutions 3.2.4 AKVA group Agriculture Software Services Revenue (Value) (2012-2017) 3.2.5 Recent Developments 3.3 ERP FM 3.3.1 Company Profile 3.3.2 Main Business/Business Overview 3.3.3 Products, Services and Solutions 3.3.4 ERP FM Agriculture Software Services Revenue (Value) (2012-2017) 3.3.5 Recent Developments 3.4 Agrimaster 3.4.1 Company Profile 3.4.2 Main Business/Business Overview 3.4.3 Products, Services and Solutions 3.4.4 Agrimaster Agriculture Software Services Revenue (Value) (2012-2017) 3.4.5 Recent Developments 3.5 FBS Systems 3.5.1 Company Profile 3.5.2 Main Business/Business Overview 3.5.3 Products, Services and Solutions 3.5.4 FBS Systems Agriculture Software Services Revenue (Value) (2012-2017) 3.5.5 Recent Developments 3.6 SST Development Group 3.6.1 Company Profile 3.6.2 Main Business/Business Overview 3.6.3 Products, Services and Solutions 3.6.4 SST Development Group Agriculture Software Services Revenue (Value) (2012-2017) 3.6.5 Recent Developments 3.7 SMAG 3.7.1 Company Profile 3.7.2 Main Business/Business Overview 3.7.3 Products, Services and Solutions 3.7.4 SMAG Agriculture Software Services Revenue (Value) (2012-2017) 3.7.5 Recent Developments 3.8 Ayoka 3.8.1 Company Profile 3.8.2 Main Business/Business Overview 3.8.3 Products, Services and Solutions 3.8.4 Ayoka Agriculture Software Services Revenue (Value) (2012-2017) 3.8.5 Recent Developments 3.9 Granular, Inc 3.9.1 Company Profile 3.9.2 Main Business/Business Overview 3.9.3 Products, Services and Solutions 3.9.4 Granular, Inc Agriculture Software Services Revenue (Value) (2012-2017) 3.9.5 Recent Developments 3.10 Agrivi 3.10.1 Company Profile 3.10.2 Main Business/Business Overview 3.10.3 Products, Services and Solutions 3.10.4 Agrivi Agriculture Software Services Revenue (Value) (2012-2017) 3.10.5 Recent Developments 3.11 Ayoka,LLC 3.12 Sum-It 3.13 AG Leader Technology 3.14 Agjunction 3.15 EFC Systems 3.16 Deere & Company For more information, please visit https://www.wiseguyreports.com/sample-request/1203917-custom-software-services-consumption-market-in-us-agriculture


Li Z.,Northwest University, China | Wang H.,Northwest University, China | Chen L.,Northwest University, China | Wang L.,Northwest University, China | And 3 more authors.
Animal Genetics | Year: 2014

MicroRNA (miRNA) mediates post-transcriptional gene regulation and plays an important role in regulating the development of immune cells and in modulating innate and adaptive immune responses in mammals, including cattle. In the present study, we identified novel and differentially expressed miRNAs in peripheral blood from healthy and mastitis Holstein cattle by Solexa sequencing and bioinformatics. In total, 608 precursor hairpins (pre-miRNAs) encoding for 753 mature miRNAs were detected. Statistically, 173 unique miRNAs (of 753, 22.98%) were identified that had significant differential expression between healthy and mastitis Holstein cattle (P < 0.001). Most differentially expressed miRNAs (118 of 173, 68.21%) belonged to the chemokine signaling pathway involved in the immune responses. This study expands the number of miRNAs known to be expressed in cattle. The patterns of miRNAs expression differed significantly between the peripheral blood from healthy and mastitis Holstein cattle, which provide important information on mastitis in miRNAs expression. Diverse miRNAs may play an important role in the treatment of mastitis in Holstein cattle. © 2013 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.


Li Z.,Northwest University, China | Zhai M.,Northwest University, China | Wang H.,Northwest University, China | Chen L.,Northwest University, China | And 4 more authors.
Gene | Year: 2014

Protein arginine N-methyltransferase 2 (PRMT2), also named HRMT1L1, belongs to the Bovine Protein arginine N-methyltransferase (PRMT) genes which are involved in the immune response. To explore the variability of the PRMT2 gene and resistance to mastitis in cows, splice variant (SV), and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified in this study. A SV (PRMT2-SV) lacking exon 7 (98-bp) of the PRMT2 gene was found in healthy and mastitis-infected mammary gland tissues. Two of four SNPs were significantly associated with bovine milk yield and protein content. Further, we estimated the relative expression of PRMT2-SV in the mammary gland tissue of dairy cattle by using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The result showed that expression of the PRMT2-SV mRNA was significantly upregulated 4.02-fold (p<. 0.05) in infected mammary tissues (n. = 5) compared to healthy tissues (n. = 5). Our findings reveal that PRMT2-SV may play an important role in mastitis resistance in dairy cattle. The SNPs may be used as a possible candidate SNPs for marker-assisted selection and management in Chinese Holstein cattle. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.

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