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Bailey S.S.,University of Bristol | Crawshaw T.R.,Animal Health and Veterinary Laboratories Agency Starcross | Smith N.H.,Animal Health and Veterinary Laboratories Agency Weybridge | Palgrave C.J.,University of Bristol
Veterinary Journal | Year: 2013

Mycobacterium bovis, the causative agent of bovine tuberculosis (TB), infects a wide range of wild and domestic mammals. Despite a control programme spanning decades, M. bovis infection levels in cattle in Great Britain (GB) have continued to rise over recent years. As the incidence of infection in cattle and wildlife may be linked to that in swine, data relating to infection of pigs identified at slaughter were examined in this study. Between 2007 and 2011, almost all M. bovis-infected pigs originated from farms in the South-West and West-Midland regions of England. The data suggest that pigs raised outdoors or on holdings with poor biosecurity may be more vulnerable to infection with M. bovis. In the majority of cases, the same strains of M. bovis were found in pigs and cattle, despite that fact that direct contact between these species was rarely observed. Genotyping and geographical mapping data indicated that some strains found in pigs may correlate better with those present in badgers, rather than cattle. In consequence, it is proposed that pigs may represent a useful sentinel for M. bovis infection in wildlife in GB. Given the potential implications of this infection for the pig industry, and for the on-going effort to control bovine TB, the importance of understanding the epidemiology and pathogenesis of M. bovis infection, as well as monitoring its prevalence, in pigs should not be underestimated. © 2013.


Collins R.,Animal Health and Veterinary Laboratories Agency Starcross | Cranwell M.,Animal Health and Veterinary Laboratories Agency Starcross | Mitchell S.,Animal Health and Veterinary Laboratories Agency Carmarthen | Wessels M.,Animal Health and Veterinary Laboratories Agency | And 2 more authors.
Cattle Practice | Year: 2013

Nematodes of the genus Trichuris, commonly referred to as "whipworms", are substantial parasites of the large intestine in a wide range of species. Infections in cattle are not normally associated with clinical disease being light and asymptomatic in nature. This report describes three cases of Trichuris discolor infection contributing to ill-thrift and diarrhoea in housed bullocks.


McGoldrick A.,Animal Health and Veterinary Laboratories Agency Starcross | Chanter J.,Animal Health and Veterinary Laboratories Agency Starcross | Gale S.,Animal Health and Veterinary Laboratories Agency Winchester | Parr J.,Animal Health and Veterinary Laboratories Agency Winchester | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Microbiological Methods | Year: 2013

Bovine venereal campylobacter infection, caused by Campylobacter fetus venerealis, is of significant economic importance to the livestock industry. Unfortunately, the successful detection and discrimination of C. fetus venerealis from C. fetus fetus continue to be a limitation throughout the world. There are several publications warning of the problem with biotyping methods as well as with recent molecular based assays. In this study, assessed on 1071 isolates, we report on the successful development of two Real Time SYBR® Green PCR assays that will allow for the detection and discrimination of C. fetus fetus and C. fetus venerealis. The sensitivity reported here for the C. fetus (CampF4/R4) and the C. fetus venerealis (CampF7/R7) specific PCR assays are 100% and 98.7% respectively. The specificity for these same PCR assays are 99.6% and 99.8% respectively. © 2013 The Authors.

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