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News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Tyson Ferraro has accepted the role of Director of Marketing at CSI. In this (re)new(ed) role, Tyson will shape and implement the marketing strategy across all business units at Control Solutions, Inc. Tyson will report directly to Mark Boyd, CEO with day-to-day alignment to Curtis Clark, Executive Vice President. Tyson brings over six years of marketing, sales, and product portfolio management experience. Prior to joining CSI, he worked at Dow AgroSciences where he held leadership roles in both, the Pest Management, and Crop Protection divisions. Before joining Dow, Ty received a Bachelor of Science Degree in Business Marketing and a Master of Business Administration Degree with a concentration on Marketing and Management, both from Indiana University’s Kelley School of Business. His business acumen and professional experience market leading companies serving diverse markets will provide a strong foundation for success as CSI continues to bring innovative and customer-focused solutions to customers across our multiple business lines. Control Solutions began as a family owned business in 1958 and is built on to the commitment of serving the professional pest control and retail markets. CSI has added product lines for the Industrial, Lawn and Garden, Turf, Animal Health and Biocide markets, and is working with over 80 distributors serving those markets. Control Solutions maintains relationships with chemical manufacturers worldwide and provides a ready supply of products in distribution warehouses across the U.S. The partnership with ADAMA multiplies Control Solutions’ agility in continuously adding new products to meet the needs of professionals and homeowners. "The one constant since the beginning in 1958 is our mission focus: to seek out and distribute effective and economical solutions for our customers," stated Mark Boyd, President and founder of CSI. ADAMA Agricultural Solutions Ltd. is a leading global manufacturer and distributor worldwide of crop protection solutions. The Company supplies efficient solutions to farmers across the full farming value-chain, including crop-protection, novel agricultural technologies, and complementary non-crop businesses. In 2013, the Company’s revenues were over $3 billion, and it is ranked seventh in the world in the overall agrochemicals industry. The Company is characterized by its heritage of innovation, farmer-centric approach to product development, and it’s observance of strict standards of environmental protection and quality control. For more information, visit us at http://www.adama.com.


News Article | February 23, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

ANN ARBOR, Mich., Feb. 23, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Zomedica Pharmaceuticals Corp. (TSX-V:ZOM), a veterinary pharmaceutical and health care solutions company, today announced that Robert W. DiMarzo has joined the company as Executive Vice President of Global Strategy. In this new company position, DiMarzo is responsible for expanding Zomedica’s business outside North America via business development opportunities and globalization strategies for existing pipeline products. “A proven entrepreneur in the animal health space, Robert’s extensive experience in the United States, Europe, Asia, and Latin America, for industry leaders such as Pfizer Animal Health, complements the qualifications of our talented executive team,” stated Gerald Solensky Jr., Chief Executive Officer at Zomedica. “Given his successful animal health background, Robert is here to help bring our unique pipeline of therapeutics and diagnostics to the global markets.” DiMarzo comes to Zomedica with more than 25 years of animal health leadership experience in manufacturing, distribution, marketing and sales, and strategic operations for pharmaceutical and diagnostic companies. Prior to joining Zomedica, DiMarzo served as Principal with DiMarzo Business Consulting where he advised business, financial, and government entities on globalization, business development, and growth strategies within the animal health and human biotechnology industries. Prior to that, DiMarzo was Vice President of Commercial Development and Product Category Management with the global animal health group at Henry Schein. Before that, he was Executive Chairman of the U.S. animal health distributor Ivesco Holdings LLC. Under his leadership, Ivesco transformed into a successful category leader that was acquired in November 2013 by MWI Veterinary Supply, Inc., now a wholly-owned subsidiary of AmerisourceBergen. DiMarzo also served as Executive Vice President of Sales and Marketing for the veterinary diagnostic startup Scandinavian Micro Biodevices, purchased by Zoetis in 2016. DiMarzo started his animal health career with Elanco, the animal health division of Eli Lilly, followed by 15 years with Pfizer Animal Health (now Zoetis) where he held several director-level and executive leadership positions in Brazil, Italy, and the U.S., leaving the company as President of U.S. Operations. During his tenure, DiMarzo elevated Pfizer’s U.S. Animal Health division to that of a recognized industry leader. A former U.S. Naval Officer and Peace Corps volunteer, DiMarzo has a Master of Business Administration from Harvard University and Bachelor of Science from Brown University. About Zomedica With U.S. operations based in Ann Arbor, Michigan, Zomedica is a veterinary pharmaceutical and health care solutions company creating products for companion animals (canine, feline and equine) by focusing on the unmet needs of clinical veterinarians. Zomedica is developing a diversified portfolio to include innovative drugs, drug-delivery technologies, diagnostics, and devices. With multiple clinical veterinarians in executive management, it is Zomedica’s mission to give veterinarians the opportunity to lower costs, increase productivity, and grow revenue while better serving the animals in their care. For more information, visit www.ZOMEDICA.com. Reader Advisory Neither TSX Venture Exchange nor its Regulation Services Provider (as that term is defined in the policies of the TSX Venture Exchange) accepts responsibility for the adequacy or accuracy of the release. Except for statements of historical fact, this news release contains certain "forward-looking information" within the meaning of applicable securities law. Forward-looking information is frequently characterized by words such as "plan", "expect", "project", "intend", "believe", "anticipate", "estimate" and other similar words, or statements that certain events or conditions "may" or "will" occur. Although we believe that the expectations reflected in the forward-looking information are reasonable, there can be no assurance that such expectations will prove to be correct. We cannot guarantee future results, performance or achievements. Consequently, there is no representation that the actual results achieved will be the same, in whole or in part, as those set out in the forward-looking information. Forward-looking information is based on the opinions and estimates of management at the date the statements are made, and are subject to a variety of risks and uncertainties and other factors that could cause actual events or results to differ materially from those anticipated in the forward-looking information. Some of the risks and other factors that could cause the results to differ materially from those expressed in the forward-looking information include, but are not limited to: uncertainty as to whether our strategies and business plans will yield the expected benefits; availability and cost of capital; the ability to identify and develop and achieve commercial success for new products and technologies; the level of expenditures necessary to maintain and improve the quality of products and services; changes in technology and changes in laws and regulations; our ability to secure and maintain strategic relationships; risks pertaining to permits and licensing, intellectual property infringement risks, risks relating to future clinical trials, regulatory approvals, safety and efficacy of our products, the use of our product, intellectual property protection and the other risk factors disclosed under our profile on SEDAR at www.sedar.com. Readers are cautioned that this list of risk factors should not be construed as exhaustive. The forward-looking information contained in this news release is expressly qualified by this cautionary statement. We undertake no duty to update any of the forward-looking information to conform such information to actual results or to changes in our expectations except as otherwise required by applicable securities legislation. Readers are cautioned not to place undue reliance on forward-looking information.


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Now more than ever, parents are aware of the ingredients that go into the meals they prepare for their families—relying on safety information and recommendations from nutrition experts to ensure they’re making the best choices possible. As health and nutrition trends continue to evolve for those we love most, it is important for pet parents to look at the ingredients in their pet’s food with the same lens they use to evaluate the rest of their family’s food choices. Many times, food price doesn’t translate to safety, and that’s why it’s critical for pet food makers to place premium ingredients and safety testing at the top of their priority list. So this spring, premium pet food maker Natural Balance is offering the top four priorities for pet food you can believe in. These four springtime priorities make up Natural Balance's Buy With Confidence promise. The promise goes far above and beyond what can be found from the majority of pet food makers. It focuses on the pet first, and includes sourcing premium quality ingredients for all pet food formulas, a dedication to rigorous safety testing, and providing nutrition experts to help every pet parent find the right food for their pet. Ultimately, Natural Balance prioritizes what’s right for its end consumer: the pet. The four priorities are: Natural Balance picks only the best fruits, vegetables, and premium animal protein sources for its pet foods. These premium ingredients provide nutrients that support healthy skin and coats. Just as important as the ingredients Natural Balance puts in its food are the ingredients it leaves out. Artificial flavors, chemical preservatives, poultry by-products (read: beaks and feet from birds), and refined grains are completely absent in its formulas. Every batch of food goes through extensive tests in a certified laboratory before it leaves Natural Balance's facilities. By referencing the product manufacturing codes on the bag, pet parents can go to the Natural Balance website (http://www.naturalbalanceinc.com) to see the individual testing results for each and every bag of food. Every nutrition expert that makes up Natural Balance's Customer Care team is a veterinary technician with degrees in Animal Health Science, with a devotion to helping pet parents find the food that’s exactly right for their pet’s unique nutritional needs and taste. These nutrition experts are available via online chat, email, or phone to talk in-depth with pet parents. Consumers and their pets should always be completely satisfied with the food they consume. So if they’re not happy, Natural Balance will refund the product, and its veterinary technicians can help them find the formula that works for their pet—not stopping until it gets it right. Natural Balance shares the same concerns as pet parents do. That’s why it works hard every day to build confidence in everything it does.


News Article | February 12, 2017
Site: www.techtimes.com

Ticked Off! Here's What You Need To Know About Lyme Disease Zika Virus - What You Should Know Mongolia's iconic antelopes are facing extinction after more than 2,000 had died from a disease that originated from livestock. Thousands more of the critically endangered are feared to die as the disease will spread during winter when free-ranging saiga herds migrate and mix. It might result to an upsurge of deaths in the spring. Scientists from the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) said that 2,500 Saiga died in Western Mongolia from a disease caused by a virus known as Peste des Petits Ruminants (PPR). PPR is a deadly virus which kills 90 percent of infected animals. It is also called a goat plague because it affects sheep and goats with symptoms of infections include diarrhoea, fever, pneumonia, and mouth sores. The disease was first reported in 1942 in Côte d'Ivoire. It is a livestock disease afflicting sheep and goats in Africa, Middle East, and Asia. In Mongolia's Khovd province, 900 more saigas have disappeared — approximately 10 percent of Mongolia's endangered antelopes. Saiga antelopes (Saiga tatarica) populated the grasslands of Europe and Asia. Their numbers have dwindled from 1.25 million to 50,000 for the last 40 years. The first outbreak of PPR in Mongolia was in September 2016. Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) said the virus spread from China affecting the free-ranging saiga population at shared grazing grounds. Experts do not rule out other possible causes as they also eye Pasteurella multocida bacteria. The equally deadly bacteria had wiped out more than 200,000 of Kazakhtstan's saiga antelope two years ago. The PPR outbreak does not only threaten to wipe out the endangered antelopes but threatens the whole grassland ecosystem as well. Scientists from WCS said the outbreak is the first to have occurred among antelopes and described its spread as "alarming". "The first case of PPR was confirmed in the Saiga on only 2nd January this year," WCS scientist Dr. Enkhtuvshin Shiilegdamba told BBC News. She warned that the PPR outbreak in saiga has raised concern over its impact on the grassland ecosystem in general. Dr. Shiilegdamba noted that "many other species share this same range" with saiga especially during winter. Scientists feared it will affect the food chain once the virus spreads toward the eastern part of Mongolia where an estimated 1.5 million Mongolian gazelles migrate every year. The disappearance of the wildlife in the area will result to a lack of prey for the endemic snow leopard, which will drive them to prey on domesticated livestock. These carnivores will also have greater risk of being shot by farmers. To save the saiga population from extinction, it is a must to immunize goats, sheep, and other domestic livestock in the area. Dr. Amanda Fine of WCS wildlife health program said there is "a need to ensure the disease does not spread to unaffected populations" in order to save the critically endangered Saiga antelope. FAO and the World Organization for Animal Health launched last year a program for the eradication of the disease. Aimed to eradicate PPR worldwide, the program's measures include vaccination, movement control, and quarantine. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


News Article | February 17, 2017
Site: www.techtimes.com

Bird Flu has reared its ugly head in China, leading to fears of a worldwide epidemic, with the discovery that the H7N9 strain of avian flu virus is responsible for the outbreak. It is believed that infection rates due to Bird Flu on poultry farms in the country are possibly higher than thought earlier, as the H7N9 strain has been instrumental in killing over 100 people this winter. Animal experts share that this strain of the virus is deadly as it is difficult to detect the same in geese and chicken. According to the experts, poultry which has been affected by the H7N9 strain show no symptoms or negligible signs of being affected. This implies that the infection can only be detected if health officials or the farmers themselves conduct sporadic tests on their poultry. "There are very few, if any, clinical signs when this (H7N9) virus infects birds, and that's the main reason we're not seeing reporting coming from poultry farms in China," shared Matthew Stone, the Deputy Director General For International Standards and Science at the World Organization for Animal Health,. However, while the poultry may not be impacted by the virus' effects, it is a different story when it comes to humans. The H7N9 strain of avian flu can be detrimental in the case of humans per experts. In December 2016, South Korean farms were affected by the H5N6 strain of the avian flu. This prompted the culling of nearly 26 million birds in the country. However, this strain was not responsible for any deaths. On the other hand, the H7N9 has impacted humans, killing more than 100 people in China, which bears testimony to its detrimental effects. China saw a massive outbreak of the H7N9 virus in January, which according to reports are considered to be four times higher than the 2015 outbreak and around 79 people died due to the same this year. The main reason behind this massive death is due to lack of early detection of the virus strain in the poultry farms. According to the reports by the United Nation's Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO), China is considered to have the largest group of ducks, chicken, and geese, out of which around 11 billion birds were slaughtered in 2014. Per the Centre For Disease Control and Prevention in China, people who were affected with the H7N9 virus were found to have direct connection with poultry, as well as the live markets there. In light of the latest outbreak, on Thursday, Feb. 16, the Chinese Government promised to exercise more control on poultry farms and the transport of chicken and geese to help battle the epidemic, which poses a grave threat to human life. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

A critically endangered species of antelope is dying by the thousands from a deadly infectious disease outbreak in Mongolia, and scientists fear there could be "catastrophic consequences" for the threatened animals and their ecosystem. Since December 2016, about 2,500 Mongolian saiga (Saiga tatarica mongolica) — a unique subspecies of saiga antelope — have died from a livestock virus. Scientists estimate the Mongolian saiga population to be about 10,000, meaning the deadly outbreak has killed about 25 percent of the endangered steppe-dwelling antelope. The virus, known as PPR or peste des petits ruminants, was introduced to the Mongolian saiga population in September, from infected goats and sheep, scientists said. Though the die-off rate has slowed, it could have repercussions throughout the local environment, said Amanda Fine, a veterinarian and associate director of the Wildlife Conservation Society's (WCS) Wildlife Health Program in Asia. [Photos: A 2015 Mass Die-Off of the Endangered Saiga Antelope] "The situation is tragic and widespread," Fine said in a statement. "Along with the impact to the saiga population, this event has the potential to produce cascading catastrophic consequences on the ecosystem. For example, ibex and argali may be affected, and rare snow leopards may suffer the effects of a diminished prey base." PPR, which is also known as sheep and goat plague, is highly contagious and can infect up to 90 percent of an animal herd once introduced, according to the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations. The disease is spread via body fluids, feces and close proximity, and symptoms include fever, anorexia, diffuclty breathing and more. After just a few days affected animals become depressed, very weak, and severely dehydrated, according to the FAO. The FAO and the World Organization for Animal Health are working to eradicate PPR by 2030, but the disease is known to have infected animal populations in more than 70 countries. In Mongolia, a rapid-response team has begun collecting samples from the dead and diseased saiga in an effort to stop the spread of infection and determine how to support the species' recovery. "The best way to prevent PPR is through further immunization of livestock in not only saiga range areas, but [also] other affected-species range areas," Fine said. "Stress-free conditions for recovering saiga and access to food and water resources should be provided in order to save the last population of Mongolian saiga from extinction." The saiga face other threats aside from illness. People use the antelope's horns in traditional medicine, making the animals vulnerable to poaching. More than 90 percent of the saiga population has been lost in recent decades, according to WCS officials.


News Article | February 16, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

A critically endangered species of antelope is dying by the thousands from a deadly infectious disease outbreak in Mongolia, and scientists fear there could be "catastrophic consequences" for the threatened animals and their ecosystem. Since December 2016, about 2,500 Mongolian saiga (Saiga tatarica mongolica) — a unique subspecies of saiga antelope — have died from a livestock virus. Scientists estimate the Mongolian saiga population to be about 10,000, meaning the deadly outbreak has killed about 25 percent of the endangered steppe-dwelling antelope. The virus, known as PPR or peste des petits ruminants, was introduced to the Mongolian saiga population in September, from infected goats and sheep, scientists said. Though the die-off rate has slowed, it could have repercussions throughout the local environment, said Amanda Fine, a veterinarian and associate director of the Wildlife Conservation Society's (WCS) Wildlife Health Program in Asia. [Photos: A 2015 Mass Die-Off of the Endangered Saiga Antelope] "The situation is tragic and widespread," Fine said in a statement. "Along with the impact to the saiga population, this event has the potential to produce cascading catastrophic consequences on the ecosystem. For example, ibex and argali may be affected, and rare snow leopards may suffer the effects of a diminished prey base." PPR, which is also known as sheep and goat plague, is highly contagious and can infect up to 90 percent of an animal herd once introduced, according to the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations. The disease is spread via body fluids, feces and close proximity, and symptoms include fever, anorexia, diffuclty breathing and more. After just a few days affected animals become depressed, very weak, and severely dehydrated, according to the FAO. The FAO and the World Organization for Animal Health are working to eradicate PPR by 2030, but the disease is known to have infected animal populations in more than 70 countries. In Mongolia, a rapid-response team has begun collecting samples from the dead and diseased saiga in an effort to stop the spread of infection and determine how to support the species' recovery. "The best way to prevent PPR is through further immunization of livestock in not only saiga range areas, but [also] other affected-species range areas," Fine said. "Stress-free conditions for recovering saiga and access to food and water resources should be provided in order to save the last population of Mongolian saiga from extinction." The saiga face other threats aside from illness. People use the antelope's horns in traditional medicine, making the animals vulnerable to poaching. More than 90 percent of the saiga population has been lost in recent decades, according to WCS officials.


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.marketwired.com

TORONTO, ONTARIO--(Marketwired - Feb. 14, 2017) - Integran (Canada) is pleased to announce that it has entered into an exclusive partnership agreement with Farm Medix (New Zealand) to introduce a bactericidal hoof strap (DermaShield™) for the prevention and therapeutic treatment of bovine hoof ailments in the global dairy industry. "Integran is very pleased to have entered into this partnership with Farm Medix, known for their sustainable approach to enhancing productivity in the dairy industry by promoting bovine health," says Gino Palumbo, CEO of Integran Technologies Inc. "We are also pleased to be introducing our nanostructured copper technology to the agricultural sector," he says, adding that "the efficacy and safety of the technology as an antibacterial agent has already been demonstrated on human touch surfaces." "After much costly research, we are excited to be working with Integran Technologies to offer a solution regarding the second most expensive Dairy Cattle Disease, and arguably the most prevalent Bovine disease" says Farm Medix Ltd. Director Leon Spurrell. "Integran already operate in a variety of high-tech industries, and we're pleased to have adapted that technology to benefit the Primary Industries Sector." He adds, "the problems with lameness in stock spills over past obvious animal discomfort, affecting milk productivity, fertility and reducing the productive lifespan of the animals." He emphasises: "Without using an antibiotic, DermaShield™ is preventative as well as therapeutic. This unique device significantly reduces time and money spent on farm, and addresses important issues such as dismissing with chemical (sometimes carcinogenic) footbath waste." "Trials have been highly effective and cost savings are immense, so it's better for the animal, the farmer and the environment." Farm Medix (www.farmmedix.com) is an innovative Animal Health Company, focused on making milk production more sustainable via three main areas: water, mastitis and lameness. Now proudly a multiple award winning company, Farm Medix has spent more than 7 years developing technologies to provide solutions, services and products globally. Integran Technologies Inc. (www.integran.com) is a leading international supplier of nanotechnology-enabled metallurgical products and services. Via partnerships with global technology leaders in various sectors (e.g., defence, aerospace, etc.). Integran strives to bring true value to its partners through materials innovations. Integran operates under AS9100C/ISO9001 and is registered with the Canadian Controlled Goods Program.


News Article | February 9, 2017
Site: www.techtimes.com

Zika Virus - What You Should Know Ebola - What You Should Know The South Korean government has placed the country on highest alert as a second strain of foot-and-mouth disease was confirmed three days after a first outbreak was reported, officials said Thursday. The A-type strain of foot-and-mouth disease was discovered at a Yeoncheon dairy farm, some 50 miles north of the capital Seoul, where at least 10 cows were found to have contracted the strain, according to food industry policy deputy minister Kim Kyeong-kyu. After the O-type of the strain was detected southeast of the country, the Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs ministry raised the country's alert status one level to the maximum. The ministry has since then issued a travel ban for all livestock in South Korea, while ordering tougher quarantine and sterilization protocols. As of Wednesday, Feb. 8, at least 826 cattle have been culled, the minister said. About 86 live-stock markets in South Korea will be shut down while the travel ban is in place. Officials could not tell when the new ban will be lifted. The ministry said this is the first time that two different strains of the same virus were reported in the country at the same time. Since 2000, seven out of eight cases of foot-and-mouth disease in South Korea were of the O-type strain. In 2010, the government last raised the foot-and-mouth disease alert level at maximum, when the country grappled its worst-ever outbreak. Seven types of viruses are known to cause foot-and-mouth disease, which mostly affects cloven-hoofed wildlife and livestock. The country has taken all emergency measures against the disease, including a nationwide vaccination and a movement control order to contain the spread of the virus. The ministry is currently conducting an epidemiological survey on all routes taken by workers and livestock infected by the new strain. Researchers will send analyses of both type O and A strains to the World Health Organization (WHO) for Animal Health for detailed inspections. All cattle in South Korea have been re-vaccinated against the O-type of the strain, and the livestock would need to be vaccinated again against the A-type virus. Meanwhile, Kyung-gyu said the government is looking to import more supplies of vaccine from a French institution. Last year South Korea had to kill more than 33 million farm birds as it tried to contain the outbreak of bird flu. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


News Article | February 20, 2017
Site: www.prnewswire.co.uk

The global animal health market is expected to reach USD 58.4 billion by 2025, according to a new study by Grand View Research, Inc. The market is driven by technological advancements in veterinary care, which are anticipated to serve future growth opportunities to the market. For instance, MediLabSecure, a laboratory network project, was initiated with an aim of identifying emerging viruses and pathogens in 19 countries in the Mediterranean regions. In addition, emergence of veterinary health information systems, specifically in the developed economies, is expected to provide high growth potential in future. With the help of these systems, data generated in veterinary clinics can be uploaded on the internet, which can be further shared with other researchers and clinicians. The incorporation of this technology will facilitate real-time analysis of fluctuations in disease prevalence. As a consequence of the aforementioned factors, it is presumed that there will be significant improvement in the overall penetration rate of animal health products, which is also anticipated to fuel the market demand as well as the revenue to unprecedented heights. Browse full research report with TOC on "Animal Health Market Size & Forecast By Product (Feed Additives, Pharmaceuticals, Vaccines), By Animal Type (Production Animal, Companion Animal), By Region (North America, Europe, Asia Pacific, Latin America, MEA), And Trend Analysis, 2014 - 2025" at: http://www.grandviewresearch.com/industry-analysis/animal-health-market Further key findings from the study suggest: Grand View Research has segmented the animal health market on the basis of product, animal type, and region: Grand View Research, Inc. is a U.S. based market research and consulting company, registered in the State of California and headquartered in San Francisco. The company provides syndicated research reports, customized research reports, and consulting services. To help clients make informed business decisions, we offer market intelligence studies ensuring relevant and fact-based research across a range of industries, from technology to chemicals, materials and healthcare.

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