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Marina del Rey, CA, United States

Blaskovic M.,Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich | Rosenkrantz W.,Animal Dermatology Clinic | Neuber A.,Derm4Pets Clinic | Sauter-Louis C.,Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich | Mueller R.S.,Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich
Veterinary Journal | Year: 2014

Recent studies have shown that immunological aberrations and epidermal barrier defects could be important in the pathogenesis of canine atopic dermatitis (CAD) and that oral polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) might influence the epidermal barrier. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a spot-on formulation containing PUFAs and essential oils on pruritus and lesions caused by CAD. Forty-eight privately owned dogs of different breeds, ages and genders diagnosed with atopic dermatitis were included in a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, multicentre clinical trial. Dogs were treated with a spot-on formulation containing PUFAs and essential oils or placebo on the dorsal neck once weekly for 8. weeks. Before and after the study, CAD extent and severity index-03 (CADESI-03) and pruritus scores were determined by veterinarians and owners, respectively.There was significantly more improvement in CADESI-03 and pruritus scores in the treatment group than in the placebo group (P=0.011 and P=0.036, respectively). Additionally, more dogs improved by at least 50% in CADESI-03 and pruritus scores in the treatment group than in the placebo group (P=0.008 and P=0.070, respectively). No adverse reactions were observed. The topical preparation containing PUFAs and essential oils was a safe treatment and beneficial in ameliorating the clinical signs of CAD. © 2013 The Authors.


The purposes of this study were to determine whether the storage mite, Tyrophagus putrescentiae, could survive and thrive on dog food and if mould growth was important to their survival. All of the chambers (n = 42) were started with 10 female mites and evaluated every other day for mite survival and for the spontaneous development of mould. Ten chambers tested the effect of low moisture on mite survival. Eight chambers were used as positive and negative controls (n = 4 each); positive control mites were fed Fleischmann's((R)) yeast and negative controls had no food source. Three dog foods were evaluated in the same manner. Four chambers had food but mould development was limited by replacing the food kernel every 48 h and four chambers were allowed to grow mould. Mites grown in chambers without moisture died from desiccation within 5 days. The termination point was day 34 when all mites in the negative control group (moisture but no food) died. Although T. putrescentiae survived and grew on all three commercial dog foods, there was no statistically significant difference in mites counts among the dog foods (P < 0.10). Mite counts in the 'no' mould and mould groups ranged from 8 to 11 and 144 to 245, respectively, and differences were significant (P < 0.0001). This study found that T. putrescentiae is a fungivorous storage mite that can grow and flourish on dog food. The study demonstrated that the presence of mould positively influences mite viability, while low relative humidity can result in detrimental consequences for T. putrescentiae.


Spriggs M.,Mesker Park Zoo and Botanic Garden | Reeder C.,Animal Dermatology Clinic
Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine | Year: 2012

A 59-yr-old female Nile hippopotamus (Hippopotamus amphibius) was diagnosed and treated for severe dermatitis. Lesions included large areas of depigmentation, erosions, and ulcerations on glabrous skin areas, limbs, and perineal region. Histopathologic lesions included a markedly edematous, focally eroded, ulcerative to necrotic epidermis; foci of keratinocyte apoptosis; and a mixed suppurative dermatitis. Most of the dermal vessels had variable hyalinized walls with plump endothelial cells and frequent intramural neutrophils, and some vessels had vascular thrombi consistent with vasculitis. Culture of the lesions yielded beta-hemolytic Streptococcus, Morganella morgannii, and Enterococcus sp. The hippopotamus was successfully treated with sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim, amoxicillin, and pentoxifylline for more than 2 mo, and the condition did not recur over the subsequent 16 mo. Copyright © 2012 by American Association of Zoo Veterinarians.


Griffies J.D.,Animal Dermatology Clinic
Compendium (Yardley, PA) | Year: 2013

Hyperadrenocorticism (HAC) is a common endocrinopathy in dogs. With better recognition of the disease, more cases are being presented to clinicians for management. Mitotane, a 3- to 4-decade-old therapy, remains a viable and useful option for management of this disease. Thorough education and understanding of the drug are important, however, as the learning curve of how to manage its effects can be significant. Trilostane, a newer option for management of HAC, offers a simplified protocol and, often, smoother and faster control of the disease. It also requires a comfortable knowledge of expected outcome and possible adverse effects. With either drug, careful monitoring and client communication are crucial.


Canfield M.S.,Animal Dermatology Clinic | Wrenn W.J.,Orange County Vector Control District
Veterinary Dermatology | Year: 2010

The purposes of this study were to determine whether the storage mite, Tyrophagus putrescentiae, could survive and thrive on dog food and if mould growth was important to their survival. All of the chambers (n = 42) were started with 10 female mites and evaluated every other day for mite survival and for the spontaneous development of mould. Ten chambers tested the effect of low moisture on mite survival. Eight chambers were used as positive and negative controls (n = 4 each); positive control mites were fed Fleischmann's® yeast and negative controls had no food source. Three dog foods were evaluated in the same manner. Four chambers had food but mould development was limited by replacing the food kernel every 48 h and four chambers were allowed to grow mould. Mites grown in chambers without moisture died from desiccation within 5 days. The termination point was day 34 when all mites in the negative control group (moisture but no food) died. Although T. putrescentiae survived and grew on all three commercial dog foods, there was no statistically significant difference in mites counts among the dog foods (P < 0.10). Mite counts in the 'no' mould and mould groups ranged from 8 to 11 and 144 to 245, respectively, and differences were significant (P < 0.0001). This study found that T. putrescentiae is a fungivorous storage mite that can grow and flourish on dog food. The study demonstrated that the presence of mould positively influences mite viability, while low relative humidity can result in detrimental consequences for T. putrescentiae. © 2009 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 ESVD and ACVD.

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