Lincoln, CA, United States
Lincoln, CA, United States

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PASADENA, Calif., March 2, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Animal Dermatology Clinic (ADC) Pasadena is now offering a new treatment that speeds up the healing process for pets, with Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (HBOT). Introduced in human medicine as the primary treatment for decompression...


MARINA DEL REY, Calif., Nov. 29, 2016 /PRNewswire/ -- Animal Dermatology Clinic Marina del Rey is proud to announce that Dr. Mollie Mesman has achieved Diplomate status and joins the ranks of nearly 300 board-certified veterinary dermatologists in the United States. To achieve board...


Lo K.L.,Animal Dermatology Clinic | Rosenkrantz W.S.,Animal Dermatology Clinic
Veterinary Dermatology | Year: 2016

Background: Canine bacterial and Malassezia paronychia are common secondary complications of atopic dermatitis and adverse food reactions. Hypothesis/Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare three different sampling methods for claw fold cytology and to evaluate the numbers of bacteria, Malassezia yeast and inflammatory cells. Animals: Sixty client-owned dogs were classified into three groups: (A) normal dogs; (B) allergic dogs with no clinical evidence of claw disease (brown staining, erythema, swelling, crusts or exudates); and (C) allergic dogs with clinical paronychia. Methods: A prospective, blinded, split-plot study design was used. Claw folds from each dog were sampled using either a toothpick, tape preparation or direct impression smear. Slides were evaluated by two investigators for inflammatory cells, nuclear streaming, debris, corneocytes, yeast, intracellular (IC) cocci, extracellular (EC) cocci, IC rods and EC rods. For each parameter, data were compared between groups and between methods. Inter-reader agreements were calculated. Results: Group C had significantly higher values of EC cocci and corneocytes than Groups A or B. Although Malassezia organisms were more prevalent in allergic dogs than normal dogs, the counts were not significantly different. There were significantly higher numbers of Malassezia organisms (P = 0.0016) and EC cocci (P = 0.0106) retrieved from samples collected with a toothpick compared to other methods. Tape preparations were associated with significantly more debris and corneocytes (both P < 0.0001) and impression smears with significantly more nuclear streaming (P = 0.0468). Conclusions and clinical importance: Sample collection using a toothpick optimizes the value of cytological results when sampling allergic dogs with clinical paronychia. © 2016 ESVD and ACVD


Griffies J.D.,Animal Dermatology Clinic
Compendium (Yardley, PA) | Year: 2013

Hyperadrenocorticism (HAC) is a common endocrinopathy in dogs. With better recognition of the disease, more cases are being presented to clinicians for management. Mitotane, a 3- to 4-decade-old therapy, remains a viable and useful option for management of this disease. Thorough education and understanding of the drug are important, however, as the learning curve of how to manage its effects can be significant. Trilostane, a newer option for management of HAC, offers a simplified protocol and, often, smoother and faster control of the disease. It also requires a comfortable knowledge of expected outcome and possible adverse effects. With either drug, careful monitoring and client communication are crucial.


Canfield M.S.,Animal Dermatology Clinic | Canfield M.S.,Animal Hospital of Regency Park | Wrenn W.J.,Orange County Vector Control District
Veterinary Dermatology | Year: 2010

The purposes of this study were to determine whether the storage mite, Tyrophagus putrescentiae, could survive and thrive on dog food and if mould growth was important to their survival. All of the chambers (n = 42) were started with 10 female mites and evaluated every other day for mite survival and for the spontaneous development of mould. Ten chambers tested the effect of low moisture on mite survival. Eight chambers were used as positive and negative controls (n = 4 each); positive control mites were fed Fleischmann's® yeast and negative controls had no food source. Three dog foods were evaluated in the same manner. Four chambers had food but mould development was limited by replacing the food kernel every 48 h and four chambers were allowed to grow mould. Mites grown in chambers without moisture died from desiccation within 5 days. The termination point was day 34 when all mites in the negative control group (moisture but no food) died. Although T. putrescentiae survived and grew on all three commercial dog foods, there was no statistically significant difference in mites counts among the dog foods (P < 0.10). Mite counts in the 'no' mould and mould groups ranged from 8 to 11 and 144 to 245, respectively, and differences were significant (P < 0.0001). This study found that T. putrescentiae is a fungivorous storage mite that can grow and flourish on dog food. The study demonstrated that the presence of mould positively influences mite viability, while low relative humidity can result in detrimental consequences for T. putrescentiae. © 2009 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2010 ESVD and ACVD.


The purposes of this study were to determine whether the storage mite, Tyrophagus putrescentiae, could survive and thrive on dog food and if mould growth was important to their survival. All of the chambers (n = 42) were started with 10 female mites and evaluated every other day for mite survival and for the spontaneous development of mould. Ten chambers tested the effect of low moisture on mite survival. Eight chambers were used as positive and negative controls (n = 4 each); positive control mites were fed Fleischmann's((R)) yeast and negative controls had no food source. Three dog foods were evaluated in the same manner. Four chambers had food but mould development was limited by replacing the food kernel every 48 h and four chambers were allowed to grow mould. Mites grown in chambers without moisture died from desiccation within 5 days. The termination point was day 34 when all mites in the negative control group (moisture but no food) died. Although T. putrescentiae survived and grew on all three commercial dog foods, there was no statistically significant difference in mites counts among the dog foods (P < 0.10). Mite counts in the 'no' mould and mould groups ranged from 8 to 11 and 144 to 245, respectively, and differences were significant (P < 0.0001). This study found that T. putrescentiae is a fungivorous storage mite that can grow and flourish on dog food. The study demonstrated that the presence of mould positively influences mite viability, while low relative humidity can result in detrimental consequences for T. putrescentiae.


Stich A.N.,Animal Dermatology Clinic | Rosenkrantz W.S.,Animal Dermatology Clinic | Griffin C.E.,Animal Dermatology Clinic
Veterinary Dermatology | Year: 2014

Background: Canine atopic dermatitis is a genetically predisposed inflammatory skin disease often requiring multimodal treatment. There is a need to find further low-risk adjunctive therapies. Hypothesis/Objectives: To evaluate the localized effect of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on the paws of dogs with atopic dermatitis using a localized canine atopic dermatitis severity score (LCADSS) and owner localized pruritic visual analog score (LPVAS) in comparison to treatment with a placebo. Animals: Thirty client-owned dogs with symmetrical pedal pruritus due to canine atopic dermatitis. Methods: Dogs were randomly assigned into two groups. In each group, one paw was treated with LLLT and one paw treated with a placebo laser (comparing either both fore- or hindpaws). Treatments were administered at 4 J/cm2 (area from carpus/tarsus to distal aspect of digit 3) three times per week for the first 2 weeks and two times per week for the second 2 weeks. Scores were assessed for each paw at weeks 0, 2, 4 and 5. Results: There were no significant differences in LCADSS or LPVAS between LLLT and placebo treatments between weeks 0 and 5 (P = 0.0856 and 0.5017, respectively). However, LCADSS and LPVAS significantly decreased from week 0 at weeks 2, 4 and 5 in both LLLT and placebo groups (P < 0.0001 for all). Conclusions and clinical importance: Low-level laser therapy is not an effective localized treatment for pedal pruritus in canine atopic dermatitis. © 2014 ESVD and ACVD.


LOUISVILLE, Ky., Nov. 29, 2016 /PRNewswire/ -- Animal Dermatology Clinic Louisville is proud to announce that Dr. Catherine Milley has achieved Diplomate status and joins the ranks of nearly 300 board-certified veterinary dermatologists in the United States. To achieve board certification...


TUSTIN, Calif., Nov. 29, 2016 /PRNewswire/ -- Animal Dermatology Clinic Tustin is proud to announce that Dr. Kimberly Lo has achieved Diplomate status and joins the ranks of nearly 300 board-certified veterinary dermatologists in the United States. To achieve board certification in...


PASADENA, Calif., Nov. 29, 2016 /PRNewswire/ -- Animal Dermatology Clinic Pasadena is proud to announce that Dr. Charli Dong has achieved Diplomate status and joins the ranks of nearly 300 board-certified veterinary dermatologists in the United States. To achieve board certification in der...

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