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Animal Clinic

Soo, Japan
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A dog owner in Colorado urges marijuana users to be more careful with their weed after an incident with pot-laced food that sickened her Golden Retriever. Patty Moore contacted a veterinarian after her dog, Chance, started to act strange. She said that her 10-year-old pet could not stand to eat, as if the dog's legs did not work at all. She later learned from the veterinarian that the dog likely ingested marijuana as indicated by some telltale signs that include the animal appearing drunk, depressed, and stupefied for seemingly no reason at all. Moore said that she brought her dog on a walk in Denver's Highlands neighborhood park just a few days after the 4/20 pro-marijuana rally, where she believes her dog may have eaten or licked a THC-laced edible such as a brownie or a cookie. Unlike humans, animals do not get high when they are under the influence of pot. The cannabis plant has dozens of cannabinoids, which include THC (tetrahydrocannabinol) and CBD (cannabidiol). The THC contains psychoactive properties responsible for making people feel high. Unfortunately, THC is toxic to animals. "Marijuana is considered a toxin to pets, and there are no recommended uses," the Humane Society of Boulder Valley wrote in a report. "Some animals become highly agitated from marijuana, while others exhibit signs of depression. There have been studies that show THC may have antiseizure effects, while other studies indicate THC may provoke seizures." Allison Jenkins, of the Highlands Animal Clinic, said that dogs that ingest marijuana can be affected for several days. Veterinarians may help induce vomiting in the animal if the condition is identified early. Otherwise, pet owners can only provide supportive care. Although pets can quickly overcome the symptoms, there have been several deadly cases of animals that accidentally ate highly concentrated marijuana-laced food. Fortunately, Chance fully recovered. It appears that Chance's case is not remote at all. Since Colorado voters legalized marijuana in 2012, which was followed by dispensaries opening two years later, veterinarians have reported a rise in the incidences of pets, mostly dogs, that have gotten into people's stash. The Pet Poison Helpline, which has seen a 200 percent increase in marijuana toxicity cases, said dogs and cats can be poisoned by cannabis from secondhand smoke exposure or direct ingestion of food laced with THC. It also cited signs that pet owners should watch out for. "In dogs and cats poisoned by marijuana, clinical signs can be seen within 3 hours, and include severe depression, walking as if drunk, lethargy, coma, low heart rate, low blood pressure, respiratory depression, dilated pupils, hyperactivity, vocalization and seizures. Vomiting is often seen with dogs despite the 'anti-emetic (anti-vomiting) qualities of THC," it said. After the incident with her dog, Moore said that she wants pot users to be aware of how their habits may impact other people and animals. © 2017 Tech Times, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.


COUNCIL BLUFFS, Iowa, March 26, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- MediVet stem cell therapy, offered at Animal Clinic of Council Bluffs and Glenwood Veterinary Clinic, provides pets and owners with a way to address health concerns in cats and dogs. Pet owners can address conditions such as arthritis, fracture, soft tissue damage and more with advanced stem cell therapy. The procedure and processing are done on-site and pets can return home the same day. Pet owners can improve the quality of life for aging or injured cats and dogs. Enjoy the companionship of beloved pets for years to come with stem cell therapy at Animal Clinic of Council Bluffs and Glenwood Veterinary Clinic. MediVet offers an advanced stem cell therapy that uses a pet’s own stem cells for a session. This allows pet owners the ability to tap into a beloved pet’s own inherent ability to heal without ethical concerns. Dormant stem cells are separated from fat cells and once stimulated, can be reintroduced into damaged areas to facilitate the healing process. Stem cell therapy can benefit pets with arthritis, soft tissue damage, fractures, degenerative myelopathy, liver and kidney failure, auto-immune conditions and more. There have not been any significant negative side-effects observed from thousands of animals that have been treated with MediVet’s stem cell therapy. This low-risk treatment has helped over 95 percent of animals show improvement. Aging pets can experience discomfort, arthritis, and degenerative joint disease. Stem cells taken from a pet and reintroduced do not result in a risk of rejection and activated stem cells can become any cell needed. Stem cell therapy can significantly improve the ability of a pet to move and reduce pain. A vet places a pet under general anesthesia before collecting 2-4 tablespoons of fat. A highly trained vet tech processes the sample taken. It only takes approximately 20 minutes to collect the fat required. Stem cells are re-administered on site and the pet can go home the day of the procedure. “We are pleased to offer pets and owners this advanced treatment that can facilitate the healing process for a range of health conditions,” said Dr. Melissa Harrer. “Stem cell therapy helps with arthritic symptoms and more and often improves mobility. Learn whether or not your pet is a candidate for this revolutionary procedure today.” Dr. Melissa Harrer of Animal Clinic of Council Bluffs and Glenwood Veterinary Clinic serves pets and residents in and around their two locations. Patients receive the highest level of veterinary care at these full-service small animal clinics. Services include comprehensive wellness exams, heartworm and intestinal parasite testing, oral health care, appropriate pharmaceuticals, preventative immunizations, and behavior counseling. Call (712) 323-0598 to learn about stem cell therapy treatments for pets or visit http://animalclinicofcb.com/ for more information.


News Article | November 8, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

Animal shelters often carry the weight of the pet overpopulation problem in the U.S. Approximately 3.9 million dogs and 3.4 million cats enter animal shelters nationwide each year. Employees and volunteers spend countless hours serving all of these animals, often with limited resources. To acknowledge their hard work and dedication to animal welfare, community members can celebrate National Animal Shelter Appreciation Week, which runs from November 6 to 12. The Texas Veterinary Medical Association (TVMA) encourages community members to support their local shelters and rescue organizations. People can express appreciation in a number of ways, including volunteering or thanking volunteers for their work. “If you offer to volunteer, I know very little shelters that have more volunteers than they know what to do with,” said TVMA member Wendy Blount, DVM, recipient of TVMA’s Companion Animal Practitioner of the Year Award, who has performed hundreds of low-cost spay and neuter procedures on cats and dogs at local shelters. “There is usually a great need for volunteers at shelters. Most shelters are understaffed.” According to Dr. Blount, who works at Ward Animal Hospital in Nacogdoches, Texas, and Southwood Drive Animal Clinic in Lufkin, Texas, animal shelters in Texas are trying to keep up with the pet overpopulation problem. Companion animals in shelters typically are returned to their owners, adopted or, unfortunately, euthanized. “Texas is an area in this country that has more dogs and cats than homes available for them,” Dr. Blount said. “These are challenges the community has, and the more of us that try to step up with a solution the better. The animal shelters are doing the best they can with the resources they have to do something to make things better.” One effort that helps shelters and fights pet overpopulation is community access to low-cost spay-and-neuter facilities. This ultimately decreases the number of animals admitted into shelters. Shelters also may serve fewer animals if owners take personal responsibility and get their pets microchipped. Lost pets who have a form of identification are more likely to be reunited with their families and not stay in shelters. “What it really takes is a few people to lead the effort,” Dr. Blount said. “You can have a lot of people that are willing to be the foot soldiers but then they don’t know what to do and they really have no idea how to apply for grants. If someone else will organize the effort, they will show up.” To celebrate this appreciation week, community members can give an animal a forever home, donate money and in-kind items to local shelters, volunteer or send volunteers a thank-you note, teach children about the importance of good animal welfare practices and urge family members and friends to join the cause. National Animal Shelter Appreciation Week was founded in 1996 by the Humane Society of the United States. About the Texas Veterinary Medical Association Founded in 1903, the Texas Veterinary Medical Association is a professional association composed of more than 3,700 veterinarians committed to protecting public health, promoting high educational, ethical and moral standards within the veterinary profession and educating the public about animal health and its relationship to human health. For more information, call 512/452-4224 or visit http://www.tvma.org.


News Article | November 2, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

November is National Pet Diabetes Month, a time for pet owners to educate themselves on the signs of diabetes and its risk factors. While the existence of diabetes in humans is well-known, not everyone knows that diabetes can affect our pets too. If a pet is lethargic, excessively thirsty or frequently urinating, take it to be examined by a veterinarian because these signs may mean the pet is diabetic. With early diagnosis and proper care, a pet with diabetes can live a happy, healthy and active life. Diabetes is caused by the body’s inability to process or release proper amounts of insulin, resulting in high blood glucose levels. Treating diabetes in dogs most often requires insulin injections, but in cats it can sometimes be managed by weight loss and diet changes. Once your veterinarian has diagnosed a pet with diabetes, he or she will determine the most effective management plan for the owner to follow. “Diabetic animals require frequent monitoring, including blood tests, and insulin-dependent diabetics typically require injections every 12 hours,” said former TVMA president Lori Teller, DVM, DABVP, CVJ, who practices at Meyerland Animal Clinic in Houston. “It is much easier to prevent diabetes than it is to treat it, especially in cats, so maintain your pet at an appropriate weight and get regular veterinary exams. If your pet is displaying the signs of diabetes, have it examined very soon before it progresses to a life-threatening state.” While diabetes can’t always be prevented, obesity has shown to be a contributing factor, especially in cats. Other risk factors in dogs include age, genetics and intact females. Dog breeds that have a higher risk of developing diabetes include cocker spaniels, pomeranians, golden retrievers and dachshunds. Age, genetics, disorders such as chronic pancreatitis or hyperthyroidism and neutering in males are among the risk factors in cats. There is no cure for diabetes, so effective management of the disease is crucial to a pet’s quality of life. Partner with a veterinarian to establish a treatment to ensure a happy and active life for your pet. For more information on diabetes in pets, visit http://www.texvetpets.org/article/diabetes-mellitus-in-your-dog-and-cat. About the Texas Veterinary Medical Association Founded in 1903, the Texas Veterinary Medical Association is a professional association composed of more than 3,700 veterinarians committed to protecting public health, promoting high educational, ethical and moral standards within the veterinary profession and educating the public about animal health and its relationship to human health. For more information, call 512/452-4224 or visit http://www.tvma.org.


News Article | February 22, 2017
Site: globenewswire.com

TOPEKA, Kan., Feb. 22, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Animal Clinic of North Topeka, P. A. today announced its support of National Pet Dental Health Month. This special month is sponsored by the AVMA (American Veterinary Medical Association), a non-profit veterinary organization, and is meant to raise awareness of the need for dental care in companion animals. Animal Clinic of North Topeka recognizes that dental care is needed to prevent pain and debilitation in pets and offers a full array of services to keep the animals' mouths healthy and free of problems. Just as with humans, dogs and cats can develop a full array of dental problems if care is not taken to prevent them. These include cavities, cracking and breaking of teeth, periodontal disease, and more. Even so, many people still think that animals don't need dental care. National Pet Dental Health Month was created to help dispel this myth and improve care among the pet population. "It's a common misconception that dogs and cats have teeth that take care of themselves. Domestic pets are in very different conditions than their wild counterparts. This is good for the animals in most ways – it provides a steady food supply, protection from predators, and treatment for disease – but it does have a couple of drawbacks. One of the drawbacks is that commercial pet food does not adequately remove tartar from the teeth," explained Dr. Bryan Stancliffe, DVM. Several measures are recommended for preserving the health of the teeth of dogs and cats. The first is the same as for humans: brushing the teeth. Since pets can't brush their own, owners should attempt to do it for them. If started young, the majority of pets will learn to tolerate this on a daily basis. Older animals, however, may refuse to go along with the procedure. For them, special tartar-fighting treats are available. Though these aren't quite as effective as a toothbrush, they are better than providing nothing at all. The next step is the dental cleaning. In pets, this requires general anesthesia, so it is done on an as-needed basis. A veterinarian will let the pet owner know when this is recommended. Professional cleanings are essential for preventing periodontal disease. If larger problems have arisen, tooth extraction may be needed. This is typically done instead of root canal treatment. It is also required if a tooth has cracked, broken, or otherwise developed problems that would cause pain to the pet. Animal Clinic of North Topeka, P. A. offers teeth cleaning and extractions for pets. They also offer a full array of other veterinary services, parasite prevention, emergency appointments, boarding, and grooming. For more information on their services and hours, visit their website at http://animalclinicoftopeka.com/.


News Article | October 30, 2016
Site: globenewswire.com

WICHITA FALLS, Texas, Oct. 30, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Dr. Jessica Yoder, new veterinarian, will join the practice, shares Callfield Companion Animal Clinic. She will join the respected veterinary team that includes Drs. Elisa and James Spears, founders and owners, and associate veterinarians, Dr. Jennifer Schmidt, Dr. Heidi Vogtsberger and Dr. Donna Bruce. The Mississippi State University graduate, Dr. Jessica Yoder, becomes part of the team as Callfield Companion Animal Clinic expands to serve the veterinary needs of Wichita Falls pets and their owners. The team welcomes Dr. Yoder’s special interest in animal dentistry and animal behavior and knows that patients will appreciate her veterinary talent and high standard of care.   Dr. Jessica Yoder received her degree from Mississippi State University in 2009. Her special interests include animal dentistry and behavior for cats and dogs. Her goals are to foster the human-animal bond and help owners care for their beloved pets. Dr. Yoder is married with a child and maintains a busy household that includes three dogs, three cats and a number of fish. She also owns a herd of registered Texas Longhorn cattle. “I am excited to join the experienced veterinary team at Callfield Companion Animal Clinic and serve the veterinary needs of pets and owners,” said Dr. Jessica Yoder. “As a veterinarian and pet owner of animals large and small, I know how pets become part of the family and how important it is to provide them with quality veterinary care for urgent needs, injury and illness. However, ongoing care is necessary to keep pets healthy and allow them to avoid common pet illnesses. My interest in dentistry and animal behavior helps pets owners better understand the needs of their pets and how to improve their oral care. I look forward to working with pet owners and helping ensure the health and well-being of beloved animal companions.” Dr. Jessica Yoder, veterinarian at Callfield Companion Animal Clinic, accredited by the American Animal Hospital Association, serves the residents of the Wichita Falls area. The staff of six vets and 15 staff members are dedicated to delivering the highest standards in veterinary care. A variety of pets are treated at this animal clinic which serves dogs, cats, small mammals, pocket pets, reptiles and birds. Patients can find necessary forms online to complete at home. Services at Callfield Companion Animal Clinic include wellness care, diagnostic services, surgery, emergency care, senior pet care, nutritional advice and boarding. Pets and owners benefit from the expertise and compassion demonstrated from the veterinary team at Callfield Companion Animal Clinic. Call (940) 692-7000 to schedule an appointment with the new Callfield Companion Animal Clinic vet, Dr. Jessica Yoder, and find out about the veterinary services at this Wichita Falls animal clinic. Visit http://callfieldcompanion.com/ for more details.


News Article | December 18, 2016
Site: globenewswire.com

LAKE FOREST, Calif., Dec. 18, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Many of us are already making plans for the holidays. We are checking airfares, making lists, and even getting some early shopping done. If pet owners need boarding services for their pets during this busy holiday season, the time to reserve space at Lake Forest Animal Clinic is now. Their premium pet boarding is convenient and offers pets a caring and nurturing environment where pets can truly feel at home. Every boarded pet will receive professional and compassionate care during their stay at Lake Forest Animal Clinic. Pets are housed in a comfortable, safe, temperature-regulated setting and checked on every 30 minutes. Dogs are walked three times each day and pets are fed a healthy and easily digestible Purina EN diet. Cats are boarded in a separate quiet room away from dogs. The entire Lake Forest Animal Clinic team is totally focused on the health and happiness of their visitors. The veterinarian supervised kennel team will look after cats and dogs and monitor for changes in appetite, water consumption, weight, vomiting, diarrhea, coughing, skin irritations, and other health problems. If pets need any medications or treatments while boarding, their technicians will be happy to administer them. If pets require veterinary care while boarding, they will attempt to reach the owner on their emergency number to discuss the pet's medical needs. All pets must be up-to-date on vaccinations to be boarded at Lake Forest Animal Clinic to decrease the possibility of the spread of contagious diseases. If pets are picked up by 9 am the morning of scheduled release, there is no charge for that day. Lake Forest Animal Clinic also offers professional pet grooming services. If pet grooming services are scheduled for the final day of boarding, then there won’t be a charge for that day. Owner Melissa A. Byers, D.V.M. says, “At Lake Forest Animal Clinic, we’re aware that the holidays are an extremely busy time of year for most people. Trying to determine the best course of action for pet care while traveling can be stressful. We’re here to give pet owners peace of mind.  We treat your pets like the beloved family members they are.”  Lake Forest Animal Clinic is located in Suite P at 24301 Muirlands Boulevard in Lake Forest, California. Those interested in booking holiday pet boarding or grooming services may call (949) 837-7660. Additional information about Lake Forest Animal Clinic is also available on their website at http://lakeforestanimalclinic.com/.


News Article | December 18, 2016
Site: globenewswire.com

LAKE FOREST, Calif., Dec. 18, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Many of us are already making plans for the holidays. We are checking airfares, making lists, and even getting some early shopping done. If pet owners need boarding services for their pets during this busy holiday season, the time to reserve space at Lake Forest Animal Clinic is now. Their premium pet boarding is convenient and offers pets a caring and nurturing environment where pets can truly feel at home. Every boarded pet will receive professional and compassionate care during their stay at Lake Forest Animal Clinic. Pets are housed in a comfortable, safe, temperature-regulated setting and checked on every 30 minutes. Dogs are walked three times each day and pets are fed a healthy and easily digestible Purina EN diet. Cats are boarded in a separate quiet room away from dogs. The entire Lake Forest Animal Clinic team is totally focused on the health and happiness of their visitors. The veterinarian supervised kennel team will look after cats and dogs and monitor for changes in appetite, water consumption, weight, vomiting, diarrhea, coughing, skin irritations, and other health problems. If pets need any medications or treatments while boarding, their technicians will be happy to administer them. If pets require veterinary care while boarding, they will attempt to reach the owner on their emergency number to discuss the pet's medical needs. All pets must be up-to-date on vaccinations to be boarded at Lake Forest Animal Clinic to decrease the possibility of the spread of contagious diseases. If pets are picked up by 9 am the morning of scheduled release, there is no charge for that day. Lake Forest Animal Clinic also offers professional pet grooming services. If pet grooming services are scheduled for the final day of boarding, then there won’t be a charge for that day. Owner Melissa A. Byers, D.V.M. says, “At Lake Forest Animal Clinic, we’re aware that the holidays are an extremely busy time of year for most people. Trying to determine the best course of action for pet care while traveling can be stressful. We’re here to give pet owners peace of mind.  We treat your pets like the beloved family members they are.”  Lake Forest Animal Clinic is located in Suite P at 24301 Muirlands Boulevard in Lake Forest, California. Those interested in booking holiday pet boarding or grooming services may call (949) 837-7660. Additional information about Lake Forest Animal Clinic is also available on their website at http://lakeforestanimalclinic.com/.


News Article | December 18, 2016
Site: globenewswire.com

LAKE FOREST, Calif., Dec. 18, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Many of us are already making plans for the holidays. We are checking airfares, making lists, and even getting some early shopping done. If pet owners need boarding services for their pets during this busy holiday season, the time to reserve space at Lake Forest Animal Clinic is now. Their premium pet boarding is convenient and offers pets a caring and nurturing environment where pets can truly feel at home. Every boarded pet will receive professional and compassionate care during their stay at Lake Forest Animal Clinic. Pets are housed in a comfortable, safe, temperature-regulated setting and checked on every 30 minutes. Dogs are walked three times each day and pets are fed a healthy and easily digestible Purina EN diet. Cats are boarded in a separate quiet room away from dogs. The entire Lake Forest Animal Clinic team is totally focused on the health and happiness of their visitors. The veterinarian supervised kennel team will look after cats and dogs and monitor for changes in appetite, water consumption, weight, vomiting, diarrhea, coughing, skin irritations, and other health problems. If pets need any medications or treatments while boarding, their technicians will be happy to administer them. If pets require veterinary care while boarding, they will attempt to reach the owner on their emergency number to discuss the pet's medical needs. All pets must be up-to-date on vaccinations to be boarded at Lake Forest Animal Clinic to decrease the possibility of the spread of contagious diseases. If pets are picked up by 9 am the morning of scheduled release, there is no charge for that day. Lake Forest Animal Clinic also offers professional pet grooming services. If pet grooming services are scheduled for the final day of boarding, then there won’t be a charge for that day. Owner Melissa A. Byers, D.V.M. says, “At Lake Forest Animal Clinic, we’re aware that the holidays are an extremely busy time of year for most people. Trying to determine the best course of action for pet care while traveling can be stressful. We’re here to give pet owners peace of mind.  We treat your pets like the beloved family members they are.”  Lake Forest Animal Clinic is located in Suite P at 24301 Muirlands Boulevard in Lake Forest, California. Those interested in booking holiday pet boarding or grooming services may call (949) 837-7660. Additional information about Lake Forest Animal Clinic is also available on their website at http://lakeforestanimalclinic.com/.


News Article | December 18, 2016
Site: globenewswire.com

LAKE FOREST, Calif., Dec. 18, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Many of us are already making plans for the holidays. We are checking airfares, making lists, and even getting some early shopping done. If pet owners need boarding services for their pets during this busy holiday season, the time to reserve space at Lake Forest Animal Clinic is now. Their premium pet boarding is convenient and offers pets a caring and nurturing environment where pets can truly feel at home. Every boarded pet will receive professional and compassionate care during their stay at Lake Forest Animal Clinic. Pets are housed in a comfortable, safe, temperature-regulated setting and checked on every 30 minutes. Dogs are walked three times each day and pets are fed a healthy and easily digestible Purina EN diet. Cats are boarded in a separate quiet room away from dogs. The entire Lake Forest Animal Clinic team is totally focused on the health and happiness of their visitors. The veterinarian supervised kennel team will look after cats and dogs and monitor for changes in appetite, water consumption, weight, vomiting, diarrhea, coughing, skin irritations, and other health problems. If pets need any medications or treatments while boarding, their technicians will be happy to administer them. If pets require veterinary care while boarding, they will attempt to reach the owner on their emergency number to discuss the pet's medical needs. All pets must be up-to-date on vaccinations to be boarded at Lake Forest Animal Clinic to decrease the possibility of the spread of contagious diseases. If pets are picked up by 9 am the morning of scheduled release, there is no charge for that day. Lake Forest Animal Clinic also offers professional pet grooming services. If pet grooming services are scheduled for the final day of boarding, then there won’t be a charge for that day. Owner Melissa A. Byers, D.V.M. says, “At Lake Forest Animal Clinic, we’re aware that the holidays are an extremely busy time of year for most people. Trying to determine the best course of action for pet care while traveling can be stressful. We’re here to give pet owners peace of mind.  We treat your pets like the beloved family members they are.”  Lake Forest Animal Clinic is located in Suite P at 24301 Muirlands Boulevard in Lake Forest, California. Those interested in booking holiday pet boarding or grooming services may call (949) 837-7660. Additional information about Lake Forest Animal Clinic is also available on their website at http://lakeforestanimalclinic.com/.

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