Visakhapatnam andhra Pradesh, India
Visakhapatnam andhra Pradesh, India

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Pratyusha K.,College of St. Joseph | Prasad M.G.,College of St. Joseph | Radhakrishna A.N.,College of St. Joseph | Saujanya K.,Sri Sai Dental college and Research Institute | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research | Year: 2017

Introduction: Tooth development is extensively used for age estimation as a part of forensic science. Aim: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reliability of Demirjian's, Cameriere's and modified Cameriere's population-specific regression equation methods in the dental age estimation of West Godavari children. Materials and Methods: The study included orthopantomograms (OPG) of 60 children of West Godavari district with age group between 9 to 14 years on whom all the three methods were used for age estimation. The OPG were traced with the help of a tracing paper and lead pencil and the appropriate dimensions were measured. Age estimation was done based on canine calcification stage as per Demirjian's method and measurements of the seven permanent left mandibular teeth using Cameriere's formula and modified population-specific regression equation obtained for the South Indian population from Cameriere's formula. The resultant data were subjected to statistical analysis by student’s paired t-test. Results: The estimated age was closer to the chronological age when the modified Cameriere's population-specific regression equation was used (p=0.68); whereas, the difference was more in Demirjian's method (p=0.008) followed by Cameriere's method (p<0.001). Conclusion: The method using modified Cameriere's population-specific regression equation exhibited a least significant difference in chronological and dental age assessment in children of West Godavari district as compared to the other two methods. © 2017, Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research. All rights reserved.


Saxena S.,Institute of Dental science | Lakshminarayan N.,Bapuji Dental College | Gudli S.,GSL Dental College | Kumar M.,Anil Neerukonda Institute of Dental Science
Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research | Year: 2017

Introduction: From the oral health perspective, it is well established that microorganisms have an important role in caries aetiology. From the dawn of civilization, herbal plants have served an array of roles. Triphala a tradtional herbal Ayurvedic formula consists of three native fruits of india including Terminalia Chebula (T. chebula), Terminalia Bellirica (T. bellirica) and Embilica Officinalis (E. officinalis). As per Ayurvedic Formulary of India (AFI) Triphala is prepared by combining a 1:1:1 mixture of ground dry fruits called myrobalans. Till date, an inadequate number of clinical researches on herb based mouth rinses have been reported in Asia, especially in India and other Southeast Asian countries (where these products are most accepted and widely used). The present study was planned to assess the effectiveness of Triphala with its three constituents. Aim: The objective of this study was to determine the effect of Triphala, T. chebula, T. bellirica and E. officinalis aqueous extract rinses separately on Streptococcus mutans count at various time intervals. Materials and Methods: This is a double-blind, linear cross over, within group experimental trial conducted among subjects visiting the Department of Public Health Dentistry aged 15 to 40 years. In this design, subjects received all of the treatments sequentially in time. The independent variables to be assessed in this study were all the four interventions of herbal preparations used and the dependent variable assessed is anti bacterial efficacy. Each subject receives two or more different treatments. All the subjects were exposed to all four interventions: 1) T. chebula; 2) T. bellirica; 3) E. officinalis; and 4) Triphala and were provided 15 ml of the freshly prepared 10% rinse. The subjects were instructed not to eat or drink between salivary samples collection. Post rinse unstimulated salivary samples were collected at five minutes and 60 minutes intervals. All the salivary samples were transferred immediately to microbiological laboratory in sterile containers within one hour for microbiological analysis. Results: The mean Colony Forming Units (CFUs) of S. mutans with Triphala when compared to other three intervention was significantly reduced at 5 minutes and 60 minutes (p=0.001). E. officinalis showed least reduction of mean CFUs when compared to other three groups. Conclusion: It can be concluded that all four rinses were effective in reducing S. mutans CFUs, but 10% Triphala has greater efficacy than its other constituents. © 2017, Journal of Clinical and Diagnostic Research. All rights reserved.


Mohammed R.B.,GITAM Dental College and Hospital | Lalithamma T.,Cks Teja Dental College And Hospital | Varma D.M.,Anil Neerukonda Institute of Dental science | Sudhakar K.N.V.,Kalinga institute of dental science | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Natural Science, Biology and Medicine | Year: 2014

Dental fear, anxiety and phobia have consistently been reported as widespread problems that persist despite the technological advances that have made dentistry less painful and less uncomfortable. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of dental anxiety (DA) and its relation to age and sex among Coastal Andhra (Visakhapatnam) population. Materials and Methods: A randomized controlled study was designed among 340 individuals at GITAM Dental College and Hospital, Visakhapatnam. The sample for the study consisted of 180 female and 160 male subjects between 15 and 65 years of age; all were supplied with two questionnaires (Corah DA scale [CDAS] and Clarke and Rustvold dental concerns assessment scale describing anxiety provoking stimuli. The Mann-Whitney U-test and the Kruskal-Wallis test were applied (significance level P < 0.05). The correlations between the two questionnaires were calculated using the Spearman's rank correlation coefficient. Results: Two questionnaires were collected from all 340 individuals and the Indian translation of both instruments was found to be internally reliable with a Cronbach's alpha of 0.093. Overall prevalence of DA was high (77.4%) but severe (22.6%) anxiety (phobia) was low. Kruskal-Wallis test showed a significant relation between age and DA. The mean CDAS scores were high in 25-35 (11.08) and low in 55-65 (9.45) year age groups. Mann-Whitney U test showed significant relation between sex and DA. Mean CDAS score levels were significantly higher in females (10.88) than in males (9.96) (P < 0.0001). Conclusion: Patients anxious about dental procedures are often more difficult to treat. If Dentists become aware about the level of DA among their patients, they can anticipate patient's behavior and can be prepared to take behavioral/pharmacological measures to reduce anxiety levels. © Journal of Natural Science, Biology and Medicine.


PubMed | Asan Memorial Dental College and Hospital, Anil Neerukonda Institute of Dental science, Christian Dental College, Bapuji Dental College and Hospital and Sarabha Dental College & Hospital
Type: | Journal: Case reports in dentistry | Year: 2015

Adenomatoid Odontogenic Tumor (AOT) is a well-established benign epithelial lesion of odontogenic origin. Rightfully called the master of disguise, this lesion has been known for its varied clinical and histoarchitectural patterns. Not only does AOT predominantly present radiologically as a unilocular cystic lesion enclosing the unerupted tooth (which is commonly mistaken as a dentigerous cyst) but the lesion also presents rarely with a cystic component histopathologically. We present one such unusual case of cystic AOT associated with an impacted canine, mimicking a dentigerous cyst. The present case aims to highlight the difference between cystic AOT and dentigerous cyst radiographically. The exact histogenesis of AOT and its variants still remains obscure. An attempt has been made to hypothesize the new school of thought regarding the origin of AOT.


PubMed | MS Ramaiah Dental College, Anil Neerukonda Institute of Dental science and Bapuji Dental College and Hospital
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of family medicine and primary care | Year: 2015

Tooth brushing is most common method of maintaining oral hygiene. In removing plaque and other soft debris from the teeth, tooth brushes become contaminated with bacteria, blood, saliva and oral debris. These contaminated tooth brushes can be a source of infection.The aim of the present study was to evaluate the presence of microorganisms in the tooth brushes and to investigate the effect of disinfectants such as chlorhexidine gluconate, sodium hypochlorite and water to decontaminate them.Twenty-one children were asked to brush their teeth for 5 days with a tooth brush. The tooth brushes were put in Robertsons Cooked Meat broth and were observed for growth of Streptococcal microorganisms. These tooth brushes were then placed in disinfectants such as 0.2% chlorhexidine gluconate (Group I), 1% sodium hypochlorite (Group II) and water (Group III) for 24 hrs and then cultured again. Reduction of growth of microorganisms was seen in Group I, Group II and remnants of growth seen in Group III.We conclude that the use of disinfectant for a tooth brush is a must for every individual at least at regular intervals.


PubMed | Adhiparasakthi Dental College and Hospital, Tagore Dental College and Anil Neerukonda Institute of Dental science
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of pharmacy & bioallied sciences | Year: 2015

The aim of this study was to find the prevalence of the mandibular incisive canal, evaluate its location and dimensions using cone beam computer tomography (CBCT) in Indian population.CBCT scan images of 120 subjects were analyzed for the presence of the mandibular incisive canal, its location, size, and its length. The distance between the incisive canal and the buccal and lingual plate of the alveolar bone, and the distance from the canal to the inferior border of the mandible were also measured to position the canal in the mandible.About 71.66% of the CBCT scans of Indian subjects examined showed the presence of the Incisive canal, of which 48.33% exhibited canals bilaterally and 23.33% showed unilateral canals. 28.33% of the subjects CBCT scans did not exhibit the presence of incisive nerve canal. The average length of the incisive canal was 10.173 mm. The average diameter of the Incisive canal in the CBCT scans was 2.578 mm. The distance from the Inferior border of the mandible to (a) the origin of the Incisive canal was 9.425 mm and (b) to the apex of the Incisive canal was 9.095 mm. The distance from the buccal cortex of the mandible to (a) the origin of the incisive canal was 1.48 mm and (b) to the apex of the incisive canal was 4.476 mm. The distance from the lingual cortex of the mandible to (a) the origin of the incisive canal was 4.464 mm and (b) to the apex of the incisive canal was 5.561 mm.The presence, location, and dimensions of the mandibular incisive canal are an additional required data that needs to be elicited before planning an inter-foraminal placement of implants.


PubMed | Adhiparasakthi Dental College and Hospital, Tagore Dental College and Anil Neerukonda Institute of Dental science
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of pharmacy & bioallied sciences | Year: 2015

The aim of this study was to find the difference in perceptibility and acceptability of changes done to various color coordinates of matched teeth, between trainee dental surgeons, and lay person.A photograph with a set of matched central incisor teeth was selected. In one of the central incisors, the color coordinates (hue, value, and chroma) were altered to a preset value. These pictures were presented to trainee dental surgeons and lay person and their level of perception of color change and acceptance of color change was registered and compared.It was found that trainee dental surgeons fared better in perceiving the color change and accepted less of the color changed specimens. The dimension of color that was more discerned both by lay person and trainee dental surgeons was value, hue, and last chroma.When compared to a lay person, dental surgeons are more acute in perceiving color changes and do not accept the color difference between teeth to a higher degree.


Gupta D.,Institute of Dental Science | Devaki M.,Ragas Dental College | Dommaraju N.,Pritam Dental Care | Srinivas K.T.,Anil Neerukonda Institute of Dental science | And 4 more authors.
Holistic Nursing Practice | Year: 2015

Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) are one of the most important occupational health issues in health care workers. Musculoskeletal pain is an occupational health problem for dental professionals, particularly dentists. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) can be helpful in managing and preventing these MSDs. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of MSDs among dentists residing in east India and the use of CAM therapies for the management of MSDs among dentists. Dentists (N = 1082) residing in east India, registered under the Dental Council of India, were surveyed. A questionnaire comprising demographic profile, questions related to MSD among dentists, use of CAM therapies for MSD management, source of CAM information. Data analysis was done using SPSS (version 17), and data were presented in tabular and graphic forms. Univariate and bivariate analyses were done, with P<.05 considered as significant. A response rate of 81% (n = 877) was obtained, revealing that 71% (n = 623) of dentists suffered from MSD. The use of CAM was reported among 83% (n = 517) and conventional therapy among 15% (n = 94) of dentists, and 2% (n = 12) of dentists with MSD do not use any type of treatment modality. Complementary and alternative medicine represents a group of diverse medical and health care systems, practices, and products that are not considered to be part of conventional medicine. CAM therapies have improved quality of life and have given a new meaning to it, especially to dentists who suffer from MSD. Copyright © 2015 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc.


Gupta D.,Institute of Dental Science | Momin R.K.,Jaipur Dental College | Mathur A.,NIMS Dental College | Srinivas K.T.,Anil Neerukonda Institute of Dental science | And 4 more authors.
North American Journal of Medical Sciences | Year: 2015

Background: Dental problems in the preschool children are neglected by their parents as the deciduous teeth are going to shed off, and hence considered to be of no importance and more of economic burden if attended to them. Aims: This study was to determine the caries prevalence in preschool children (3-5-year-old) of rural Moradabad district, to analyze the specific pattern of dental caries experience in this population and to assess the treatment needs among them. Material and Methods: Children within the age group of 3-5 years attending Anganwadi centers of rural Moradabad district were included in the study. Caries diagnosis was based on decayed, extracted, filled surface (defs) and the treatment needs were recorded using World Health Organization (WHO) oral health assessment form 1997. Results: Out of 1,500 children examined, 48.7% males and 52.6% females did not require any treatment. The mean decayed, extracted, filled teeth (deft) value was found to be significantly high in 5-year-old participants when compared to 3-year-old participants (P < 0.01). Majority of the children required one surface filling followed by two surface fillings, caries arresting sealant care, extraction, crown bridge element, pulp care, and space maintainer. Conclusion: The most common pattern was pit and fissure, then maxillary anterior pattern, posterior proximal pattern, and posterior buccal lingual smooth surface pattern. The mean deft value was higher in males as compared to females. There is a greater need for oral health education among parents and teachers. © 2015, North American Journal of Medical Sciences. All rights reserved.


PubMed | Anil Neerukonda Institute of Dental science and GITAM Dental College
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of oral and maxillofacial pathology : JOMFP | Year: 2016

Epidermoid cysts are benign malformations that can be encountered anywhere in the body and are rarely observed in the oral cavity accounting for <0.01% of all cysts of the oral cavity. They can be classified as either congenital or acquired without any clinical or histologic differences. Our literature search did not find any report of a congenital epidermoid cyst located in the soft palate associated with a complete palatal cleft in an infant. This is a case report of a 9-month-old female patient who had a cleft palate with an associated soft tissue mass at the junction of soft palate and uvula.

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