Entity

Time filter

Source Type


Sun Y.,Anhui Medical University | Sun Y.,Anhui Provincial Key Laboratory of Population Health and Aristogenics Hefei | Tao F.,Anhui Medical University | Tao F.,Anhui Provincial Key Laboratory of Population Health and Aristogenics Hefei | And 2 more authors.
Annals of Human Biology | Year: 2012

Aim: To provide up-to-date pubertal characteristics in a representative population of boys from both urban and rural areas of China. Subjects and methods: The China Puberty Research Collaboration enrolled 15 011 boys of Chinese Han ethnicity aged 6.018.9 years in eight regions including both urban and rural areas. Stages of genital and pubic hair development were assessed by trained physicians according to the Tanner method. Testicular volume was evaluated with a Prader orchidometer. Results: Median age for onset of testicular volume of 4 mL or greater was 11.02 years. Median age for onset of genital (G2), pubic hair development (PH2) and spermarche was 11.24 years, 12.67 years and 14.32 years, respectively. Boys with BMI ≥ 85th percentile reached the onset of TV ≥ 4 ml (11.09 years), G2 (11.34 years) and G3 (13.01 years) later than boys with a normal BMI (10.95 years, 11.1 years and 12.88 years, respectively). Urban boys achieved pubertal milestones at an earlier age than rural peers except for G5 (13.4 vs 13.76 years) and PH5 (12.86 years vs 13.14 years). Conclusions: There is an asynchronous pattern in the onset of puberty among Chinese boys. Higher BMI is related to early pubertal onset but fast pubertal progression. Urban boys achieved onset of puberty earlier than rural boys in China. © Informa UK, Ltd. Source


Sun Y.,Anhui Medical University | Sun Y.,Anhui Provincial Key Laboratory of Population Health and Aristogenics Hefei | Liu Y.,Anhui Medical University | Liu Y.,Anhui Provincial Key Laboratory of Population Health and Aristogenics Hefei | And 9 more authors.
Psychoneuroendocrinology | Year: 2016

There is still insufficient understanding of the underlying processes that contribute to internalizing problems of early maturing adolescents. The purpose of this study is to examine the longitudinal pattern of early maturation and its effects on morning cortisol and depressive symptoms among a general population of adolescent cohort aged 8-11 years old at baseline (boys = 424, girls = 288). Results suggest newly-onset early maturation boys have 3-times more likely to have depressive symptoms at 1-year follow-up (adjusted odds ratio = 3.197, 95% confidence interval = 1.595-6.405); while in girls, stable early maturation individuals are more than 4 times as likely to have depressive symptoms (adjusted odds ratio = 4.566, 95% confidence interval = 1.882-11.077). Morning cortisol has moderating effects in the association of depressive symptoms with newly-onset early maturation in boys and stable early maturation in girls. These findings possibly explain current inconsistent results regarding association between earlier maturation and risk of depression in adolescents. Further longitudinal studies are needed to explore HPG-HPA interactions in adolescence, which may be critical to understanding the heightened susceptibility of mental health problems. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. Source

Discover hidden collaborations