Anhui Key Laboratory of Eco engineering and Bio technique

Hefei, China

Anhui Key Laboratory of Eco engineering and Bio technique

Hefei, China
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Zhang M.,Anhui University | Zhang M.,Anhui Key Laboratory of Eco engineering and Bio technique | Li J.,Anhui University | Li J.,Anhui Key Laboratory of Eco engineering and Bio technique | And 6 more authors.
Current Zoology | Year: 2010

Though females are generally more selective in mate choice, males may also benefit from mate choice if male reproductive success is limited by factors other than simply the number of female mates, and if females differ in short-term reproductive potential. We studied male mate choice in a free-ranging troop of Tibetan macaques Macaca thibetana at Mt. Huangshan, China, from August 2007 to April 2008. We employed focal animal sampling and all occurrence sampling to record sexual related behaviors. Eight adult females were divided into three female quality categories according to the females' age, rank and parity. Using male mating effort as a proxy for male mate choice, we found that males do distinguish female quality and show time-variant mating strategies. Specifically, females with dominant rank, high fecundity, and middle age attracted significantly more males. Our results suggest that female short-term reproductive potential appears to be an important variable in determining male mating effort. Male Tibetan macaques do exercise mate choice for higher quality females as well as reduce useless reproductive cost, which is consistent with the direct benefits theory of mate choice. © 2010 Current Zoology.


Xia D.,Anhui University | Xia D.,Anhui Key Laboratory of Eco engineering and Bio technique | Li J.,Anhui University | Li J.,Anhui Key Laboratory of Eco engineering and Bio technique | And 8 more authors.
American Journal of Primatology | Year: 2012

Grooming among nonhuman primates is widespread and may represent an important service commodity that is exchanged within a biological marketplace. In this study, using focal animal sampling methods, we recorded grooming relationships among 12 adult females in a free-ranging group of Tibetan macaques (Macaca thibetana) at Huangshan, China, to determine the influence of rank and kinship on grooming relationships, and whether females act as reciprocal traders (exchange grooming received for grooming given) or interchange traders (interchange grooming for social tolerance or other commodities). The results showed that: (1) grooming given was positively correlated with grooming received; (2) kinship did not exert a significant influence on grooming reciprocity; and (3) grooming reciprocity occurred principally between individuals of adjacent rank; however, when females of different rank groomed, females tended to groom up the hierarchy (lower ranking individuals groomed higher ranking individuals more than vice versa). Our results support the contention that both grooming reciprocity and the interchange of grooming for tolerance represent important social tactics used by female Tibetan macaques. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.


Jiang T.,Anhui University | Li J.,Anhui University | Li J.,Anhui Key Laboratory of Eco engineering and Bio technique | Li J.,Anhui Normal University | And 5 more authors.
Life Science Journal | Year: 2013

Homosexual mounting behavior in non-human primates is very common, but its function may vary across species. We studied male-male mounting behavior in a wild troop of Tibetan macaques (Macaca thibetana) at Mt.Huangshan China, from August 2010 to May 2011. We used focal behavior sampling and continuous recording to document mounting related behaviors. We found that this behavior occurs among males of all ages, but its frequency decreases with increasing age (P<0.05). Homosexual and heterosexual mountings differ in that the former ones can have 1 or 2 steps, while the latter ones have 4 distinct behaviors. The contexts of male-male mounting varied across the male lifespan. Mounting behavior exhibited during immaturity is crucial to the development of adult homosexual mounting behaviors.


Sun B.,Anhui University | Sun B.,Anhui Key Laboratory of Eco engineering and Bio technique | Li J.,Anhui University | Li J.,Anhui Key Laboratory of Eco engineering and Bio technique | And 4 more authors.
Folia Zoologica | Year: 2010

Tibetan macaques (Macaca thibetana) are a threatened primate species endemic to China. The current taxonomy of the species is based on external morphological and anatomical variations. To further understand the intraspecific variation and relationships among populations, we analyzed 44 mitochondrial DNA control region sequences (475 bp fragment) from individuals across the species range. Results revealed 11 major haplotypes with a high nucleotide diversity (0.792), but nucleotide diversity within haplotype lineages was only 0.042. Neighbor-joining phylogenetic analyses indicated support for four distinct haplotype clades corresponding to regional groups consistent with the recognized subspecies M .t. thibetana, M. t. guizhonensis, M. t. huangshanensis and M. t. pullus. As a result of regional geographic variation and genetic differences, we recommend the four subspecies should be considered different management units for conservation efforts.

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