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Zhu Y.,Anhui Normal University | Zhu Y.,Anhui Key Laboratory of Chemo Biosensing | Tang W.,Anhui Normal University | Chen W.,Anhui Normal University | And 3 more authors.
Journal of Luminescence | Year: 2011

Electrochemiluminescence (ECL) behavior of quinoline in acetonitrile at a glassy carbon electrode was studied. Quinoline in 0.1 mol/L tetrabutylammonium bromide (TBAB) acetonitrile solution exhibited excellent ECL properties using conventional cyclic voltammetry (CV). One ECL peak was observed at -0.5 V. Effects of various factors were investigated. UVvisible absorption spectra measurements confirmed the production of new products after cycling the mixed solution. Fluorescence and ECL spectra measurements got the evidence that the luminophors were the products of quinoline. A possible mechanism process was proposed. © 2011ElsevierB.V.Allrightsreserved.


Zhu Y.,Anhui Normal University | Zhu Y.,Anhui Key Laboratory of Chemo Biosensing | Zhao B.,Anhui Normal University | Li L.,Anhui Normal University | And 4 more authors.
Analytical Letters | Year: 2010

Efficient quenching electrochemiluminescence (ECL) of the Ru(bpy)2+ 3/tripropylamine (TPrA) system by a novel quencher Caffeic acid (CA) has been investigated. The quenching behaviors can be observed with a 100-fold excess of CA over Ru(bpy)2+ 3. The mechanism of quenching is believed to involve energy transfer from the excited-state Ru(bpy)2+* 3 to the electro-chemical oxidation of CA, which was formed at the electrode surface. Photoluminescence experiments coupled with bulk electrolysis support formation of the oxidation product of CA upon electrochemical oxidation. © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.


He Y.,Anhui Key Laboratory of Chemo Biosensing | Sun J.,Anhui Key Laboratory of Chemo Biosensing | Feng D.,Anhui Key Laboratory of Chemo Biosensing | Chen H.,Anhui Key Laboratory of Chemo Biosensing | And 2 more authors.
Biosensors and Bioelectronics | Year: 2015

In this paper, a simple and sensitive photoluminescence method is developed for the hydroquinone quantitation by using graphene quantum dots which simultaneously serve as a peroxidase-mimicking catalyst and a photoluminescence indicator. In the presence of dissolved oxygen, graphene quantum dots with intrinsic peroxidase-mimicking catalytic activity can catalyze the oxidation of hydroquinone to produce p-benzoquinone, an intermediate, which can efficiently quench graphene quantum dots' photoluminescence. Based on this effect, a novel fluorescent platform is proposed for the sensing of hydroquinone, and the detection limit of 5. nM is found. © 2015 Elsevier B.V..


He Y.,Anhui Key Laboratory of Chemo Biosensing | Wang X.,Anhui Key Laboratory of Chemo Biosensing | Sun J.,Anhui Key Laboratory of Chemo Biosensing | Jiao S.,Anhui Key Laboratory of Chemo Biosensing | And 3 more authors.
Analytica Chimica Acta | Year: 2014

In the present work, a highly sensitive and specific fluorescent biosensor for blood glucose monitoring is developed based on hemin-functionalized graphene quantum dots (GQDs) and glucose oxidase (GOx) system. The GQDs which are simply prepared by pyrolyzing citric acid exhibit strong fluorescence and good water-solubility. Due to the noncovalent assembly between hemin and GQDs, the addition of hemin can make hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to destroy the passivated surface of GQDs, leading to significant fluorescence quenching of GQDs. Based on this effect, a novel fluorescent platform is proposed for the sensing of glucose. Under the optimized conditions, the linear range of glucose is from 9 to 300μM, and the limit of detection is 0.1μM. As unique properties of GQDs, the proposed biosensor is green, simple, cost-efficient, and it is successfully applied to the determination of glucose in human serum. In addition, the proposed method provides a new pathway to further design the biosensors based on the assembly of GQDs with hemin for detection of biomolecules. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

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