Time filter

Source Type

Motani R.,University of California at Davis | Jiang D.-Y.,Peking University | Jiang D.-Y.,CAS Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology | Tintori A.,University of Milan | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology | Year: 2014

The Early Triassic ichthyopterygian Chaohusaurus chaoxianensis was previously known from juvenile specimens only. It was considered to represent immature forms of C. geishanensis, which was based on a single adult specimen, because allometric regression lines of the forelimb skeletons suggested that the two name groups fitted along a single growth trajectory. The sample size for the analysis, however, was small (n = 5). We collected new specimens of Chaohusaurus from Majiashan, Chaohu City, Anhui Province, China, through field excavations that started in 2010. New specimens included an immature individual whose forelimb resembled that of mature C. geishanensis, as well as a large adult individual whose forelimb retained the characteristics of immature C. chaoxianensis. Therefore, C. chaoxianensis is not the juvenile of C. geishanensis. With the addition of the new specimens, two growth trajectories are now clearly detected on allometric regression plots (n = 15). The two species are unambiguously distinguished from each other based on a suite of discrete characters that are diagnostic to each species, as well as statistical analyses of forelimb measurements. It is unlikely that the two forms represent the genders of a single species given that C. geishanensis is vastly outnumbered by C. chaoxianensis and completely lacking in major fossiliferous rock layers. Therefore, C. chaoxianensis should be resurrected as a valid species. © by the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology.


Tintori A.,University of Milan | Huang J.-D.,Anhui Geological Museum | Jiang D.A.-Y.,Laboratory of Orogenic Belt and Crustal Evolution | Jiang D.A.-Y.,Peking University | And 5 more authors.
Rivista Italiana di Paleontologia e Stratigrafia | Year: 2014

A new species of Sauricbthys, S. majiasbanensis, is described. It comes from a series of marine vertebrate-bearing beds of the upper member of the Nanlinghu Formation outcropping in the large quarry at the top of Majiashan (Majia Hill) near Chaohu (Hefei City, Anhui Province, China). Its age is Middle Spathian (Olenekian, Early Triassic). This new species deeply differs from the several pre-Spathian species of Sauricbthys mainly for having only two longitudinal scale rows together with a reduced grid-like structure for the neural elements in the vertebral column. Further derived characters are in the endoskeleton of the dorsal and anal fin, where radiais articulate only to anterior lepidotrichia, the posterior ones being supported by the first scale from the caudal pedicle mid-dorsal and mid-ventral rows, deeply imbedded in the body. In addition, the haemal spines of the caudal region are much enlarged and reversed, with their distal parts pointing forwards. Though the skull is lacking, postcranial characters are enough to justify the erection of a new species. This new Saurichthys species, together with other few actinopterygians, can be considered as the oldest assemblage of the Triassic Middle Fish Fauna, which bloomed probably in the early Anisian and widespread especially all over the Tethys for the Middle Triassic and at least the Carnian in the Late Triassic. This new fish assemblage, together with some of the oldest marine reptiles, is considered as the beginning of the actual Triassic recovery among marine vertebrates.


Motani R.,University of California at Davis | Jiang D.-Y.,Peking University | Jiang D.-Y.,CAS Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology | Chen G.-B.,Anhui Geological Museum | And 3 more authors.
Nature | Year: 2015

The incompleteness of the fossil record obscures the origin of many of the more derived clades of vertebrates. One such group is the Ichthyopterygia, a clade of obligatory marine reptiles that appeared in the Early Triassic epoch, without any known intermediates. Here we describe a basal ichthyosauriform from the upper Lower Triassic (about 248 million years ago) of China, whose primitive skeleton indicates possible amphibious habits. It is smaller than ichthyopterygians and had unusually large flippers that probably allowed limited terrestrial locomotion. It also retained characteristics of terrestrial diapsid reptiles, including a short snout and body trunk. Unlike more-derived ichthyosauriforms, it was probably a suction feeder. The new species supports the sister-group relationships between ichthyosauriforms and Hupehsuchia, the two forming the Ichthyosauromorpha. Basal ichthyosauromorphs are known exclusively from south China, suggesting that the clade originated in the region, which formed a warm and humid tropical archipelago in the Early Triassic. The oldest unequivocal record of a sauropterygian is also from the same stratigraphic unit of the region. © 2015 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.


Zhang C.,Institute of Geoanalysis of Anhui Province | Zha S.,Institute of Geoanalysis of Anhui Province | Bi Z.,No.327 Geological Party of Anhui Province | Gong W.,Anhui Geological Museum | And 3 more authors.
Earth Science Frontiers | Year: 2016

Recently, the author has measured Baidashan group section which exposed a sequence of complete and continuous layer on the Henan-Anhui border of southern margin on the north China Block. There are conodonts molecules of the Middle-Late Ordovician in carbonatite of Baidashan group: Belodina compressa,Panderodus gracilis,Pseudobelodina dispansa(?) and Bryozo, Calthrop, Small shells, Archaeostraca etc., which filled the blank of the region that has been no fossil record. According to the characteristics of stratigraphic sequence, lithologic combination, the biota appearance, the ancient sedimentary environment of geography, and combined with a large number of limestone thin section results, it is concluded that the Baidashan group belongs to the Early Paleozoic era. The southern margin of North China massif line was redrawn to Jiangji-Longtan sets. We consider that the conodonts biota in this area should belong to the northern type conodonts geographical partition. © 2016, Editorial Office of Earth Science Frontiers. All right reserved.


PubMed | CAS Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology, Anhui Geological Museum, University of Illinois at Chicago, University of California at Davis and University of Milan
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Nature | Year: 2015

The incompleteness of the fossil record obscures the origin of many of the more derived clades of vertebrates. One such group is the Ichthyopterygia, a clade of obligatory marine reptiles that appeared in the Early Triassic epoch, without any known intermediates. Here we describe a basal ichthyosauriform from the upper Lower Triassic (about 248 million years ago) of China, whose primitive skeleton indicates possible amphibious habits. It is smaller than ichthyopterygians and had unusually large flippers that probably allowed limited terrestrial locomotion. It also retained characteristics of terrestrial diapsid reptiles, including a short snout and body trunk. Unlike more-derived ichthyosauriforms, it was probably a suction feeder. The new species supports the sister-group relationships between ichthyosauriforms and Hupehsuchia, the two forming the Ichthyosauromorpha. Basal ichthyosauromorphs are known exclusively from south China, suggesting that the clade originated in the region, which formed a warm and humid tropical archipelago in the Early Triassic. The oldest unequivocal record of a sauropterygian is also from the same stratigraphic unit of the region.


He X.,Anhui Geological Museum | He X.,CAS Institute of Botany | Wang S.,CAS Institute of Botany | Wan M.,CAS Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology | And 2 more authors.
Journal of Asian Earth Sciences | Year: 2016

The concept of the Cathaysian Flora was originally based on fossils from the Permian of central Shanxi Province in North China but is now recognized to be valid for the flora of much of East Asia during the Carboniferous and Permian periods. Although Gigantopteris Schenck ex Yabe is characteristic and often distinctive of the Cathaysian Flora in general, it has previously not been recorded in Shanxi Province within the central part of the North China. Recent investigations on the Capitanian-Wuchiapingian (middle-late Permian) flora of the Taiyuan East Hill Coalfield in Shanxi have yielded well-preserved specimens of Gigantopteris dictyophylloides Gu and Zhi within the Upper Shihhotse Formation, contained within continental red-beds interpreted as representing a floodplain environment. Discovery of G. dictyophylloides extends the palaeogeographic distribution of the genus and shows that the Permian flora of Shanxi is more typical of the Cathaysian Flora than previously thought. Results also provide new information on the ecology of G. dictyophylloides based on assessments of its occurrence within depositional sedimentary facies from which we conclude that this species thrived in alluvial-fluvial sediments on the North China Block. We also conclude that the red beds of the Upper Shihhotse Formation that yield gigantopterids most likely formed under a seasonally dry climate rather than a vague statement that these red beds were formed generally under arid conditions as previously thought. © 2015 Published by Elsevier Ltd.


Ma J.,China University of Geosciences | Wang S.-J.,CAS Institute of Botany | Wang S.-J.,CAS Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology | He X.-Z.,Anhui Geological Museum | And 2 more authors.
Review of Palaeobotany and Palynology | Year: 2016

Anatomically preserved botryopterid specimens from Cisuralian (early Permian) aged coal balls in Shanxi Province, North China are investigated. Stems are relatively small, branch dichotomously, and possess a haplostele with metaxylem tracheids showing uniseriate scalariform thickenings. Protoxylem groups are associated with the forming of the petiolar trace, and a parenchyma plate appears in the process of separating petiolar traces. The cortex consists of three parts, with inner and middle parenchymatous zones and an outer sclerenchymatous zone. Stems are radially organized and bear helically arranged petioles. Petioles extend from the stems in various orientations while adventitious roots extend through the cauline cortex perpendicular or oblique to the stem. Associated rachides are D-shaped in cross section and the xylem is slightly to conspicuously adaxially curved with 1 protoxylem ridge at each lateral margin. Differences with previously known genera of Botryopteridaceae lead to creation of new genus, Diodonopteris gracilis Ma et al. gen. nov. et sp. nov. that demonstrates features that overlap to some extent with those of previously known genera within Botryopteridaceae. The habit and growth forms of D. gracilis are considered. D. gracilis represents by far the best known plant of Botryopteridaceae recognized from the Cathaysian Flora. © 2016 Elsevier B.V.


Wan M.,CAS Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology | Wan M.,Missouri University of Science and Technology | Zhou W.,Nanjing University | He X.,Anhui Geological Museum | And 2 more authors.
Palaeobiodiversity and Palaeoenvironments | Year: 2016

Autunia conferta (Sternberg) Kerp is one of the best known, earliest and most widespread callipterids in Euramerica during the Cisuralian. Unambiguous A. conferta foliage is for the first time recorded from Cathaysia in the Shanxi Formation of Wuda, Inner Mongolia, North China. Together with the find of Autunia naumannii (Gutbier) Kerp in the lowermost Permian strata of the same region, it proves that the radiation and spatio-temporal distribution of peltasperms was apparently not hampered by the floral provincialism, and it also indicates a mutual migration of floral elements between Cathaysia and Euramerica. Their long stratigraphic range, from the Cisuralian to the Lopingian, demonstrates that callipterids played an important role in the palaeotropical landscape and had a long history in North China during the Permian. The nearly absence of callipterids in typical Cisuralian wetland floras indicates their preference for well-drained settings and uplands. It is inferred that A. conferta lived contemporaneously with the wetland floral elements in Cathaysia during the Cisuralian, but commonly outside the window of preservation. © 2016 Senckenberg Gesellschaft für Naturforschung and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg


Yan M.,CAS Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology | Yan M.,University of Chinese Academy of Sciences | Wan M.,CAS Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology | He X.,Anhui Geological Museum | And 2 more authors.
Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology | Year: 2016

Fossil charcoal is reported for the first time from a Cisuralian coal bed of the Shanxi Formation in the Qiaotou Section, Baode, Shanxi, North China. Based on anatomical characteristics, these charcoal fragments consist of coniferous or cordaitalean xylem, unidentified primary xylem and cordaitalean and possible fern leaves. These charcoal fragments represent the evidence of palaeowildfire taking place in tropical peat swamps during the Cisuralian in Cathaysia. The palaeowildfire is most likely to be a surface fire and burning litter and shrubby vegetation. Fire frequency for this early Permian peat swamp might have been on the order of 176–(294–588)–1429 years, close to modern values. Compared with modern analogues, the North China Block during the Cisuralian was probably wet in general but could be occasionally seasonally dry for short time intervals. Previous charcoal and inertinite records moreover indicate that palaeowildfires were globally common during the Cisuralian. Overall, more wildfire evidence was found in the Artinskian–Kungurian than the Asselian-Sakmarian (except in the Euramerican Realm), probably due to more suitable regional climate, vegetation to fuel fires and taphonomic circumstances. © 2016 Elsevier B.V.


Huang J.,Anhui Geological Museum | Wang X.,University of Texas at Austin | Hu Y.,Anhui Geological Museum | Liu J.,Anhui Geological Museum | And 2 more authors.
PeerJ | Year: 2016

Despite the increasing number of exceptional feathered fossils discovered in the Late Jurassic and Cretaceous of northeastern China, representatives of Ornithurae, a clade that includes comparatively-close relatives of crown clade Aves (extant birds) and that clade, are still comparatively rare. Here, we report a new ornithurine species Changzuiornis ahgmi from the Early Cretaceous Jiufotang Formation. The new species shows an extremely elongate rostrum so far unknown in basal ornithurines and changes our understanding of the evolution of aspects of extant avian ecology and cranial evolution. Most of this elongate rostrum in Changzuiornis ahgmi is made up of maxilla, a characteristic not present in the avian crown clade in which most of the rostrum and nearly the entire facial margin is made up by premaxilla. The only other avialans known to exhibit an elongate rostrum with the facial margin comprised primarily of maxilla are derived ornithurines previously placed phylogenetically as among the closest outgroups to the avian crown clade as well as one derived enantiornithine clade. We find that, consistent with a proposed developmental shift in cranial ontogeny late in avialan evolution, this elongate rostrum is achieved through elongation of the maxilla while the premaxilla remains only a small part of rostral length. Thus, only in Late Cretaceous ornithurine taxa does the premaxilla begin to play a larger role. The rostral and postcranial proportions of Changzuiornis suggest an ecology not previously reported in Ornithurae; the only other species with an elongate rostrum are two marine Late Cretacous taxa interpreted as showing a derived picivorous diet. © 2016 Huang et al.

Loading Anhui Geological Museum collaborators
Loading Anhui Geological Museum collaborators