Cambridge, United Kingdom
Cambridge, United Kingdom

Anglia Ruskin University is a public university in the East of England, United Kingdom. It has about 35,000 students and campuses in Cambridge, Chelmsford and Peterborough. It also shares campuses with the College of West Anglia in King's Lynn, Wisbech and Cambridge.The university was founded in 1858, when the art critic John Ruskin opened the Cambridge School of Art. The school became Anglia Polytechnic after it joined with the Cambridgeshire College of Arts and Technology and the Essex Institute of Higher Education. It became a university in 1992 and was renamed Anglia Ruskin University in 2005. Wikipedia.


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Over the past decade, earthquakes proved to be the deadliest of all European disasters, with almost 19,000 fatalities and direct economic losses of approx. 29 billion. Earthquake Induced Liquefaction Disasters (EILDs) is responsible for tremendous amounts of the structural damages and fatalities; with experiences from recent events giving example of where approx. half of the economic loss was directly caused by liquefaction. Liquefaction is a phenomenon, with previously a low profile until recent earthquake events, in which the stiffness and strength of soil is reduced by seismic activity. With the causes of Liquefaction being known, it is important to recognize the factors that contribute to its occurrence; as well as the resulting hazards. The theory on how to address the subject has been comprehensive, as well as the engineering to reduce its consequences of liquefaction already developed; however, recent findings and advances need to be accurately examined in order to implement mitigation strategies practically. A systematic approach is needed for assessing the possibility of liquefaction on a site, prior to construction, then implementing the most appropriate liquefaction mitigation techniques. However, the variability of circumstances, invariably translates to multiple approaches of implementation, based on the susceptibility of the location to liquefaction, as well as the type and size of structure. The LIQUEFACT project addresses the mitigation of risks to EILD events in European communities with a holistic approach. The project not only deals with the resistance of structures to EILD events, but also, the resilience of the collective urban community in relation to their quick recovery from an occurrence. The LIQUEFACT project sets out to achieve a more comprehensive understanding of EILDs, the applications of the mitigation techniques, and the development of more appropriate techniques tailored to each specific scenario, for both Europe and global.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: RIA | Phase: LCE-21-2015 | Award Amount: 3.74M | Year: 2016

The transition to a low carbon economy needs to achieve multiple aims: competitiveness, protection of the environment, creation of quality jobs, and social welfare. Thus policy-makers and other key stakeholders require tools that need to focus beyond the energy sector by including these other domains of economy, society and the environment. Currently, most available tools lack integration of these important areas despite being tightly connected to the energy sector. Moreover, current energy modelling tools often lack documentation, transparency and have been developed for a specialized insider audience, which makes validation and comparison of results as well as independent review impossible. Our project aims to solve the current needs of integration and transparency by developing a leading-edge policy modelling tool based on WoLiM, TIMES and LEAP models and incorporating Input-Output Analysis, that allows for accounting of environmental, social and economic impacts. The modular design of the tool will take into account the necessary flexibility to deal with different levels and interests of stakeholders at great sectorial and spatial detail. Finally, transparency will be achieved through an open access freeware distribution of the model based on the open access programming language (Python), providing a detailed user manual, addressed to a wider non-specialist audience, and including free internet courses and learning materials.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: IA | Phase: PHC-20-2014 | Award Amount: 4.36M | Year: 2015

As Europes population is ageing, long-term care for elderly citizens will become an increasing cost for society. To manage this transition healthcare policies in the EU and individual Member States are heavily focussed on extending the independent life of the elderly, with the dual aim of increasing their quality of life and reducing the costs of care. Dementia affects more than 6% of people aged 60\ and has a devastating effect on their independence to date, there is no proven intervention to help dementia patients live a fulfilling life for longer. In this project we will build on an innovative patient support tool to develop a mHealth application that is specifically targeted to patients with mild dementia. The tool will help patients to adhere to their treatment and share data with their carers and doctors; carers will use the same application to monitor patients more easily and share their own well-being with doctors. This will slow the patients cognitive and functional decline, avoid carers getting exhausted and reduce costs of emergency care. Our project will comprise two phases: first we will use digital accessibility tools to re-design the existing application for dementia patients. The development will be steered by patients, carers and doctors, through user-centric design: we will collect feedback on each new version of the application until the design is perfectly adapted to the users needs. In the second phase we will pilot the optimised application with 1,100 users (patients \ carers) and 1,100 controls. This will show the clinical and social benefits for patients and carers, as well as financial benefits for the healthcare system. Successful delivery of the pilot will increase patients adherence to treatment (10 %-points), while improving the quality of life of carers and patients. It will save healthcare providers 1,818 / patient / year in care costs and will generate revenue of over 18 million / year for the consortium (Year 5).


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: CSA | Phase: LCE-32-2016 | Award Amount: 2.00M | Year: 2017

SHAPE-ENERGY Social Sciences and Humanities for Advancing Policy in European Energy will develop Europes expertise in using and applying energy-SSH to accelerate the delivery of Europes Energy Union Strategy. Our consortium brings together 7 leading academic partners and 6 highly respected policy, industry and communications practitioners from across the Energy, Social Sciences and Humanities (energy-SSH) research field, to create an innovative and inclusive Platform. Our partners are involved in numerous European energy projects, have extensive, relevant networks in the energy domain, and represent exceptional coverage across SSH disciplines across Europe. These enable us to maximise the impact of our Platform delivery within an intensive 2-year project. SHAPE-ENERGY brings together those who demand energy-SSH research and those who supply that research to collaborate in shaping Europes energy future. A key deliverable will be a 2020-2030 research and innovation agenda to underpin post-Horizon 2020 energy-focused work programmes. It will highlight how energy-SSH can be better embedded into energy policymaking, innovation and research in the next decade. Our SHAPE-ENERGY Platform activities will involve >12,114 stakeholders and begin with scoping activities including: an academic workshop, call for evidence, interviews with business leaders and NGOs, online citizen debates and multi-level policy meetings. We will build on our scoping to then deliver: 18 multi-stakeholder workshops in cities across Europe, an Early Stage Researcher programme, Horizon 2020 sandpits, interdisciplinary think pieces, a research design challenge, and a pan-European conference. Our expert consortium will bring their considerable expertise to overcome difficulties in promoting interdisciplinary and cross-sector working, and reach out to new parts of Europe to create an inclusive, dynamic and open Platform. SHAPE-ENERGY will drive forward Europes low carbon energy future.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: FP7 | Program: CP-FP | Phase: SEC-2012.4.3-1 | Award Amount: 5.48M | Year: 2013

This work will provide a monitoring system for constructed facilities that will provide a near real time, reliable, and continuously updated assessment of the structural condition of the monitored facilities after a disaster, with enough detail to be useful for early and full recovery planning. The above assessment will be seamlessly integrated with automated, near real-time and continuously updated assessment of physical damage, loss of functionality, direct economic loss and needs of the monitored facilities and will provide the required input for the prioritization of their repair. Such detailed monitoring is only economical for selected facilities that are essential for response and recovery or facilities that have a high value as a target for terrorist attacks. In case of spatially extended events, in order to assess the physical damage in the whole affected area, the detailed assessment of damage in the monitored facilities will be used for the speedy local calibration of satellite and oblique aerial photography dramatically reducing the required time to inform the post disaster/crisis needs assessment process and provide base data for reconstruction efforts. The above will be part of the RECONASS next generation post-crisis needs assessment tool in regards to construction damage and related needs. This tool will enable fusion of external information, allow for future expansion of the system, provide international interoperability between the involved units for reconstruction and recovery planning and support the collaborative work between these actors.


Evans B.A.,Anglia Ruskin University | Amyes S.G.B.,University of Edinburgh
Clinical Microbiology Reviews | Year: 2014

The OXA β-lactamases were among the earliest β-lactamases detected; however, these molecular class D β-lactamases were originally relatively rare and always plasmid mediated. They had a substrate profile limited to the penicillins, but some became able to confer resistance to cephalosporins. From the 1980s onwards, isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii that were resistant to the carbapenems emerged, manifested by plasmid-encoded β-lactamases (OXA-23, OXA-40, and OXA-58) categorized as OXA enzymes because of their sequence similarity to earlier OXA β-lactamases. It was soon found that every A. baumannii strain possessed a chromosomally encoded OXA β-lactamase (OXA-51-like), some of which could confer resistance to carbapenems when the genetic environment around the gene promoted its expression. Similarly, Acinetobacter species closely related to A. baumannii also possessed their own chromosomally encoded OXA β-lactamases; some could be transferred to A. baumannii, and they formed the basis of transferable carbapenem resistance in this species. In some cases, the carbapenem-resistant OXA β-lactamases (OXA-48) have migrated into the Enterobacteriaceae and are becoming a significant cause of carbapenem resistance. The emergence of OXA enzymes that can confer resistance to carbapenems, particularly in A. baumannii, has transformed these β-lactamases from a minor hindrance into a major problem set to demote the clinical efficacy of the carbapenems. © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: Innovate UK | Program: | Phase: Knowledge Transfer Partnership | Award Amount: 85.42K | Year: 2016

To develop an in-house capability in electronics design and embedded control systems through a robust series of prototype design and development, testing phases and commercialisation (including rapid business scaling).


Grant
Agency: GTR | Branch: AHRC | Program: | Phase: Research Grant | Award Amount: 121.14K | Year: 2016

Audio Description (AD) for film and television consists of a pre-recorded audio commentary that makes visual content accessible to visually impaired audiences by providing information that clarifies the narrative, such as descriptions on actions, gestures and places. Although, throughout the years, digital technologies have been used to improve the mode of delivery of AD, the notions behind its design have been mostly unchanged despite significant advancements in the field of digital sound production and postproduction. Furthermore, AD is a process separate from the creative production and only considered as an accessibility strategy. The Enhancing Audio Description project investigates how digital audio technologies can transform the design and implementation of AD for film, television and interactive media and as a result, change the ways in which visually impaired audiences experience audio-visual presentations. This research will pioneer novel sound design techniques based on new audio technologies that can be used to enhance AD, providing an audio track that is closer to the artists vision and that will bridge the gap between sighted and visually impaired audiences. Moreover, the project will enable researchers in the arts and humanities to improve the communication between audio-visual arts and visually impaired audiences and will drive the development of digital technologies and methods that can be used to improve audio-visual experiences for people with sight loss. The project will investigate ways in which AD can be updated through digital technologies to provide both an informative and entertaining experience, while also encouraging the use of the same soundtrack for both visually impaired and sighted audiences. Enhancing Audio Description explores two key methods: The first method investigates recent advancements in surround sound rendering and interactive media systems to create a more spatially accurate soundtrack, which includes an accurate rendition of the positions of characters and objects in space, types of shot, camera movements, camera angles and depth of frame; such a method will reduce the need for descriptions. The second method is the incorporation of first person narration as an alternative to the descriptive voice, to provide an AD that is better suited to the style of the visuals and could prove enjoyable for all audiences. Both methods would require the incorporation of AD to the creative process, transforming it from just an accessibility measure into part of the creative workflows. Whilst both methods are highly applicable to cinematic presentations, the research aims to generalise the approach so that visually impaired audiences can have enhanced soundtracks in a multitude of environments such as in museums, living rooms, or on personalised mobile media devices as well as in a myriad of applications such as film, television, gaming, therapy, training and other audio-visual activities which stimulate the UK digital economy. The proposers will therefore engage with key stakeholders from the film, television, interactive media industries and accessibility services to consider the practicalities of their implementation, including how they fit within current workflows. A significant outcome from the research will be in linking the new technological mechanisms for the enhancement of AD with the overall objective of inclusion in new media services for those with visual impairments.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-IF-EF-ST | Phase: MSCA-IF-2014-EF | Award Amount: 183.45K | Year: 2016

The question of which economic framework (or sets of frameworks) is (are) appropriate for providing policy prescriptions conducive to ecological sustainable has gained renewed interest within the community of ecological economists and political economists. To help answer this question I propose to investigate the suitability of four economic frameworks neoclassical environmental economics, non-Walrasian neoclassical environmental economics, institutional ecological economics, and ecological Marxian political economy, for providing effective and coherent policy prescriptions for renewable and sustainable energy resources, specifically for electricity generation. The inquiry will be both philosophical/methodological and empirical. The four frameworks will be interrogated against case studies of the UK, Germany, Norway, France, Canada, and the US. The case studies will be comprised of analyses of the socio-economic, historical, political, and cultural backdrop of energy resources in each country. The results of this interrogation will then be used to assess the suitability of the four frameworks for providing policy prescriptions conducive to ecological sustainability with regards to their respective methodologies including ontology, epistemology, methodology (to include methods as well), and ideology. The case for methodological pluralism will be assessed and a notion of pluralism developed for economic frameworks concerned with ecological sustainability. The benefits that will be gained from undertaking this research program at the ERA level will accrue to economists and social scientists first by giving them better analytical and conceptual tools, and all those, including policy makers, politicians, and business leaders who depend on those tools afterwards through better results.


Grant
Agency: European Commission | Branch: H2020 | Program: MSCA-IF-EF-ST | Phase: MSCA-IF-2015-EF | Award Amount: 195.45K | Year: 2016

The objective of this proposal, Reciprocal Encounters Young Adults Leaving Care, is not only to produce preventive, client-based social work guidelines regarding how to search for the best ways to support the well-being of young adults with substitute care experiences and the process of their deinstitutionalisation or leaving substitute care, but it will also use a complementary participatory research methodology to explore the research questions, undertaking research with young adults, not just on them, thus delivering user-driven results. The study searches for solutions to improve social work policypractice related to young adults participation, increase young adults awareness of the options to participate in welfare policy and social work policypractice making and how to strengthen the young adults capabilities to act in their communities and help them obtain new skills that will be useful, for instance, in their working lives. The objective of the proposal will be achieved through theory-building and methodological improvements concerning participatory research with young adults. The study is structured into two case studies with young adults who have left family or institutional care one in the United Kingdom and one in Finland representing different welfare states in Europe and their child welfare services. The data set for Finland already exists (n = 25), and a similar data set will be gathered for the UK (n = 25) following the same methods of participatory research as those used in Finland. For the researcher, this project offers an invaluable opportunity to expand her knowledge of theory-building regarding reciprocal participation and well-being, and to gain skills in public engagement and research communication. The project also gives her unique opportunities to grow her international collaboration network and new links with related European and global networks through complementary academic and non-academic secondment/placements.

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