Uniondale, NY, United States
Uniondale, NY, United States

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Patent
Angion Biomedica Corp | Date: 2014-09-23

The present invention provides compounds having the general structural formula (I) and pharmaceutically acceptable derivatives thereof, as described generally and in classes and subclasses herein, and additionally provides pharmaceutical compositions thereof, and methods for the use thereof for the treatment of any of a number of conditions or diseases involving fibrosis and proliferation, and where anti-fibrotic or anti-proliferative activity is beneficial.


Patent
Angion Biomedica Corp | Date: 2014-09-23

The present invention provides methods for treating polycystic kidney disease by administering a compound or pharmaceutical composition thereof having the general structural formula (I) and pharmaceutically acceptable derivatives thereof, as described generally and in classes and subclasses herein.


The present invention provides compositions and formulations of compounds having formula (I) and pharmaceutically acceptable derivatives thereof, wherein p, R^(1), R^(2 )and B are as described generally and in classes and subclasses herein, and additionally provides pharmaceutical compositions thereof, and methods for the use thereof for the treatment of any of a number of injuries, conditions or diseases in which HGF/SF or the activities thereof, or agonists or antagonists thereof have a therapeutically useful role. In addition, methods are provided for treating such diseases or diseases starting at a time after the onset of the injury, condition or disease.


Patent
Angion Biomedica Corp | Date: 2015-05-05

The present invention provides compounds having the general structural formula (I) and pharmaceutically acceptable derivatives thereof, as described generally and in classes and subclasses herein, and additionally provides pharmaceutical compositions thereof, and methods for the use thereof for the treatment of any of a number of conditions or diseases involving abnormal or excessive fibrosis.


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 769.98K | Year: 2014

? DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): The incidence and prevalence of both alcoholic and non-alcoholic liver diseases is increasing. The population presenting with Metabolic Syndrome, a key risk factor for NAFLD-NASH-liver fibrosis is ballooning. Leftuntreated, liver fibrosis can progress to cirrhosis or end-stage liver disease and even hepatocellular carcinoma. Today, therapeutic strategies are primarily geared toward mitigating NAFLD-NASH via diet modification, exercise and medication. Unfortunately, there is no approved therapy for established liver fibrosis other than organ transplantation. The proposed translational research program is designed to bring to clinical trials an outstanding and highly promising orally bioavailable small molecule antifibrotic to clinical trials for the treatment of liver fibrosis. Anion Biomedica has identified ANG3070, a potent, highly water-soluble, orally bioavailable, small molecule platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) and vascular endothelial growth fact


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: National Institutes of Health | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 610.94K | Year: 2016

DESCRIPTION provided by applicant The renin angiotensin aldosterone system RAAS plays a critical role in renal physiology Inhibitors of angiotensin converting enzyme ACE or angiotensin receptor blockers ARB are the mainstay in the clinical management of renal disorders such as chronic kidney disease CKD Despite initial success of ACE inhibition or ARB therapy patients often acquire resistance to RAAS inhibitors The clinical significance of the phenomenon of andquot aldosterone breakthroughandquot is increasingly recognized One approach to combat this breakthrough is to inhibit the enzyme responsible for aldosterone production aldosterone synthase Angion has identified a new proprietary non steroidal small molecule inhibitor of aldosterone synthase which shows anti fibrotic effects in preclinical in vivo models f CKD We propose to conduct preclinical development activities towards an IND track nomination of our lead compound for CKD PUBLIC HEALTH RELEVANCE The renin angiotensin aldosterone system RAAS plays a critical role in renal pathophysiology One approach to target this pathway is to inhibit aldosterone synthase the enzyme responsible for aldosterone production Angion has identified a new proprietary non steroidal small molecule inhibitor of aldosterone synthase which shows anti fibrotic effects in preclinical in vivo models of chronic kidney disease We propose to conduct preclinical development activities towards an IND track nomination of our lead compound for chronic kidney disease


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 224.35K | Year: 2014

DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Chronic Pancreatitis (CP) is characterized by continuous or recurrent inflammation of the pancreas that leads to permanent destruction of the pancreas resulting in exocrine and endocrine insufficiency. CP is a common disorder associated with significant morbidity and mortality with an incidence of 8.2 and a prevalence of 27.4 per 100 000 population. The etiology of CP is complex and about 70% of cases are due to excessive alcohol consumption. Alcoholic chronic pancreatitis is one of the more painful and serious consequences of alcohol, and the role of alcohol as a predisposing factor in severe pancreatitis is underappreciated. The most critical step for development of chronic pancreatitis is activation of pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) and increased extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition that leads to fibrosis. Several growth factors, cytokines and alcohol can induce PSCs activation. Pancreatic fibrosis is a constant histopathological feature of chronic pancreatitis


Grant
Agency: Department of Health and Human Services | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 299.95K | Year: 2014

DESCRIPTION (provided by applicant): Nuclear accidents and terrorism present a serious threat for causing mass-casualty scenarios. In radiation events, many people receive non-uniform whole-body or partial-body irradiation. The risk of exposure to ionizingradiation due to terrorist activities could result in acute injury as well as long-term adverse health effects in thousands of people. The lung is one of the more radiosensitive organs and inhaling large quantities of radionuclides produces a spectrum ofsevere functional and morphological changes, ranging from radiation pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis. Although efforts to find suitable radiation countermeasures were initiated more than 50 years ago, no safe and effective radiation countermeasure has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Thus, there is a pressing need for radiation countermeasures. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) is a paracrine growth factor produced by cells of mesenchymal origin; Activation of the HGF pathway is


Grant
Agency: National Science Foundation | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 149.76K | Year: 2014

This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase I project seeks to develop a new drug-delivery microscaffold that can help millions of patients suffering from chronic kidney, liver or lung disease. These diseases are characterized by chronic inflammation of the organ, stiffening or hardening of the organ and a gradual decline in organ function. The proposed microscaffold brings together on one single platform two drugs with very different actions. One drug is aspirin that reduces inflammation and the other drug is Relaxin which can soften hardened tissue and preserve tissue function. Unfortunately, Relaxin cannot be taken orally and is therefore not being used for these indications. This microscaffold, to be implanted under the skin, is designed to release these drugs continuously over several days or weeks. This Phase I program seeks to demonstrate the feasibility of such a concept in cell-based studies by demonstrating that this microscaffold releases both aspirin and Relaxin and that these two drugs retain their activities. The broader impact/commercial potential of this project is significant. These chronic diseases are currently without cure. In fact, chronic kidney disease, cirrhosis and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis all necessitate organ transplant. In addition to their attendant morbidity and mortality, these diseases cost this country billions of dollars in health care expenses and lost wages. The potential healthcare impact of this highly innovative technology is exceptionally broad. Sustained-release microscaffolds will enable less frequent dosing and translate to better patient compliance. In fact, similar to antibody-based therapies, this extended-release scaffold might necessitate administration only once monthly or even less frequently. By encapsulating a variety of highly potent drugs from insulin to growth factors, custom platforms can be designed to treat a host of indications such as diabetes, keloid scars and tissue fibrosis.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 149.76K | Year: 2014

This Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase I project seeks to develop a new drug-delivery microscaffold that can help millions of patients suffering from chronic kidney, liver or lung disease. These diseases are characterized by chronic inflammation of the organ, stiffening or hardening of the organ and a gradual decline in organ function. The proposed microscaffold brings together on one single platform two drugs with very different actions. One drug is aspirin that reduces inflammation and the other drug is Relaxin which can soften hardened tissue and preserve tissue function. Unfortunately, Relaxin cannot be taken orally and is therefore not being used for these indications. This microscaffold, to be implanted under the skin, is designed to release these drugs continuously over several days or weeks. This Phase I program seeks to demonstrate the feasibility of such a concept in cell-based studies by demonstrating that this microscaffold releases both aspirin and Relaxin and that these two drugs retain their activities.

The broader impact/commercial potential of this project is significant. These chronic diseases are currently without cure. In fact, chronic kidney disease, cirrhosis and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis all necessitate organ transplant. In addition to their attendant morbidity and mortality, these diseases cost this country billions of dollars in health care expenses and lost wages. The potential healthcare impact of this highly innovative technology is exceptionally broad. Sustained-release microscaffolds will enable less frequent dosing and translate to better patient compliance. In fact, similar to antibody-based therapies, this extended-release scaffold might necessitate administration only once monthly or even less frequently. By encapsulating a variety of highly potent drugs from insulin to growth factors, custom platforms can be designed to treat a host of indications such as diabetes, keloid scars and tissue fibrosis.

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