San Angelo, TX, United States
San Angelo, TX, United States

Angelo State University is a public, coeducational, doctoral level degree-granting university located in San Angelo, Texas, United States. It was founded in 1928 as San Angelo College. It gained University status and awarded its first baccalaureate degrees in 1967 and graduate degrees in 1969, the same year it took on its current name, Angelo State University. It offers over 100 undergraduate programs and 34 graduate programs. It is a member of the Texas Tech University System. Angelo State was named one of "The Best 378 Colleges" in 2013 by The Princeton Review. Only five public schools in the State of Texas were listed, the other four being Texas A&M University, the University of Houston, the University of Texas at Dallas, and the University of Texas at Austin. Additionally, it was one of the twenty-two institutions in Texas designated in its regional "Best in the West" rankings. Wikipedia.


Time filter

Source Type

News Article | May 3, 2017
Site: www.eurekalert.org

Climate plays a key role in determining what animals can live where. And while human-induced climate change has been causing major problems for wildlife as of late, changes in the Earth's climate have impacted evolution for millions of years--offering tantalizing clues into how to protect animals facing climate change today. In a new paper in Ecology and Evolution, scientists have delved into the effects of Ice Age climate change upon the evolution of tiny, hand-standing skunks. "By analyzing western spotted skunk DNA, we learned that Ice Age climate change played a crucial role in their evolution," says lead author Adam Ferguson, Collections Manager of Mammals at The Field Museum in Chicago and affiliate of Texas Tech University. "Over the past million years, changing climates isolated groups of spotted skunks in regions with suitable abiotic conditions, giving rise to genetic sub-divisions that we still see today." Western spotted skunks are really stinkin' cute-- at two pounds, they're smaller than the striped Pepe Le Pew variety, their coats are an almost maze-like pattern of black and white swirls, and when they spray, they often do a hand-stand, hind legs and fluffy tail in the air as they unleash smelly chemicals to ward off predators. They're found throughout the Western US and Mexico, in a wide variety of climates-- they thrive everywhere from Oregon's temperate rainforests to the Sonoran, the hottest desert in Mexico. There are three genetic sub-groups, called clades, of western spotted skunks. Often, clades develop when a species is split up by geography. If a species is separated by, say, a mountain range, the groups on either side of the mountain may wind up splitting off from each other genetically. However, the division of the skunks into three clades doesn't seem to have been driven solely by geographical barriers-- populations separated by mountains are more or less genetically identical. Instead, the skunks vary genetically from one historic climate region to another, due to Ice Age climate change. "Western spotted skunks have been around for a million years, since the Pleistocene Ice Age," explains Ferguson. "During the Ice Age, western North America was mostly covered by glaciers, and there were patches of suitable climates for the skunks separated by patches of unsuitable climates. These regions are called climate refugia. When we analyzed the DNA of spotted skunks living today, we found three groups that correspond to three different climate refugia." "That means that for spotted skunk evolution, climate change appears to have been a more important factor than geographical barriers," says Ferguson. In the study, scientists used DNA samples from 97 skunks from a variety of regions and climates in the American Southwest. Upon sequencing the DNA, the scientists were surprised to see that the skunks split into three clades based on pockets of suitable climate present during the Pleistocene. "Small carnivores like skunks haven't been well-studied when it comes to historical climate change," says Ferguson. "We know how small mammals like rodents respond to changing climates, and we know how bigger carnivores like wolves respond, but this study helps bridge the gap between them." Ferguson also notes that skunks don't deserve the bad rap they get. "Skunks are a really interesting family of North American carnivores-- they're well-known, but not well-studied. And studying them comes with a cost-- they stink, even their tissues stink, and you run the risk of getting sprayed. But they're important to their ecosystems-- for example, they eat insects and rodents that damage our crops," he says. Moreover, Ferguson says, the study can illuminate the bigger picture of biodiversity in the face of climate change-- an issue that grows increasingly relevant as human-driven climate change affects more and more of the world's animals. "What we know about the past can inform what we expect to see in the future," says Ferguson. "Understanding these genetic subdivisions that happened as a result of changing climatic conditions can help us conserve skunks and other animals in the future." Before working at The Field Museum, Adam Ferguson was affiliated with Texas Tech University and completed this research there. Ferguson's co-authors are affiliated with Angelo State University, the National Museum of Natural History, the National Zoological Park, the US Fish and Wildlife Service, and the University of New Mexico.


"By analyzing western spotted skunk DNA, we learned that Ice Age climate change played a crucial role in their evolution," says lead author Adam Ferguson, Collections Manager of Mammals at The Field Museum in Chicago and affiliate of Texas Tech University. "Over the past million years, changing climates isolated groups of spotted skunks in regions with suitable abiotic conditions, giving rise to genetic sub-divisions that we still see today." Western spotted skunks are really stinkin' cute— at two pounds, they're smaller than the striped Pepe Le Pew variety, their coats are an almost maze-like pattern of black and white swirls, and when they spray, they often do a hand-stand, hind legs and fluffy tail in the air as they unleash smelly chemicals to ward off predators. They're found throughout the Western US and Mexico, in a wide variety of climates— they thrive everywhere from Oregon's temperate rainforests to the Sonoran, the hottest desert in Mexico. There are three genetic sub-groups, called clades, of western spotted skunks. Often, clades develop when a species is split up by geography. If a species is separated by, say, a mountain range, the groups on either side of the mountain may wind up splitting off from each other genetically. However, the division of the skunks into three clades doesn't seem to have been driven solely by geographical barriers— populations separated by mountains are more or less genetically identical. Instead, the skunks vary genetically from one historic climate region to another, due to Ice Age climate change. "Western spotted skunks have been around for a million years, since the Pleistocene Ice Age," explains Ferguson. "During the Ice Age, western North America was mostly covered by glaciers, and there were patches of suitable climates for the skunks separated by patches of unsuitable climates. These regions are called climate refugia. When we analyzed the DNA of spotted skunks living today, we found three groups that correspond to three different climate refugia." "That means that for spotted skunk evolution, climate change appears to have been a more important factor than geographical barriers," says Ferguson. In the study, scientists used DNA samples from 97 skunks from a variety of regions and climates in the American Southwest. Upon sequencing the DNA, the scientists were surprised to see that the skunks split into three clades based on pockets of suitable climate present during the Pleistocene. "Small carnivores like skunks haven't been well-studied when it comes to historical climate change," says Ferguson. "We know how small mammals like rodents respond to changing climates, and we know how bigger carnivores like wolves respond, but this study helps bridge the gap between them." Ferguson also notes that skunks don't deserve the bad rap they get. "Skunks are a really interesting family of North American carnivores— they're well-known, but not well-studied. And studying them comes with a cost— they stink, even their tissues stink, and you run the risk of getting sprayed. But they're important to their ecosystems— for example, they eat insects and rodents that damage our crops," he says. Moreover, Ferguson says, the study can illuminate the bigger picture of biodiversity in the face of climate change— an issue that grows increasingly relevant as human-driven climate change affects more and more of the world's animals. "What we know about the past can inform what we expect to see in the future," says Ferguson. "Understanding these genetic subdivisions that happened as a result of changing climatic conditions can help us conserve skunks and other animals in the future." Before working at The Field Museum, Adam Ferguson was affiliated with Texas Tech University and completed this research there. Ferguson's co-authors are affiliated with Angelo State University, the National Museum of Natural History, the National Zoological Park, the US Fish and Wildlife Service, and the University of New Mexico. Explore further: Study finds climate, landscape changes may lead to more rabid skunks


News Article | February 15, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

The Community for Accredited Online Schools, a leading resource provider for higher education information, has released its list of the Best Online Colleges in Texas for 2017. Highlighting both two- and four-year schools, more than 90 Texas colleges received accolades, with the University of Texas at Austin, Texas A&M University, University of North Texas, Texas Tech University and Baylor University coming in as the top four-year schools and St. Philip’s College, Odessa College, Del Mar College, Western Texas College and Texas State Technical College Waco ranking highest among two-year schools. “About 1.5 million students enrolled in post-secondary education in Texas in fall 2016,” said Doug Jones, CEO and founder of AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org. “As Internet-based coursework becomes more accessible, students may find that online programs suit their needs better. Schools on our list have been ranked for overall quality, providing excellent options for anyone who wants more flexible education options.” To determine the Best Online Schools in Texas, each college in the state was evaluated using over a dozen unique data points to find which schools best meet students’ needs, including graduation rates, career placement services and financial aid availability. AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org also requires each school highlighted on the lists to carry institutional accreditation and hold public or private not-for-profit status. Find each school’s score and ranking or read more about the data and methodology used to determine the lists here: The Best Four-Year Online Schools in Texas for 2017 include the following: Abilene Christian University Angelo State University Baylor University Concordia University-Texas Dallas Baptist University Dallas Christian College Grace School of Theology Houston Baptist University Howard Payne University Lamar University LeTourneau University Lubbock Christian University Messenger College Midwestern State University Our Lady of the Lake University Prairie View A & M University Sam Houston State University Schreiner University Southern Methodist University Southwestern Adventist University Southwestern Assemblies of God University St Mary's University Stephen F Austin State University Sul Ross State University Tarleton State University Texas A & M International University Texas A & M University-College Station Texas A & M University-Commerce Texas A & M University-Corpus Christi Texas A & M University-Kingsville Texas A & M University-Texarkana Texas Christian University Texas Southern University Texas State University Texas Tech University Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center Texas Woman's University The University of Texas at Arlington The University of Texas at Austin The University of Texas at Dallas The University of Texas at El Paso The University of Texas at Tyler The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio The University of Texas of the Permian Basin The University of Texas Rio Grande Valley Trinity University University of Dallas University of Houston University of Houston-Clear Lake The Best Two-Year Online Schools in Texas for 2017 include the following: Alvin Community College Amarillo College Austin Community College District Central Texas College College of the Mainland Collin College Del Mar College El Paso Community College Frank Phillips College Grayson College Houston Community College Kilgore College Lamar Institute of Technology Lamar State College-Port Arthur Lone Star College Navarro College North Central Texas College Northwest Vista College Odessa College Palo Alto College Panola College San Antonio College South Plains College St Philip's College Tarrant County College District Temple College Texas State Technical College - West Texas Texas State Technical College-Waco Trinity Valley Community College Tyler Junior College Western Texas College ### About Us: AccreditedSchoolsOnline.org was founded in 2011 to provide students and parents with quality data and information about pursuing an affordable, quality education that has been certified by an accrediting agency. Our community resource materials and tools span topics such as college accreditation, financial aid, opportunities available to veterans, people with disabilities, as well as online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning programs that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational success. environments that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational and career success.


News Article | October 29, 2016
Site: www.prweb.com

The 2016 ranking of the Best Online Colleges in Texas has been released by leading higher education and online student resource provider, AffordableCollegesOnline.org. Four-year colleges earning the highest marks include the University of Texas of the Permian Basin, the University of Texas, Victoria, and Southwestern Adventist University. Frank Phillips College, Western Texas College and Odessa College received top honors for two-year colleges. Between the two lists, more than 70 colleges in Texas were recognized for their variety of online education options and their strong focus on affordability. "The number of Texans earning college degrees has increased dramatically over the past five years,” said Dan Schuessler, CEO and Founder of AffordableCollegesOnline.org. "We’ve found the schools in Texas who are designing learning options to be more flexible and accessible than ever before, for both in-state students and learners located across the nation.” To earn a place on AffordableCollegesOnline.org’s list, schools are required to meet certain baseline criteria. Colleges must be accredited, public or private not-for-profit institutions. Schools had to also meet baseline affordability standards, offering in-state tuition for under $5,000 per year at two year schools and under $25,000 per year at four year schools. Each college’s ranking is determined by an in-depth analysis of more than a dozen different metrics, ranging from financial aid options to graduation rate to online program variety. The full list of colleges is included below. To see where each ranks specifically and to get more specific details about the methodology used to compare each college, visit the following page: The Best Two-Year Online Colleges in Texas for 2016: Alvin Community College Amarillo College Central Texas College College of the Mainland Collin College Del Mar College El Paso Community College Frank Phillips College Grayson College Houston Community College Kilgore College Lamar Institute of Technology Lone Star College Navarro College North Central Texas College Odessa College Panola College South Plains College Tarrant County College District Temple College Texas State Technical College - Waco Trinity Valley Community College Tyler Junior College Western Texas College The Best Four-Year Online Colleges in Texas for 2016: Amberton University Angelo State University Arlington Baptist College Dallas Baptist University Dallas Christian College Grace School of Theology King's University Lamar University Lubbock Christian University Messenger College Midwestern State University Our Lady of the Lake University Parker University Prairie View A & M University Sam Houston State University South Texas College Southwestern Adventist University Southwestern Assemblies of God University Southwestern Christian College Stephen F. Austin State University Sul Ross State University Tarleton State University Texas A & M University - Central Texas Texas A & M University - College Station Texas A & M University - Commerce Texas A & M University - Corpus Christi Texas A & M University - Kingsville Texas A & M University - Texarkana Texas Tech University Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center Texas Woman's University The University of Texas at Arlington The University of Texas at Brownsville The University of Texas at El Paso The University of Texas at Tyler The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center The University of Texas Medical Branch The University of Texas of the Permian Basin University of Houston - Clear Lake University of Houston - Downtown University of Houston - Victoria University of North Texas University of North Texas at Dallas Wayland Baptist University West Texas A & M University AffordableCollegesOnline.org began in 2011 to provide quality data and information about pursuing an affordable higher education. Our free community resource materials and tools span topics such as financial aid and college savings, opportunities for veterans and people with disabilities, and online learning resources. We feature higher education institutions that have developed online learning environments that include highly trained faculty, new technology and resources, and online support services to help students achieve educational and career success. We have been featured by nearly 1,100 postsecondary institutions and nearly 120 government organizations.


News Article | February 23, 2017
Site: www.prweb.com

Texas Beef Council announces the top Semifinalists who will move on to compete in the Beef Loving Texans’ Best Butcher in Texas regional competition. The challenge, which pits butchers from across Texas against each other for the chance to win cash prizes and the esteemed title of Beef Loving Texans’ Best Butcher in Texas, has brought some of the state’s most talented butchers together – representing an art form that has been important to Texas’ cultural heritage. Regional semifinal rounds will be held throughout the state in Houston on March 4, Dallas on March 18 and San Antonio on April 1. In each city, Semifinalists will partake in a three-part challenge, which tests competitors’ on cut identification, along with their skills to cut to order and cut beef for retail merchandising. Each competitor will be equipped with Victorinox Swiss Army boning knives, a breaking knife, a cut resistant glove, a steel and a knife roll, to ensure everyone starts on an even playing field. Competitors will receive top marks based on their technique, creativity, presentation and consumer interaction. With culinary influencer/personality Jess Pryles emceeing, top industry professionals and culinary experts will weigh in in each region to determine the top three competitors who will move on to the final round at the Austin Food + Wine Festival on April 29. Additionally, the beef cuts yielded from each round will be donated to local food banks and their partner agencies, to provide meals for those in need. “We’re anxious and excited to see how the competition unfolds over the next couple of months, and look forward to meeting many of the valued professionals working to bring back the art of this meaningful craft,” said Linda Bebee, vice president, domestic marketing for Texas Beef Council. “We wish all of our Semifinalists the best of luck as they move on to compete throughout our great state in the first Beef Loving Texans’ Best Butcher in Texas competition.” Semifinalists are as follows: Eddie Behrends, Angelo State University Bryan Butler, Salt & Time Butcher Shop Vincent Cruz, Costco Wholesale Mark DeWitt, H-E-B Hunter Dieringer, H-E-B Eric Fuller, United Supermarkets Shawn Knowles, Old Town Market Jordan Kyle, H-E-BMichael Majkszak, Majkszak Meat Market Evelio Morales Jr., Casino Grocery & Market JoeNathan Muras, Lone Star Provisions Matt Peterson, Matador Meat & Wine Adam Stone, Local Yocal Farm-to-Market Hector White, Eastside Choice Meats In each regional semifinal city, Texas Beef Council has partnered with culinary schools to host the events, including The Art Institute of Houston, El Centro College in Dallas and St. Philip’s College in San Antonio. Additionally, the beef cuts yielded from each round will be donated to local food banks and their partner agencies, to provide meals for those in need. The three winners from each regional competition will come out on top as Finalists, return home with a $2,500 cash prize and a seat on the Beef Loving Texans’ Best Butcher Council. During the Austin Food + Wine Festival on April 29, Finalists will compete for the bragging rights of being crowned the rarest in all the land. The Best Butcher in Texas will receive an additional $5,000 grand prize, a knife set courtesy of Victorinox Swiss Army from their Fibrox Pro Cutlery line as well as inclusion in a one full-page co-branded ad in Texas Monthly. Created to celebrate Texans’ pride in tradition, Beef Loving Texans’ Best Butcher in Texas competition will allow the best of the best butchers to showcase their skills. In line with Beef Loving Texans’ value of tradition, the competition will also explore the different aspects of beef butchery that remain a key element in Texas’ cultural heritage. For more information, visit BeefLovingTexans.com/best-butcher-in-texas/. About Beef Loving Texans Beef Loving Texans is Texas Beef Council’s consumer brand created to share unique recipes, stories, cooking and shopping tips and expert nutrition information. The Beef Loving Texans brand celebrates the pride and values deeply rooted in Texans through family, community and tradition. More information on the mission of Beef Loving Texans can be found at BeefLovingTexans.com. About Texas Beef Council The Texas Beef Council(TBC) conducts the $1 per head national checkoff program for Texas beef producers and is also the contractor for the Beef Promotion Research Council of Texas (BPRCT), which administers the $1 per head Texas state checkoff program. TBC’s mission is to increase beef demand in the state through programs of beef promotion, research and education. TBC also helps fund national and international beef checkoff programs to increase marketing opportunities around the globe. The BPRCT’s mission is to improve Texas producer profitability by strengthening and expanding beef demand. The TBC and the BPRCT are directed by a 20-member board of cattlemen and women representing the state’s beef producers.


Sarac B.,Yale University | Ketkaew J.,Chulalongkorn University | Popnoe D.O.,Angelo State University | Schroers J.,Yale University
Advanced Functional Materials | Year: 2012

A combination of lithography and thermoplastic forming allows us to fabricate honeycombs from bulk metallic glass (BMG) precisely and to manipulate its structure selectively. Characteristics of the honeycomb such as the ligament length, thickness, and radius of curvature at the joints of the cells are varied to determine how changes in these characteristics affect properties under uniaxial in-plane compression testing. It is found that the deformation behavior of BMG honeycombs can be controlled through microstructural design, from brittle to ductile, by changing the length to thickness ratio of the ligaments. The ability to absorb energy of BMG honeycombs exceeds honeycombs of most other materials due to the utilization of a size effect, which result in plasticity. Besides the usage for BMG honeycombs, the technique provides a general method to effectively characterize complex microstructural architectures and tailoring these architectures to the specifications of the material used. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 118.59K | Year: 2012

To increase the number of faculty teaching cybersecurity content, the Department of Computer Science and the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Texas Tech University in partnership with the Center of Security Studies and Criminal Justice at Angelo State University are offering a professional development program in cybersecurity to community college faculty scholars across West Texas. Thirty faculty scholars from community and private colleges across West Texas are participating in a cyber-security education workshop and are mentored in the establishment of cybersecurity associate degrees and certification programs in their home institutions. The project provides a holistic approach to cybersecurity education by integrating the science and engineering aspects of cybersecurity issues with the management, ethical, and practical aspects as they relate to national defense and homeland security. It also introduces recent advances in cybersecurity research to improve cyber security education and explores various technical research and educational challenges. The project is increasing the number of educators knowledgeable in cybersecurity, resulting in a multiplying effect to students including minority groups that contribute to the workforce in the region.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Standard Grant | Program: | Phase: | Award Amount: 164.84K | Year: 2011

With the Pathways for Inspiring, Educating, and Recruiting West Texans in the Geosciences (PIER) program, Angelo State University (ASU) is working to increase the participation of mostly Hispanic students in geoscience education and career pathways, through aligned programs of student recruitment and teacher professional development for grade 6-12 science teachers affiliated with the San Angelo Independent School District (SAISD). PIER has two specific goals. The first goal of introducing at least 500 students in grades 6-12 to careers in the geosciences, and providing a pathway for students to study geoscience, is being achieved through: creation of school-year geoscience outreach events; design and implementation of geoscience content modules for presentation in middle school and high school classrooms by ASU students, faculty, and informal educators; and, recruitment of students from West Texas to major in geoscience or minor in Earth Science at ASU and encourage their persistence to graduation. The second goal of educating and inspiring at least 40 teachers in geoscience content areas aligned with the grade-appropriate Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (state standards) is being achieved through: design, implementation, and evaluation of project-based working sessions offered through summer teacher institutes; and, sustaining professional development support throughout the academic year.


Grant
Agency: NSF | Branch: Continuing grant | Program: | Phase: BIOLOGICAL RESEARCH COLLECTION | Award Amount: 480.87K | Year: 2012

The Angelo State Natural History Collections (ASNHC) house 120,000 voucher specimens of plants, mammals, birds, reptiles and amphibians of the Concho Valley, other regions of Texas, the U.S. and the world. The primary goal of this project is to improve researcher and educator access to the specimens and tissues housed in the Collections. The data associated with these specimens and digital images of plant specimens will be made available to researchers around the world. Faculty curators and students will complete data entry, including geo-referencing specimens, update software, and make all data available through existing biodiversity portals. Specific web-based learning modules for K-12 and university level students will be created. Holding facilities will be modernized and integrated pest management systems will be updated to protect specimens.

The broader impacts of this project are diverse. The wider science community will have improved access to ASNHC databases, increasing use of the Collections. K-12 science education throughout the region will benefit from new outreach resources (e.g. digital images) for teachers and students. Angelo State University students, including their own Hispanic Serving Institution target group, will benefit from improved specimen-based instructional resources for classroom and laboratory instruction.


News Article | October 27, 2015
Site: phys.org

Monica Ebert, newly named wool lab manager-research associate at Montana State University at Bozeman and recent graduate student at Angelo State University, has been completing graduate work with Texas A&M University and the Bill Sims Wool and Mohair Research Lab located on the center's grounds. "The focus of my research work has been wool product development with an emphasis on activewear apparel," said the Kansas native. Activewear to most folks in Texas means light comfortable clothing for sports, exercise and outdoor activities during hot weather, just the opposite image of what most people picture wool clothing to be, Ebert said. "Activewear is a new and emerging market that wool is entering," she said. "Typically, you wouldn't think of workout clothes as being made out of wool, but in fact, the fiber qualities of wool are exactly what you want. They work with your body to wick moisture away to keep you cool while you are working out and just overall keep you more comfortable when the proper wool is used." "The proper wool," Ebert explained, is the key. All the individual fiber diameters must measure less than 20 microns, with 18-19 microns even better. In the U.S., most of that top- quality wool is shorn from Rambouillet sheep. "Thirty micron wool is itchy," she said. "They are coarser wools that really should be used in carpet, not garments. With the rise of synthetics, we've really seen our industry straighten up in the type of wool being put into apparel products. It's that high-quality wool you want next to your skin. "My research is to help ensure the industry is getting the right wool put into the right garments so consumers are happy with their apparel. Aside from the comfort factor, the proper wool results in a very lightweight garment which is perfect for summer and winter too. Wool is perfect for keeping you cool in the summertime and warm in the winter." As a luxury fiber, Ebert said top-quality wool garments are expensive, but they will last a very long time and offer excellent durability when compared to practically any other fiber. The trick though is to buy items that don't soon go out of style, she said. "Many things go in and out of fashion," she said. "There are trends; you see clothes coming off of the fashion runways in the spring and fall. So many companies are having mid-season collections that you almost expect your favorite stores in the mall to have new clothes every month. So trends are constantly changing. "The nice thing about wool though is that when you spend that much money on apparel you typically want it to last a long time, so you want to buy more classic timeless pieces. Pick a style which won't necessarily go out of style." Even though Ebert's work was conducted in the heart of the sheep country, she said you'd be hard-pressed to find any wool sportswear at your local sporting goods store. "Many people believe wool is only for colder climates, so stores here aren't wanting to stock that high-end apparel for fear of having to mark it down if it doesn't sell. So to find it, I go online. "When you buy online, it's easy; you don't even have to drive to town. And it's convenient, especially when you can turn around and ship an item back for free if there's an issue. "Buying online also makes it easier for me to look at the garment's fiber content. To shop, I type 'wool' in as a search term and look up what wool products a particular retailer has to offer and choose from them." But with Ebert's research focused on athletic attire made in the U.S., she wants consumers to think about soft, supple running shorts and T-shirts, items even a seasoned wool garment shopper might not know existed. "We had garments made and fabric tests done, and everything we thought about wool, its breathability, durability; all of our fabric and garment tests came back to prove it had all that and more," she said. "The garments also have excellent insulation values while still being permeable, meaning they're breathable, exactly what you would want in activewear apparel. Oh, and there wasn't a scratchy thread in the entire lot." Explore further: Chemistry makes the natural 'wonder fabric' -- wool -- more wonderful

Loading Angelo State University collaborators
Loading Angelo State University collaborators