Entity

Time filter

Source Type


Boskovic J.,University of Zagreb | Leppee M.,Andrija Stampar Institute of Public Health | Culig J.,Josip Juraj Strossmayer University of Osijek | Eric M.,University of Novi Sad
Scandinavian Journal of Public Health | Year: 2013

Aims: The aims of this study was to determine adherence to chronic disease medication measured by self-reported questionnaire. Methods: The survey was conducted at 106 Zagreb pharmacies, and the questionnaire was filled out by the study subjects. Results: A total 1,357 diagnoses were reported by survey respondents (i.e., an average of 2.1 diagnoses per respondent). The most common diagnoses were diseases of the circulatory system (n = 500; 36.8%). The great majority of study subjects reported forgetfulness ('I just forgot') as the main reason for skipping drug doses. Conclusions: Among the many reasons people give for not adhering to drug treatment, forgetfulness was the most common. Common barriers to adherence are under the patient's control, so that attention to them is a necessary and important step in improving adherence. The existence of more than one cause of risk considerably increases the non-adherence risk of a patient. © 2013 the Nordic Societies of Public Health.


Leppee M.,Andrija Stampar Institute of Public Health | Boskovic J.,University of Zagreb | Culig J.,Andrija Stampar Institute of Public Health | Culig J.,Josip Juraj Strossmayer University of Osijek | Eric M.,University of Novi Sad
Current Medical Research and Opinion | Year: 2012

Medication possession ratio (MPR) was introduced as a uniform methodology for estimating medication adherence from pharmacy claims data, but it does not provide accurate information on the continuity of medication usage and the measurement of medication persistency and identification of eventual gaps in medication supply. The combination of an MPR and a persistency metric could provide timely information on the dynamics of patient medication adherence. © 2012 Informa UK Ltd All rights reserved: reproduction in whole or part not permitted.


Leppee M.,Andrija Stampar Institute of Public Health | Culig J.,Andrija Stampar Institute of Public Health | Culig J.,Josip Juraj Strossmayer University of Osijek | Eric M.,University of Novi Sad | And 2 more authors.
Biopolymers and Cell | Year: 2010

Aim. To assess the use of vitamin, mineral and iron supplements during pregnancy in Zagreb and Novi Sad. Methods. The study was conducted by use of a structured standardized questionnaire consisting of two parts, i. e. data obtained by maternal interview and hospital records. It is designed as a cross-sectional study in two countries (Croatia and Serbia). The study included 893 pregnant women from Zagreb and 6099 pregnant women from Novi Sad. Results. In Zagreb, pregnant women reported highest utilization of vi- tamin-mineral supplements (n = 508; 56.9%), whereas in Novi Sad these supplements ranked third (n = 408; 20.3%), following tocolytics and iron supplements. There was no statistically significant difference in the prevalence of congenital malformations between neonates at in utero exposure to vitamins, minerals and iron supplements and those without such exposure in either Zagreb or Novi Sad arm, with the exception of iron and calcium supplementation in the Zagreb arm. Conclusions. In spite of certain study limitations, the results obtained pointed to the unreasonable and potentially harmful use of these supplements in pregnant women from Zagreb. © Institute of Molecular Biology and Genetics NAS of Ukraine, 2010.


Tumir H.,Agency for Medicinal Products and Medical Devices | Bosnir J.,Andrija Stampar Institute of Public Health | Vedrina-Dragojevic I.,University of Zagreb | Dragun Z.,Ruder Boskovic Institute | And 2 more authors.
Homeopathy | Year: 2010

Background: Due to their popularity as a complementary therapy in many diseases, homeopathic products of animal, vegetable, mineral and chemical origin should be tested for the presence of contaminants to prevent eventual toxic effects. Objective: Thirty samples of homeopathic products were analyzed to estimate possible contamination with potentially toxic elements: Pb, Cd, As, Hg, Cr, Ni and Zn, and to assess human exposure to these metals/metalloid as a consequence of their consumption. Methods: Atomic absorption spectrometry was used to determine metal and metalloid concentrations. Results: Most tested products had very low metal/metalloid levels (below the limit of quantification of the method), but the metal/metalloid levels in the remaining products were in the following ranges (in μgg-1): Pb 0.33-1.29 (6 samples), Cd 2.78 (1 sample), As 0.22 (1 sample), Hg 0.02-0.12 (24 samples), Cr 0.40-10.27 (10 samples), Ni 0.43-55.00 (19 samples), and Zn 2.20-27.80 (11 samples). In the absence of regulatory standards for homeopathic products, the obtained results were compared to maximum allowable levels (MALs) as proposed by USP Ad Hoc Advisory Panel. Some analyzed preparations had metal levels above MALs (Pb: 2 samples; Cd: 1 sample; Ni: 2 samples). However, estimated cumulative daily intakes from tested homeopathic products were in all cases lower than permitted daily exposures for all dosage forms. Conclusion: The risk of bioaccumulation of metals/metalloid from the homeopathic medicines seems to be rather low, due to small quantities of those products prescribed to be applied per day, as well as insignificant metal contamination of the majority of tested products. However, the fact that particular formulations were contaminated by metals above MALs indicates potential risk and points to the necessity of regular monitoring of homeopathic products for metal contamination, due to their frequent and mostly unsupervised use. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.


Tumir H.,Agency for Medicinal Products and Medical Devices | Bosnir J.,Andrija Stampar Institute of Public Health | Vedrina-Dragojevic I.,University of Zagreb | Dragun Z.,Ruder Boskovic Institute | And 3 more authors.
Food Control | Year: 2010

Thirty samples of widely used vitamins and herbal preparations distributed on the Croatian market were analyzed by atomic absorption spectrometry in order to estimate contamination with Pb, Cd, As, Hg, Cr, Ni and Zn due to their potential toxicity if present above the maximum allowable levels (MAL). The following concentration ranges were obtained (in μg g-1): Pb 0.25-3.86; Cd 0.05-0.28; As 0.10-0.19; Hg 0.02-0.12; Cr 0.11-64.38; Ni 0.24-338.90; and Zn 1.00-95.3. Several analyzed formulations had metal levels above the maximum allowable limits (Pb: one honey-based product and one medicinal herb-based product; Cr: one product containing vitamins; Ni: two products containing vitamins and one product of animal origin). Moreover, the estimated cumulative daily intakes of several metals from some dietary supplements were higher than the oral permitted daily exposures set by the USP Advisory Panel on metal impurities (Pb: one medicinal herb-based product; Ni: one product containing minerals and one product of animal origin). Such formulations present a significant additional source of metals in the human diet, and therefore could be harmful for human health. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Discover hidden collaborations