Anderson Moores Veterinary Specialists

Winchester Hampshire, United Kingdom

Anderson Moores Veterinary Specialists

Winchester Hampshire, United Kingdom
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PubMed | Animal Health Trust, Couto Veterinary Consultants, Bridge Pathology, Lane College and 5 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: The Veterinary record | Year: 2015

To describe the signalment, clinicopathological findings and outcome in dogs presenting with acute kidney injury (AKI) and skin lesions between November 2012 and March 2014, in whom cutaneous and renal glomerular vasculopathy (CRGV) was suspected and renal thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) was histopathologically confirmed. The medical records of dogs with skin lesions and AKI, with histopathologically confirmed renal TMA, were retrospectively reviewed. Thirty dogs from across the UK were identified with clinicopathological findings compatible with CRGV. These findings included the following: skin lesions, predominantly affecting the distal extremities; AKI; and variably, anaemia, thrombocytopaenia and hyperbilirubinaemia. Known causes of AKI were excluded. The major renal histopathological finding was TMA. All thirty dogs died or were euthanised. Shiga toxin was not identified in the kidneys of affected dogs. Escherichia coli genes encoding shiga toxin were not identified in faeces from affected dogs. CRGV has previously been reported in greyhounds in the USA, a greyhound in the UK, without renal involvement, and a Great Dane in Germany. This is the first report of a series of non-greyhound dogs with CRGV and AKI in the UK. CRGV is a disease of unknown aetiology carrying a poor prognosis when azotaemia develops.


Dunn A.L.,Small Animal Specialist Hospital | Buffa E.A.,Small Animal Specialist Hospital | Marchevsky A.M.,Small Animal Specialist Hospital | Heller J.,Charles Sturt University | And 2 more authors.
Veterinary and Comparative Orthopaedics and Traumatology | Year: 2012

Objectives: To determine inter- and intra-operator variability associated with extracap-sular suture tensioning as performed during lateral fabello-tibial suture placement. Study design: Ex vivo study. Methods: Fifteen Greyhound cadaveric pelvic limbs were prepared by cutting the cranial cruciate ligament and placing an extracapsular fa-bello-tibial suture. On two occasions, three surgeons tensioned the extracapsular suture of each stifle. Stifles were returned to 135 degrees of flexion and the suture tension was measured using a commercially available suture ten-sioner with inbuilt tensiometer. Statistical analysis: Intra-operator and inter-operator agreement were assessed using the limits of agreement method. A linear mixed effects model was specified to assess the effect of operator, repeated estimates and stifle order on tension applied. Results: The mean difference within the three operators ranged from 0 to 14.7N. With 95% limits of agreement, on most occasions for all three operators, the difference was between -31.7 and 41.0 N. The mean difference between the three operators ranged from 6.0 to 30.7 N. With 95% limits of agreement, on most occasions the difference between operators was between -25.6 and 62.5 N. Clinical significance: Marked variation exists in the tension applied during fabello-tibial suture application, both within and between surgeons. This variation may lead to inconsistent clinical outcomes. Further studies are required to determine the clinical consequences of this marked variation in extra-capsular suture tensioning. © Schattauer 2012.


PubMed | RVC, University of Pennsylvania, University of Edinburgh, Royal Veterinary College and 7 more.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of veterinary internal medicine | Year: 2015

Outcome prediction in dogs with immune-mediated hemolytic anemia (IMHA) is challenging and few prognostic indicators have been consistently identified.An online case registry was initiated to: prospectively survey canine IMHA presentation and management in the British Isles; evaluate 2 previously reported illness severity scores, Canine Hemolytic Anemia Score (CHAOS) and Tokyo and to identify independent prognostic markers.Data from 276 dogs with primary IMHA across 10 referral centers were collected between 2008 and 2012.Outcome prediction by previously reported illness-severity scores was tested using univariate logistic regression. Independent predictors of death in hospital or by 30-days after admission were identified using multivariable logistic regression.Purebreds represented 89.1% dogs (n = 246). Immunosuppressive medications were administered to 88.4% dogs (n = 244), 76.1% (n = 210) received antithrombotics and 74.3% (n = 205) received packed red blood cells. Seventy-four per cent of dogs (n = 205) were discharged from hospital and 67.7% (n = 187) were alive 30-days after admission. Two dogs were lost to follow-up at 30-days. In univariate analyses CHAOS was associated with death in hospital and death within 30-days. Tokyo score was not associated with either outcome measure. A model containing SIRS-classification, ASA classification, ALT, bilirubin, urea and creatinine predicting outcome at discharge was accurate in 82% of cases. ASA classification, bilirubin, urea and creatinine were independently associated with death in hospital or by 30-days.Markers of kidney function, bilirubin concentration and ASA classification are independently associated with outcome in dogs with IMHA. Validation of this score in an unrelated population is now warranted.


Augusto M.,Anderson Moores Veterinary Specialists | Burden A.,Sheffield Hallam University | Neiger R.,Veterinarmedizinische Fakultat | Ramsey I.,University of Glasgow
Tierarztliche Praxis Ausgabe K: Kleintiere - Heimtiere | Year: 2012

Objective: This retrospective study describes the use of trilostane given once versus twice daily in dogs with hyperadrenocorticism (SID vs. BIDgroup) in separate clinical trials. Material and methods: The groups were compared over a six month period using laboratory findings, dose required to suppress post-ACTH cortisol, and clinical scores from owner and clinician questionnaires. Results: Ninety-three dogs enrolled the trials but for analysis of the final visit results only 56 dogs filled the inclusion criteria: 30 dogs in the SID-group and 26 dogs in the BID-group. Both treatment groups showed an improvement in clinical scores with time and no significant difference between them. In the BID-group post-ACTH cortisol concentrations went below 250 nmol/l sooner and in a higher proportion of dogs than in the SID-group. Twice-daily administration of trilostane also achieved a faster and more effective control for comparable daily doses. A higher individual tolerability (based on clinical scores) was found in the SID-group but there were no supporting laboratory findings. No dogs developed serious side-effects. Conclusion: This study reveals only small practical differences between once and twice daily trilostane administrations in treating hyperadrenocorticism. And the overall benefits of twice daily dosing have to be considered against the effect on the owners and their compliance with treatment. © Schattauer 2012.


PubMed | Fitzpatrick Referrals, Anderson Moores Veterinary Specialists, The Queen Mother Hospital for Animals and The Small Animal Specialist Hospital
Type: Journal Article | Journal: The Journal of small animal practice | Year: 2016

Limited guidelines exist regarding the optimal treatment of traumatic canine elbow luxation, and there is a lack of information on long-term functional outcome. Here we report reduction and stabilisation techniques for a series of traumatic elbow luxations and describe clinical outcome plus long-term questionnaire-based follow-up.Retrospective review of canine traumatic elbow luxations (2006 to 2013) treated at five referral centres. Data recorded included signalment, luxation aetiology, time to reduction, reduction technique, surgical procedure, post-reduction care and complications. Questionnaire follow-up was attempted for all cases with owners completing the Canine Brief Pain Inventory.Thirty-seven dogs were included. The most frequent cause of luxation was road traffic accident (n=22). Twenty cases were treated surgically. Seven dogs suffered major postoperative complications: reluxation (n=6), infection requiring implant removal (n=1). Four of the six reluxations occurred in dogs that had other orthopaedic injuries. Twenty-two owners completed the Canine Brief Pain Inventory questionnaire: there were 13 excellent, 6 very good, 1 good and 2 fair outcomes. Outcome was not associated with the reduction technique.Initial closed reduction, followed by surgical stabilisation if unsuccessful, results in good-to-excellent outcomes in the majority of traumatic canine elbow luxations. Reluxation was the most common major complication and there was a higher incidence of reluxation in patients with multiple orthopaedic injuries.


Moores A.P.,Anderson Moores Veterinary Specialists | Agthe P.,Anderson Moores Veterinary Specialists | Schaafsma I.A.,Anderson Moores Veterinary Specialists
Veterinary and Comparative Orthopaedics and Traumatology | Year: 2012

Objectives: To determine the prevalence of incomplete ossification of the humeral condyle (IOHC) and other osseous abnormalities of the elbow in English Springer Spaniels with no history of lameness. Methods: Prospective observational study of English Springer Spaniels with no recent history of lameness. Computed tomography scans of both elbows were obtained from dogs older than six months of age which were anaesthetized or sedated for reasons unrelated to this study. Computed tomography scans were reviewed for the presence of IOHC and other abnormalities of the elbow. Radio-ulnar incongruity (RUI) measurements from normal elbows were compared to elbows with IOHC and elbows with medial coronoid process (MCP) abnormalities. Results: Computed tomography scans from 50 dogs (100 elbows) were reviewed. The prevalence of IOHC was 14% (8 elbows in 7 dogs). All condylar fissures were incomplete with a mean length of 2.6 mm. Fifty percent of the dogs (44% of elbows) had abnormalities of the medial coronoid process and 60% of the elbows had periarticular osteophytes. Group RUI meansurements for IOHC and MCP were not significantly different from normal elbows. Clinical significance: Small IOHC fissures, periarticular osteophytes and MCP abnormalities may be identified in English Springer Spaniels without forelimb lameness. Abnormalities of the MCP are more common than IOHC.


Pratesi A.,Anderson Moores Veterinary Specialists | Grierson J.,Anderson Moores Veterinary Specialists | Moores A.P.,Anderson Moores Veterinary Specialists
Veterinary and Comparative Orthopaedics and Traumatology | Year: 2012

This report describes the diagnosis and treatment of a traumatic avulsion of the lateral head of the gastrocnemius muscle in a three-and-a-half-year-old male neutered Domestic Shorthaired cat. Surgical repair was achieved using a modified three-loop pulley suture pattern passed through a suture anchor inserted at the point of origin of the tendon and around the fabella. A stifle flexion device was utilised during the postoperative period to protect the repair. Follow-up at five months showed a return to normal function. This is the first report of avulsion of the lateral head of the gastrocnemius in a cat.


Pratesi A.,Anderson Moores Veterinary Specialists | Moores A.P.,Anderson Moores Veterinary Specialists | Downes C.,Torrington Orthopaedics | Grierson J.,Anderson Moores Veterinary Specialists | Maddox T.W.,University of Liverpool
Veterinary Surgery | Year: 2015

Objectives: To investigate whether administration of postoperative oral antimicrobial drugs has a beneficial effect on preventing surgical site infections (SSI) in clean orthopedic surgery involving stainless steel plating systems. Study Design: Randomized prospective clinical study. Animals: Dogs (n=97). Methods: One hundred consecutive cases (97 dogs) that had clean orthopedic surgery requiring stainless steel plate fixation were randomly assigned using a random number generator to either YES group (administration of postoperative oral antimicrobials) or NO group (no administration of postoperative oral antimicrobials). Dogs in YES group were administered oral cefalexin or potentiated amoxicillin for 7 days, whereas dogs in NO group were discharged without oral antibiotics. Minimum follow-up was 12 months. Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine risk factors for SSI. Results: Overall postoperative infection rate was 12.9%. Infection occurred in 2 cases (4.3%) administered postoperative oral antimicrobials and in 10 cases (21.3%) not administered postoperative antimicrobials. Total anesthetic time and use of oral antimicrobials were the only significant factors associated with SSI. Use of postoperative antimicrobials was associated with a significant reduction in the risk of infection by ~84% and risk of infection was increased by ~2% for each minute increase in anesthesia time. Conclusions: Administration of oral postoperative antimicrobials had a protective effect against development of SSI in clean orthopedic implant surgery. © 2015 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.


PubMed | Anderson Moores Veterinary Specialists, Torrington Orthopaedics and University of Liverpool
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Veterinary surgery : VS | Year: 2015

To investigate whether administration of postoperative oral antimicrobial drugs has a beneficial effect on preventing surgical site infections (SSI) in clean orthopedic surgery involving stainless steel plating systems.Randomized prospective clinical study.Dogs (n=97).One hundred consecutive cases (97 dogs) that had clean orthopedic surgery requiring stainless steel plate fixation were randomly assigned using a random number generator to either YES group (administration of postoperative oral antimicrobials) or NO group (no administration of postoperative oral antimicrobials). Dogs in YES group were administered oral cefalexin or potentiated amoxicillin for 7 days, whereas dogs in NO group were discharged without oral antibiotics. Minimum follow-up was 12 months. Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine risk factors for SSI.Overall postoperative infection rate was 12.9%. Infection occurred in 2 cases (4.3%) administered postoperative oral antimicrobials and in 10 cases (21.3%) not administered postoperative antimicrobials. Total anesthetic time and use of oral antimicrobials were the only significant factors associated with SSI. Use of postoperative antimicrobials was associated with a significant reduction in the risk of infection by ~84% and risk of infection was increased by ~2% for each minute increase in anesthesia time.Administration of oral postoperative antimicrobials had a protective effect against development of SSI in clean orthopedic implant surgery.


PubMed | Anderson Moores Veterinary Specialists
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Journal of feline medicine and surgery | Year: 2012

Cats commonly present with joint disease and trauma. A methodical approach to diagnostics and treatment can aid the clinician in the management of these cases.Cats with joint disease may present with a vague history owing to their independent nature, and gait assessment is often challenging when compared with the dog. Knowledge of feline-specific anatomy is important to avoid over- or misinterpretation of physical examination or imaging findings.This review of feline joint disease focuses on the more common, non-traumatic conditions of the hip, stifle and elbow. It aims to provide first opinion clinicians with a guide to decision making that will assist them in achieving a diagnosis and formulating a management strategy.There is an extensive body of original articles and textbooks in the published literature relating to aspects of feline joint disease. This article combines information from key companion animal and feline-specific references together with the authors clinical experience to provide a practical overview of joint disease, and highlight important differences between cats and dogs in terms of presentation and treatment.

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