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News Article | November 3, 2016
Site: globenewswire.com

LEHI, Utah and SAN FRANCISCO, Nov. 03, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Ancestry, the global leader in family history and consumer genomics, today announced three new appointments to its growing leadership team. As the world’s largest consumer genomics provider, having genotyped 2.5 million DNA samples, Ancestry is continuing to add to its roster of talent as it seeks to help millions of consumers better understand themselves and the world around them by unlocking the secrets hidden in their genes. “Amy, Sarah and Todd are joining in three roles that will have immense impact for Ancestry as we’re focused on continuing to provide powerful insights to our community and they more than live up to the best of the best we strive for when bringing on new talent,” said Tim Sullivan, chief executive officer of Ancestry. “We are struck daily by how the insights we provide can powerfully reshape someone’s understanding of who they are and how they fit into the bigger puzzle of our species. We’re excited to have Amy, Sarah and Todd help us focus on bringing new insights, products and growth.” Gershkoff, South and Davis bring incredible track records in their respective fields, and will help Ancestry continue to grow and innovate while providing consumers unmatched insights into their identities derived from the Company’s unique combination of genomic and genealogical data. Amy Gershkoff was most recently the chief data officer at Zynga, a pioneer in social gaming. Previously, she built and led the Customer Analytics & Insights team and led the Global Data Science team at eBay. Before eBay, Gershkoff was the chief data scientist for WPP, Data Alliance, where she worked across WPP’s more than 350 operating companies worldwide to create integrated data and technology solutions. As the head of media planning at Obama for America for the 2012 campaign, she architected Obama’s advertising strategy and designed the campaign's analytics systems. Her work has brought numerous accolades, including being featured in The Washington Post as one of the nation’s most prominent innovators and being named one of the “Top 50 Women to Watch in Tech” and one of San Francisco's Most Influential Women in Business by the San Francisco Business TImes. She holds a Ph.D. from Princeton University. Prior to joining Ancestry, Sarah South was the vice president of Laboratory Services at 23andme. She is certified in clinical cytogenetics by the American Board of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ABMGG). Previously, South was associate professor in the Department of Pathology at the University of Utah. She also served as a medical director at ARUP Laboratories and oversaw the Cytogenetic and Genomic Microarray Laboratories and directed the ABMGG clinical cytogenetics training program at the University of Utah. Sarah has also been the CLIA lab director for Lineagen. Her industry associations include, vice-chair of the American College of Medical Genetics Quality Assurance Committee; a member of the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute Expert Panel for Molecular Methodologies and the ClinGen variant classification workgroup; a certified College of American Pathology Laboratory Inspector, and president of the American Cytogenetics Association. South also serves as an associate editor for the American Journal of Medical Genetics. She received her Ph.D. from the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in Human Genetics, and completed a postdoctoral research fellowship in prenatal genetics at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, and a clinical cytogenetics fellowship at the University of Utah. Todd Davis joins Ancestry from Dropbox, where he led global talent acquisition. Prior to Dropbox, Davis spent four years leading Amazon’s global efforts to find and recruit across the company. Before joining Amazon in 2012, Davis was vice president, worldwide recruitment at Warner Bros. Entertainment, where he led efforts to improve global recruitment and talent acquisition resources by leveraging "best practices" in talent assessment and selection. He has also held senior positions at Centene Corporation, West Coast University and Volt Information Sciences. Davis is a board member of CASY and MSCCN and holds a Bachelor of Science from the University of New Hampshire. Ancestry, the global leader in family history and consumer genomics, harnesses the information found in family trees, historical records, and DNA to help people gain a new level of understanding about their lives. Ancestry has more than 2.4 million paying subscribers across its core Ancestry websites and more than 2.5 million DNA samples in the AncestryDNA database. Since 1996, more than 19 billion records have been added, and users have created more than 80 million family trees on the Ancestry flagship site and its affiliated international websites. Ancestry offers a suite of family history products and services including AncestryDNA, Archives, ProGenealogists, Newspapers.com and Fold3.


News Article | September 14, 2016
Site: www.fastcompany.com

When she was 22, Jordon Goulder lost her dad to the neurodegenerative disease called ALS. That same year, she discovered that he wasn't her biological father. Goulder, who is now 26 and works in public relations, learned from her mother that her parents had experienced fertility troubles before she was born. A fertility specialist recommended that they try an anonymous sperm donor. Her parents agreed to keep this quiet until her father passed away. Goulder was curious about her biological father from the outset: Was he alive and healthy? Did he have children or share her features? Her mother didn't have much information aside from a few biographical details and the name of the facility, which had subsequently shut down. When Jordon tried calling the hospital next door, the operator laughed at her request and muttered something about patient privacy before hanging up. "I was emotional at the time, so I don't remember the conversation verbatim," she remembers. "It was enough to stop me from looking for him for quite a while, and caused me to harbor some anger that I may never have access to information about my genes." But Goulder didn't give up for good. She sent in samples of her saliva to various consumer-genetics services, which connect users with their family members. On two of these sites, 23andMe and FamilyTreeDNA, she was connected to one of her biological father's cousins. But AncestryDNA revealed a direct match to a man who chose to publish his name, as well as other relatives with the same last name. She quickly found his profile on Facebook, and noted that they shared the same thick, dark eyebrows. From there, she was able to track down a daughter who happened to live nearby in Portland, Oregon. "I know what she looks like so I look for her all the time, but also fear that I’ll run into her," she says. Goulder is far from alone in using these services to find a biological parent. Due to a lack of record keeping, it's far from clear how many children each year are conceived via a sperm or egg donor, although some estimate that it ranges between 30,000 and 60,000 a year in the U.S. Sites such as Donor Sibling Registry have popped up to offer advice and a community to donors and donor-conceived people, including guiding them to DNA databases with more than 50,000 members where they can be matched with relatives. "As the database grows, the probability that a user will find a close genetic relative increases," says Ken Chahine, executive vice president at Ancestry. "But it wasn't designed for that purpose." Goulder attempted to get in touch with her donor via Facebook and Ancestry's messaging services, but she doesn't know if he received her message. He hasn't logged in for a while. It's possible that he doesn't want to know her, has pushed the whole thing out of his mind, or simply doesn't know she's trying to contact him. In an age of consumer DNA testing, some bioethicists say that it's time to revisit the notion of anonymous sperm donation. Is it really possible in this day and age to keep a donor's identity anonymous? And should the sperm banks do more to warn potential donors that they might be found if they or a relative submits their DNA to a genealogical service? "When these sperm banks were set up, there were often confidentiality agreements in which a prospective father would say that he never wanted to be contacted, or that he'd be open to it when the child is 18," says Kayte Spector-Bagdady, a postdoctoral research fellow at the Center for Bioethics & Social Sciences in Medicine at the University of Michigan. "But services like 23andMe have created an additional opportunity that supersedes these previous arrangements, where children created by egg or sperm donors can figure it out." "If a donor doesn’t want to be found, they simply shouldn't donate." 23andMe CEO Anne Wojcicki says that one of the three major reasons that people sign up is to find family members: "The adoptive community and sperm donor community are really active." At a minimum, Spector-Bagdady recommends that sperm banks disclose this to their potential donors. Others have gone a step further in calling for lawmakers to ban anonymity altogether, arguing that donor offspring like Goulder should have the right to know the identity of their biological parents. "If a donor doesn’t want to be found, they simply shouldn't donate," says Wendy Kramer, director of Donor Sibling Registry, which is a not-for-profit organization. "Yet the sperm banks don’t tell prospective donors that because they’ll make less money." Kramer says her son was one of the earliest users of these sites, and figured out the identity of his donor back in 2005. One sperm donor I spoke to, who requested anonymity, said he had his own reservations about DNA-testing services, but he didn't discuss this with the sperm bank. Moreover, as far as he could tell, the facility didn't ask for references or verify anything he told them about his Ivy League education or health history. He had donated sperm on a whim after graduating with a mountain of college debt ("My thinking at the time was that if I got $100 every time I masturbated, that's a good deal"). He put the experience to the back of his mind until our conversation, in which he shared myriad concerns. "They seemed to want people with attractive qualities, but those people might be sensitive to requests to speak to their mother or their college," he said. "It was a balancing act of attracting donors, while reducing friction." According to Kramer, the root of the problem is the lack of rules or regulation when it comes to buying and selling sperm. For instance, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration requires that donors get tested for some communicable diseases, but there is no federal requirement that sperm banks screen for genetic diseases. As a result, testing practices vary widely among different facilities. In recent years, cases have hit the headlines where a donor unknowingly has hundreds of children, or wasn't properly tested for various genetic diseases. One family was told that a donor had a clean bill of health, but their child was born with cystic fibrosis. Both the mother and the donor were carriers of the disease. Kramer adds that sperm banks are also inconsistent in how they mediate relationships between donors and their offspring. She says that many will send an ambiguous letter in the mail, and then call it a day. Cases have reached the courts where sperm banks failed to notify a family when a donor gets sick or has a history of disease, or didn't amend their donor’s medical profile as new medical information came to light. Of a handful of sperm banks contacted by Fast Company, only California Cryobank responded to a request for comment. Company spokesman Scott Brown stressed that the team will facilitate contact when the child is 18, if the donor is open to it. He says many donors who requested anonymity are willing. Brown agrees that the rise of commercial DNA testing companies has been transformative, but he doesn't agree that all anonymity should be waived. "It would be unreasonable for a sperm donor today to believe they’ll never be contacted," he says. In light of this, he urges donor offspring to wait until they're 18 and initiate contact through the sperm bank rather than through 23andMe, Facebook, and the like. "That sets up a difficult and devastating situation for both parties," he says. "If you’re going to show up on the guy’s doorstep, it could affect his life and jeopardize things for all other offspring that might be waiting the proper amount of time." Brown says the company will screen potential candidates to check if they're a carrier for a variety of genetic diseases, including cystic fibrosis and spinal muscular atrophy. Ancestry's team has researched the implications of customers using the service to connect with donor or adoptive parents. Their core mission is to help people understand their origins. Several years ago, the company invited a group of bioethicists into their offices to figure out what to do. "They were in favor of giving the right information to people, rather than trying to hide it," says Chahine. But all those who register for the site can request anonymity so their identity wouldn't be revealed to a donor offspring, for instance. One 23andMe user in her mid-forties has bonded with her eight new brothers and sisters. 23andMe's Wojcicki says the team has thought about ways to adequately educate users about surprising results. Users have learned through the site that they were adopted or donor-conceived, before a parent told them the truth. Research from 2005 found that cases of paternity discrepancy, when a child is identified as being biologically fathered by someone other than the man who believes he is the father, occurs between .8% to 30% in the population. The company's terms and conditions make it explicitly clear: "This information may evoke strong emotions and has the potential to alter your life and worldview. You may discover things about yourself that trouble you and that you may not have the ability to control or change." Experts are divided on whether these sites should be doing more to educate and inform their users. Spector-Bagdady commends 23andMe for its explicit language, but is concerned that few people read the terms of service. She has argued in the past that this information is inherently medical, as it relates to family medical histories, and that direct-to-consumer companies have enhanced obligations to return these results more like clinicians than for-profit businesses. It's unclear how they would do that, as these sites don't know ahead of time whether they're delivering surprising results. "From an ethical perspective, it's still very much up for debate," she says. All told, those I spoke to who connected with donor parents or half-siblings relayed mostly positive experiences. One 23andMe user in her mid-forties, who goes by the pseudonym Marcia, has bonded with her eight new brothers and sisters. None of them never met their biological father, who passed away at a fairly young age. "This has been a huge and unexpected blessing," she says. "You'll find many people who are angry or feel a loss of identity, but this struck us differently." Jordon Goulder's wedding is coming up in a few weeks. For the time being, she's hit the pause button on her search for her biological father. She's considering a certified letter at some point, so at least she'll know if he's received it. Her friends are confident that he submitted DNA to Ancestry, so he must be curious. She's keeping her hopes up. "I think it will happen eventually."


News Article | October 27, 2016
Site: www.businesswire.com

SALT LAKE CITY--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Recursion Pharmaceuticals, an emerging biotech in Salt Lake City, today announced that successful and serial technology entrepreneur and executive John Pereira, MBA, has joined the team as Chief Operating Officer. As former COO of Experticity, VP of AncestryDNA, and a leader of operational growth at Amazon in its earlier days, Mr. Pereira brings a wealth of experience in business management, operations and technology strategy to Recursion’s rapidly growing business. Chris Gibson, PhD, CEO of Recursion stated: “We are elated to bring John in as COO. His history of guiding businesses from startups to successes, and his extraordinary background in management, operations and strategy across industries is the perfect fit for us as we rapidly scale our complex business to meet the needs of our current and future partners, and ultimately to deliver on our mission to help bring 100 new treatments to patients in the coming years.” The announcement of Mr. Pereira as COO follows closely on Recursion’s recent announcement of a successful $12.9M Series A funding round. “John’s business acumen, track-record and his background in mathematics was a clear fit for our transformational approach to leveraging technology, big data, and artificial intelligence to change the way drug discovery is conducted,” said Blake Borgeson, PhD, CTO of Recursion. Leading Silicon Valley deep technology Venture Firm Lux Capital led the recent Series A. "Folks of John's technology and operational caliber simply don't find their way to pharma often. This addition is indicative of Recursion's multidisciplinary approach and hyper-focus on technology development and operations first and foremost," said Lux's Zavain Dar, who also sits on the Recursion Board. "We see this not as a standalone announcement, but as a continued call to arms for top technologists and entrepreneurs across the country that Recursion is leading the charge in AI and pharma. If you're serious about disrupting biotech with technology, AI, and automation, then there is unequivocally no other place to be." “Recursion's unique approach, at the intersection of data science, artificial intelligence, and biology is truly impressive and groundbreaking. I couldn't be more excited to join the team and help build out a world-class organization focused on curing diseases with unprecedented efficiency,” said John Pereira. Mr. Pereira is former COO of Experticity, a service that connects millions of industry experts with the world’s biggest brands and retailers to increase sales. Prior to Experticity, Mr. Pereira was Vice President of all Product, Marketing and Operational activities at AncestryDNA, Ancestry.com’s DNA business unit, where he built and launched the service, ultimately delivering on Ancestry’s unique combination of genomics with family history. Mr. Pereira has also served as Senior Manager of Operations Integration at Amazon.com, where he increased partnerships and oversaw operations of the Canadian fulfillment center, and a Naval Officer for the US Navy, where he led the Navigation and Administrative Department of the USS Reid, among other positions and duties. In addition to these positions, Mr. Pereira serves on the Board of Directors for Athletigen and the Advisory Board of Channel Signal. Mr. Pereira has a passion for new technology and a desire to break down traditional business barriers that pervades every aspect of his career. Recursion Pharmaceuticals, LLC, is a Salt Lake City-based drug discovery company founded in 2013 based on technology developed at the University of Utah. Recursion uses a novel drug screening platform to efficiently reposition known drugs and shelved pharmaceutical assets to treat rare genetic diseases and other conditions. The company’s original focus on rare genetic diseases is much-needed, as there are more than 5,000 such conditions that together affect millions of Americans, and more than 95 percent of these diseases have no approved therapy. Recursion’s novel drug screening platform combines experimental biology and bioinformatics in a massively parallel system to quickly and efficiently identify treatments for multiple rare genetic diseases, or any disease that can be modeled at the cellular level. The core of the approach revolves around high-throughput automated screening using high-content assays in human cells, which allows the near simultaneous modeling of hundreds of genetic and other diseases. Rich data from these assays is probed using advanced statistical and machine learning approaches, and the effects of thousands of known drugs, shelved drug candidates, and novel chemical matter can be investigated efficiently to identify those holding the most promise for the treatment of disease. Learn more at www.recursionpharma.com, or connect with us on Twitter @RecursionPharma, Facebook www.facebook.com/RecursionPharma/, and LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/company/recursion-pharmaceuticals.


LEHI, Utah, Dec. 01, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- December 7th will mark the 75th anniversary of the attacks on Pearl Harbor, and the nation will pause to remember that tragic day in 1941. Fold3 will honor those who served at Pearl Harbor during the attack by showcasing the family and military history of 12 Pearl Harbor veterans. Everyone has a unique story of what led to them, and the heroes at Pearl Harbor are no exception. Featured stories include: To learn about all 12 featured survivors, visit www.fold3.com/pearlharbor. Anyone visiting the site can view the Fold3 USS Arizona interactive virtual memorial and receive free access to more than 113 million WWII records during the month of December. Fold3 hopes these resources can help each user discover their own military ancestors and the brave lives they led. The WWII collections contain 35 million WWII draft registration cards, including over 11 million young men’s draft cards available only on Fold3. Also included are the Pearl Harbor Muster Rolls with more than 1.7 million records of personnel assigned to ships based at Pearl Harbor for the years 1939-1947. A few of the WWII records available to view for free in December include: Visitors to the site can also receive $10 off AncestryDNA, and $30 off a Fold3 annual membership. Fold3 provides convenient access to military records, including the stories, photos, and personal documents of the men and women who served. The Fold3 name comes from a traditional flag folding ceremony in which the third fold is made in honor and remembrance of veterans who served in defense of their country and to maintain peace throughout the world. Digital images of original records at Fold3 help you discover and share stories about these everyday heroes, forgotten soldiers, and the families that supported them. On Fold3, you can combine records found on the site with what you have in your own albums and shoeboxes to create an online memorial for someone who served. Ancestry, the global leader in family history and consumer genomics, harnesses the information found in family trees, historical records, and DNA to help people gain a new level of understanding about their lives. Ancestry has more than 2.4 million paying subscribers across its core Ancestry websites and more than 2.5 million DNA samples in the AncestryDNA database. Since 1996, more than 19 billion records have been added, and users have created more than 80 million family trees on the Ancestry flagship site and its affiliated international websites. Ancestry offers a suite of family history products and services including AncestryDNA, Archives, ProGenealogists, Newspapers.com and Fold3.


Othman Laraki and Elad Gil were sitting on Twitter’s roof deck after their previous company Mixer Labs had been acquired. Gil had brought a small hard drive with him — which happened to contain data on his genome being sequenced — and Laraki wanted to take a look at the data. That led to the original hypothesis of Color Genomics: what if you could apply the same principles of data science and deep learning to analyzing the human genome, bringing the cost of scouring our information for signs of cancer and other potential problems and making it more widely available? Fast forward a few years later and the pair, along with co-founders Taylor Sittler and Nish Bhat have started and are running a genomic testing company, Color Genomics. The company today said it has raised an additional $45 million in capital in a round led by General Catalyst Partners, with new board members Hemant Taneja (of GC) and Susan Wagner (co-founder of Blackrock and also on the board of Apple). “We’re living through that transition into really starting to use this massive amount of data in the actual delivery of care process,” co-founder Laraki said. “It’s kind of funny when we take our cars to get an oil change they probably pick up more info from the car’s computer than our bodies when we go see the doctor. That transition I think is one of the big things that’s happening, what I think is really exciting about this timeline, we are living through that massive addition of data into how we think about care and prevention and such.” Right now, Color Genomics is focusing on testing for mutations that can lead to a higher risk for cancers, like ovarian, breast, prostate and colon cancer. If the patients know that they are higher-risk, they can practice the best-known methods to help prevent those cancers from getting worse, such as getting regularly tested — in the case of colon cancer, regularly getting colonoscopies. Color Genomics patients provide the company a saliva sample, which is tested with a combination of in-house scientists and software engineers that dig through the data available from those tests in order to find mutations that can lead to a higher risk of cancer. The data collected is shipped off to cloud servers to crunch through it. There’s an incentive for companies and other payers to get these kinds of tests. While the current test costs $249, if a payer ends up covering part or most of the cost, in the long run detecting risk for cancer and intervening can lead to an incredible cost savings for payers. If you’re a company covering medical insurance, it makes perfect fiscal sense to offer — and encourage — employees to regularly get these kinds of tests done. “For companies in many ways, they wear multiple hats,” Laraki said. “They’re payers, they’re covering the cost of cancer treatments which is very expensive. Preventing late-stage cancer once pays for an entire program. In addition they’re obviously very deeply aligned with the well-being and the actual outcomes for their population. For them it ends up being this double-value where it has a very direct ROI but in addition the employees and families are very grateful and happy to have access to something like this.” AncestryDNA And Google's Calico Team Up To Study Genetic Longevity Ancestry.com Welcomes AncestryHealth To The Family MyHeritage Passes 5 Billion Historical Records, Adds 5 Million Daily 23andMe Ceases Health-Focused Gene Testing, Still Offers Raw Genetic Data And Ancestry Reports A recurring question during the meetings with Taneja as the company was looking into this recent financing round was how Color Genomics could make a test like this accessible to tens or hundreds of millions of people. That would prove the big question to the riddle as to whether a genetic testing company like this could be a profitable enterprise in addition to working to build tests that scan for dangerous mutations. “I don’t think you can subsidize your way to something that’s accessible to a full population,” Laraki said. “Having something that’s truly worthwhile from a payer standpoint, government or company, that if you invest X and get more than X back out — turning that and demonstrating it’s ROI positive, that’s a big piece there.” As part of extending the test’s reach into additional markets — and people — Color Genomics is launching a program that offers family members of people who have paid for tests an option to also get tested for $50. If someone ends up being a carrier of a mutation that can lead to a higher risk of cancer, that mutation came from somewhere in the family tree, and identifying who else possesses it can also help them potentially intervene before things get worse. Of course, relative to any kind of genetic testing — or any medical-related testing — is the overcast of the fallout from the Theranos scandal. What Laraki says is that the company applies many widely used standards and robotics, in addition to being highly transparent and publishing its validation data and working with well-known scientists. There are, of course, potential competitors that could arise. Genetic testing startups like 23andMe and Ancestry.com, which Laraki says focus more on “recreational” understanding of the human genome and a person’s background, could decide to branch into an area like this. Laraki says the company’s deep focus initially on detecting risks for cancer and application of data science is what will eventually lead Color Genomics to being a full-fledged company. And if they’re successful, they can potentially grow into other kinds of operations. “Part of the conversation was, what happens when you assemble truly world class software engineering team to work on this information, what can we do for people,” Laraki said. “If we can drop the cost of these tests by an order of magnitude, do we fundamentally change the math around clinical genetics. Not the recreational genetics, but clinical stuff. We’re really focused on building the infrastructure to make that possible, proving to ourselves that was something that would work.” Color Genomics launched its first product about a year ago, and has in total raised $60 million.


News Article | November 2, 2016
Site: globenewswire.com

LEHI, Utah, Nov. 02, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Ancestry, the global leader in family history and consumer genomics, today announced its expected participation in the following investor conference: J.P. Morgan Leveraged Finance Conference Wednesday, November 9, 2016 4:00 PM Central Time New Orleans, LA Howard Hochhauser, CFO/COO will conduct a formal presentation and participate in one-on-one meetings. Ancestry, the global leader in family history and consumer genomics, harnesses the information found in family trees, historical records, and DNA to help people gain a new level of understanding about their lives. Ancestry has more than 2.4 million paying subscribers across its core Ancestry websites and more than 2.5 million DNA samples in the AncestryDNA database. Since 1996, more than 19 billion records have been added, and users have created more than 80 million family trees on the Ancestry flagship site and its affiliated international websites. Ancestry offers a suite of family history products and services including AncestryDNA, Archives, ProGenealogists, Newspapers.com and Fold3.


LEHI, Utah, Feb. 22, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Ancestry, the global leader in family history and consumer genomics, today announced its expected participation in the following investor conference: Tim Sullivan, CEO and Howard Hochhauser, CFO/COO will conduct a formal presentation and participate in one-on-one meetings. Ancestry, the global leader in family history and consumer genomics, harnesses the information found in family trees, historical records and DNA to help people gain a new level of understanding about their lives. Ancestry has more than 2.5 million paying subscribers across its core Ancestry websites and more than 3 million people in the AncestryDNA network. Since 1996, more than 20 billion records have been added to Ancestry's databases, and users have created more than 80 million family trees on the Ancestry flagship site and its affiliated international websites. Ancestry offers a suite of family history products and services including AncestryDNA, Archives, AncestryProGenealogists, Newspapers.com and Fold3. AncestryDNA is owned and operated by Ancestry.com DNA, LLC, a subsidiary of Ancestry.com, LLC.


LEHI, Utah, Nov. 03, 2016 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Ancestry, the global leader in family history and consumer genomics, today announced its expected participation in the following investor conference: Morgan Stanley Leveraged Finance Conference Wednesday, November 9, 2016 4:00 PM Central Time New Orleans, LA Howard Hochhauser, CFO/COO will conduct a formal presentation and participate in one-on-one meetings. Ancestry, the global leader in family history and consumer genomics, harnesses the information found in family trees, historical records, and DNA to help people gain a new level of understanding about their lives. Ancestry has more than 2.4 million paying subscribers across its core Ancestry websites and more than 2.5 million DNA samples in the AncestryDNA database. Since 1996, more than 19 billion records have been added, and users have created more than 80 million family trees on the Ancestry flagship site and its affiliated international websites. Ancestry offers a suite of family history products and services including AncestryDNA, Archives, ProGenealogists, Newspapers.com and Fold3.


News Article | November 21, 2016
Site: www.fastcompany.com

Anne Wojcicki’s DNA testing company has rebounded from its 2013 FDA slapdown by concentrating on genealogy and slowly reintroducing health reports. It’s also working with researchers to help in drug discovery and development. The genealogy giant, which focuses on connecting customers with lost relatives, claims some 1.5 million genomes in its database, thanks to its AncestryDNA testing kit. Like Helix, this new service promises to bring down the cost of sequencing. Users will be able to peruse genetic insights online via a data-visualization tool. Founded by veterans of Google and Twitter, Color looks for common genes associated with a higher risk of hereditary cancers for a flat rate of $224. For $999, it puts your whole genome on a smartphone and offers information on health- and lifestyle-related genes. A version of this article appeared in the December 2016/January 2017 issue of Fast Company magazine.


Scozzari R.,University of Rome La Sapienza | Massaia A.,University of Rome La Sapienza | Trombetta B.,University of Rome La Sapienza | Bellusci G.,University of Rome Tor Vergata | And 4 more authors.
Genome Research | Year: 2014

Sequence diversity and the ages of the deepest nodes of the MSY phylogeny remain largely unexplored due to the severely biased collection of SNPs available for study. We characterized 68 worldwide Y chromosomes by high-coverage nextgeneration sequencing, including 18 deep-rooting ones, and identified 2386 SNPs, 80% of which were novel. Many aspects of this pool of variants resembled the pattern observed among genome-wide de novo events, suggesting that in the MSY, a large proportion of newly arisen alleles has survived in the phylogeny. Some degree of purifying selection emerged in the form of an excess of private missense variants. Our tree recapitulated the previously known topology, but the relative lengths of major branches were drastically modified and the associated node ages were remarkably older. We found significantly different branch lengths when comparing the rare deep-rootedA1b African lineage with the rest of the tree. Our dating results and phylogeography led to the following main conclusions: (1) Patrilineal lineages with ages approaching those of early AMH fossils survive today only in central-western Africa; (2) only a few evolutionarily successful MSY lineages survived between 160 and 115 kya; and (3) an early exit out of Africa (before 70 kya), which fits recent western Asian archaeological evidence, should be considered. Our experimental design produced an unbiased resource of new MSY markers informative for the initial formation of the anatomically modern human gene pool, i.e., a period of our evolution that had been previously considered to be poorly accessible with paternally inherited markers. © 2014 Scozzari et al.

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