ANBAS Corporation

Kita-ku, Japan

ANBAS Corporation

Kita-ku, Japan

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Nagai K.,ANBAS Corporation | Nagai K.,Osaka University | Tanida M.,ANBAS Corporation | Tanida M.,Osaka University | And 9 more authors.
Amino Acids | Year: 2012

l-Carnosine (β-alanyl-l-histidine; CAR) is synthesized in mammalian skeletal muscle. Although the physiological roles of CAR have not yet been clarified, there is evidence that the release of CAR from skeletal muscle during physical exercise affects autonomic neurotransmission and physiological functions. In particular, CAR affects the activity of sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves innervating the adrenal glands, liver, kidney, pancreas, stomach, and white and brown adipose tissues, thereby causing changes in blood pressure, blood glucose, appetite, lipolysis, and thermogenesis. CAR-mediated changes in neurotransmission and physiological functions were eliminated by histamine H1 or H3 receptor antagonists (diphenhydramine or thioperamide) and bilateral lesions of the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), a master circadian clock. Moreover, a carnosine-degrading enzyme (carnosinase 2) was shown to be localized to histamine neurons in the hypothalamic tuberomammillary nucleus (TMN). Thus, CAR released from skeletal muscle during exercise may be transported into TMN-histamine neurons and hydrolyzed. The resulting l-histidine may subsequently be converted into histamine, which could be responsible for the effects of CAR on neurotransmission and physiological function. Thus, CAR appears to influence hypoglycemic, hypotensive, and lipolytic activity through regulation of autonomic nerves and with the involvement of the SCN and histamine. These findings are reviewed and discussed in the context of other recent reports, including those on carnosine synthetases, carnosinases, and carnosine transport. © 2012 Springer-Verlag.


Horii Y.,ANBAS Corporation | Horii Y.,Kyoto Institute of Technology | Tanida M.,ANBAS Corporation | Shen J.,ANBAS Corporation | And 6 more authors.
Skin Research and Technology | Year: 2011

Background/purpose: We observed that olfactory stimulation with scent of grapefruit oil elevated the activities of sympathetic nerves, and increased the plasma glycerol concentration and blood pressure. In contrast, olfactory stimulation with scent of lavender oil had opposite effects in rats. These suggest that changes in autonomic activities cause physiological functions via histaminergic H1 and H3 receptor. Moreover, it has been reported that somatic sensory stimulation affected autonomic neurotransmission. To examine effects of skin application of urea-containing cream on cutaneous arterial sympathetic nerve activity (CASNA), blood flow, and transepidermal water loss (TEWL).Method: The activity of CASNA was determined by electrophysiological method, and cutaneous blood flow was determined using laser flowmeter in urethane-anesthetized rats, TEWL was measured using VapoMeter in the back skin of HWY hairless rats.Results: CASNA was markedly and significantly inhibited by skin application of 10% urea-containing cream, whereas cutaneous blood flow was significantly elevated via histaminergic H3-receptor. In conscious hairless rats, TEWL was significantly decreased 24 h after application of 10% urea-containing cream to the back skin.Conclusion: These findings suggest that skin application of 10% urea-containing cream increases the cutaneous blood flow and water retaining ability, and that histaminergic H3-receptors may mediate these effects. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.


Tanida M.,Ritsumeikan University | Tanida M.,Osaka University | Tanida M.,ANBAS Corporation | Shen J.,Osaka University | And 4 more authors.
Physiological Research | Year: 2010

Previous studies have demonstrated that central injection of L-carnosine (β-alynyl-L-histidine), dipeptide synthesized in mammalian muscles, affects renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA) and blood pressure (BP) in anesthetized rats. In the present study, using urethane-anesthetized rats, we examined the dose-dependent effects of intravenous (IV) injection of various doses of anserine, dipeptide of similar structure to L-carnosine, on RSNA, BP and heart rate (HR). We found that injection of a low dose of anserine (1 μg) significantly suppressed RSNA, BP and HR. Conversely, a high dose (1000 μg) of anserine significantly elevated RSNA, BP and HR. Pretreatment with lateral cerebral ventricular (LCV) injection of thioperamide, a histaminergic H3-receptor antagonist, eliminated the effects of a low dose of anserine on RSNA, BP and HR. LCV injection of diphenhydramine, a histaminergic H1-receptor antagonist, abolished the effects of a high dose of anserine on RSNA, BP and HR. These findings suggest that anserine affects RSNA, BP and HR in a dose-dependent manner, and that the histaminergic nerve may be involved in the dose-different effects of anserine in rats. © 2010 Institute of Physiology v.v.i., Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague, Czech Republic.


Tanida M.,Ritsumeikan University | Shintani N.,Osaka University | Morita Y.,Osaka University | Tsukiyama N.,Osaka University | And 7 more authors.
Regulatory Peptides | Year: 2010

Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) is a peptidergic neurotransmitter that is expressed in high levels in nervous systems. Here, we investigated the roles of PACAP in autonomic system regulation by evaluating the changes caused in the autonomic nerve activities after injecting PACAP into the central nervous system (CNS) and examining stress-induced blood glucose changes in PACAP-deficient (PACAP-/-) mice. Renal sympathetic nerve activity (RSNA), blood pressure, and heart rate were elevated after injecting PACAP into the third cerebral ventricle (3CV). Similarly, other sympathetic nerve activities, including adrenal sympathetic nerve activity (ASNA), celiac sympathetic nerve activity (CSNA), and brown adipose tissue sympathetic nerve activity (BAT-SNA), were accelerated by PACAP injection. In contrast, injecting PACAP into 3CV significantly suppressed parasympathetic nerve activities, including gastric vagal nerve activity (GVNA) and celiac vagal nerve activity (CVNA). In addition, blood glucose elevations induced by stress, such as immobilization or ether exposure, were disrupted in PACAP-/- mice, although basal glucose levels in mutants were comparable to that in wild-type mice. These results suggest that CNS PACAP regulates autonomic function by maintaining a sympathetic-parasympathetic balance and contributes to peripheral homeostatic maintenance, especially under conditions of stress. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.


Kubomura D.,Yaizu Suisankagaku Industry Co. | Matahira Y.,Yaizu Suisankagaku Industry Co. | Nagai K.,Osaka University | Nagai K.,ANBAS Corporation | Niijima A.,Niigata University
Nutritional Neuroscience | Year: 2010

Anserine and L-carnosine are similar dipeptides synthesized by muscles of vertebrates. The functional role of anserine is unknown, although previous studies showed hypoglycemic effects of carnosine through autonomic nerves. Thus, we evaluated the effects of anserine on blood glucose levels and the neural activities. Intraperitoneal administration of specific doses of anserine to hyperglycemic rats reduced hyperglycemia and plasma glucagon concentrations, whereas thioperamide eliminated the effects of anserine. Intraduodenal injection of 0.1 mg anserine to anesthetized rats after laparotomy suppressed sympathetic nerve activity and enhanced activity of the vagal gastric efferent. In addition, oral administration of anserine reduced blood glucose levels during oral glucose tolerance testing in humans. These results suggest the possibility that anserine might be a control factor for the blood glucose, and that histaminergic nerves may be involved in the hypoglycemic effects of anserine. © 2010 W. S. Maney & Son Ltd.


Nagai K.,ANBAS Corporation | Nagai K.,Osaka University | Niijima A.,Niigata University | Horii Y.,ANBAS Corporation | And 4 more authors.
Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic and Clinical | Year: 2014

This review summarizes the effects of olfactory stimulation with grapefruit and lavender oils on autonomic nerve activity and physiological function. Olfactory stimulation with the scent of grapefruit oil (GFO) increases the activity of sympathetic nerves that innervate white and brown adipose tissues, the adrenal glands, and the kidneys, decreases the activity of the gastric vagal nerve in rats and mice. This results in an increase in lipolysis, thermogenesis, and blood pressure, and a decrease in food intake. Olfactory stimulation with the scent of lavender oil (LVO) elicits the opposite changes in nerve activity and physiological variables. Olfactory stimulation with scent of limonene, a component of GFO, and linalool, a component of LVO, has similar effects to stimulation with GFO and LVO, respectively. The histamine H1-receptor antagonist, diphenhydramine, abolishes all GFO-induced changes in nerve activity and physiological variables, and the hitstamine H3-receptor antagonist, thioperamide, eliminates all LVO-induced changes. Lesions to the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus and anosmic treatment with ZnSO4 also abolish all GFO- and LVO-induced changes. These findings indicate that limonene and linalool might be the active substances in GFO and LVO, and suggest that the suprachiasmatic nucleus and histamine are involved in mediating the GFO- and LVO-induced changes in nerve activity and physiological variables. © 2014 Elsevier B.V.


Horii Y.,ANBAS Corporation | Fujisaki Y.,ANBAS Corporation | Fuyuki R.,ANBAS Corporation | Nagai K.,ANBAS Corporation | Nagai K.,Osaka University
Neuroscience Letters | Year: 2015

L-Carnosine is synthesized in mammalian muscles and brain and affects autonomic neurotransmission and physiological phenomena. To clarify the role of l-carnosine, the effects of intraduodenal administration of l-carnosine on muscle sympathetic nerve activity (muscle-SNA) and blood flow (BF) were examined. The changes in muscle-SNA and BF were examined using electrophysiological and Doppler flowmeter in urethane-anesthetized rats. The effect of propranolol, a β-adrenergic antagonist, on the increase in muscle BF due to l-carnosine was also examined. Low dose (1. μg/300. g body weight [bw]) of l-carnosine increased both muscle-SNA and muscle BF, while high dese (100. mg/300. g bw) of l-carnosine decreased both muscle-SNA and muscle BF. Furthermore, propranolol eliminated the increase in muscle BF caused by a low dose of l-carnosine. These results suggest that l-carnosine has dose-dependent effects on muscle BF via changes in muscle-SNA, and the β-adrenergic receptor is implicated in the increase in muscle BF due to l-carnosine. © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.


PubMed | Osaka University and ANBAS Corporation
Type: | Journal: Neuroscience letters | Year: 2015

L-Carnosine is synthesized in mammalian muscles and brain and affects autonomic neurotransmission and physiological phenomena. To clarify the role of l-carnosine, the effects of intraduodenal administration of l-carnosine on muscle sympathetic nerve activity (muscle-SNA) and blood flow (BF) were examined. The changes in muscle-SNA and BF were examined using electrophysiological and Doppler flowmeter in urethane-anesthetized rats. The effect of propranolol, a -adrenergic antagonist, on the increase in muscle BF due to l-carnosine was also examined. Low dose (1g/300g body weight [bw]) of l-carnosine increased both muscle-SNA and muscle BF, while high dese (100mg/300g bw) of l-carnosine decreased both muscle-SNA and muscle BF. Furthermore, propranolol eliminated the increase in muscle BF caused by a low dose of l-carnosine. These results suggest that l-carnosine has dose-dependent effects on muscle BF via changes in muscle-SNA, and the -adrenergic receptor is implicated in the increase in muscle BF due to l-carnosine.


PubMed | KIRIN Company and ANBAS Corporation
Type: Journal Article | Journal: PloS one | Year: 2015

Obesity is the principal symptom of metabolic syndrome, which refers to a group of risk factors that increase the likelihood of atherosclerosis. In recent decades there has been a sharp rise in the incidence of obesity throughout the developed world. Iso--acids, the bitter compounds derived from hops in beer, have been shown to prevent diet-induced obesity by increasing lipid oxidation in the liver and inhibition of lipid absorption from the intestine. Whereas the sharp bitterness induced by effective dose of iso--acids precludes their acceptance as a nutrient, matured hop bittering components (MHB) appear to be more agreeable. Therefore, we tested MHB for an effect on ameliorating diet-induced body fat accumulation in rodents. MHB ingestion had a beneficial effect but, compared to iso--acids and despite containing structurally similar compounds, acted via different mechanisms to reduce body fat accumulation. MHB supplementation significantly reduced body weight gain, epididymal white adipose tissue weight, and plasma non-esterified free fatty acid levels in diet-induced obese mice. We also found that uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) expression in brown adipose tissue (BAT) was significantly increased in MHB-fed mice at both the mRNA and protein levels. In addition, MHB administration in rats induced the -adrenergic signaling cascade, which is related to cAMP accumulation in BAT, suggesting that MHB could modulate sympathetic nerve activity innervating BAT (BAT-SNA). Indeed, single oral administration of MHB elevated BAT-SNA in rats, and this elevation was dissipated by subdiaphragmatic vagotomy. Single oral administration of MHB maintained BAT temperature at a significantly higher level than in control rats. Taken together, these findings indicate that MHB ameliorates diet-induced body fat accumulation, at least partly, by enhancing thermogenesis in BAT via BAT-SNA activation. Our data suggests that MHB is a useful tool for developing functional foods or beverages to counteract the accumulation of body fat.


Horii Y.,ANBAS Corporation | Tanida M.,ANBAS Corporation | Shen J.,ANBAS Corporation | Hirata T.,Kobayashi Pharmaceutical Co. | And 3 more authors.
Neuroscience Letters | Year: 2010

Eucommia ulmoides Oliver leaf extracts (ELE) have been shown to exert a hypolipidemic effect in hamsters. Therefore, it was hypothesized that ELE might affect lipid metabolism via changes in autonomic nerve activities and causes changes in thermogenesis and body weight. We examined this hypothesis, and found that intraduodenal (ID) injection of ELE elevated epididymal white adipose tissue sympathetic nerve activity (WAT-SNA) and interscapular brown adipose tissue sympathetic nerve activity (BAT-SNA) in urethane-anesthetized rats and elevated the plasma concentration of free fatty acids (FFA) (a marker of lipolysis) and body temperature (BT) (a marker of thermogenesis) in conscious rats. Furthermore, it was observed that ID administration of ELE decreased gastric vagal nerve activity (GVNA) in urethane-anesthetized rats, and that ELE given as food reduced food intake, body and abdominal adipose tissue weights and decreased plasma triglyceride level. These findings suggest that ELE stimulates lipolysis and thermogenesis through elevations in WAT-SNA and BAT-SNA, respectively, suppresses appetite by inhibiting the activities of the parasympathetic nerves innervating the gastrointestinal tract, including GVNA, and decreases the amount of abdominal fat and body weight via these changes. © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

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