Unit of Anatomic Pathology

Palermo, Italy

Unit of Anatomic Pathology

Palermo, Italy

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Sgouros D.,National and Kapodistrian University of Athens | Piana S.,Unit of Anatomic Pathology | Argenziano G.,Dermatology and Skin Cancer Unit | Longo C.,Dermatology and Skin Cancer Unit | And 5 more authors.
Dermatology | Year: 2013

Background: Eccrine poroma (EP) belongs to the group of benign adnexal tumors, but cases of eccrine porocarcinoma (EPC) arising on long-standing and untreated EP suggest a certain risk of malignant transformation. Objectives: To describe the clinical, dermoscopic and histopathologic features associated with different extremes in the spectrum of eccrine poroid neoplasms and to review the according literature. Methods: A retrospective analysis of patient characteristics and morphologic features associated with EP, EPC in situ and invasive porocarcinoma patients who attended two skin lesion clinics in Italy and Turkey between 2010 and 2011. Results: A total of 4 cases including 1 EP, 1 EPC in situ and 2 cases of invasive EPC in 4 patients were analyzed. Recent changes including bleeding, ulceration and sudden enlargement of a pre-existing lesion were associated with malignant transformation. Dermoscopically, polymorphous vessels consisting of coiled, hairpin and linear vessels were seen at all stages of progression. Histopathological findings of EPC in situ were limited to the epidermal component and were evident only at higher magnification. Conclusions: Clinicians and pathologists should carefully evaluate EPs with a recent history of change and erosion in order to avoid overlooking the potential development of EPC. © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.


Konstantinova A.M.,Saint Petersburg State University | Michal M.,Charles University | Michal M.,Bioptical Laboratory | Kacerovska D.,Charles University | And 16 more authors.
American Journal of Dermatopathology | Year: 2016

Hidradenoma papilliferum (HP), also known as papillary hidradenoma, is the most common benign lesion of the female anogenital area derived from anogenital mammary-like glands (AGMLG). HP can be viewed conceptually as the cutaneous counterpart of mammary intraductal papilloma. The authors have studied 264 cases of HP, detailing various changes in the tumor and adjacent AGMLG, with emphasis on mammary-type alterations. In many HP, the authors noticed changes typical for benign breast lesions, such as sclerosing adenosis-like changes, usual, and atypical ductal hyperplasia. Almost in a third of cases, remnants of AGMLG adjacent to the lesion were evident, manifesting columnar changes reminiscent of those seen in breast lesions. This study shows that the histopathological changes in HP run a broad spectrum comparable with that in the mammary counterpart and benign breast disease. © 2016 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc.


Fabbri C.,AUSL Bologna Bellaria Maggiore Hospital | Luigiano C.,Unit of Gastroenterology and Digestive Endoscopy | Maimone A.,AUSL Bologna Bellaria Maggiore Hospital | Maimone A.,University of Ferrara | And 9 more authors.
Surgical Endoscopy and Other Interventional Techniques | Year: 2015

Background: Early detection of small pancreatic cancer is important because expected survival is markedly better for tumors ≤2 cm. A new endoscopic ultrasound-(EUS) guided biopsy needle with side fenestration has been recently developed to enable fine-needle biopsy (FNB) under EUS guidance. The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of EUS–FNB using a 22-gauge ProCore needle in solid pancreatic lesions ≤2 cm, in terms of diagnostic accuracy and yield. Methods: From January 2011 to December 2012, all consecutive EUS-guided tissue sampling of small pancreatic lesions (≤2 cm) were performed using 22-gauge ProCore needles; the data of these patients were analyzed retrospectively. Results: Sixty-eight patients with a mean age of 65.7 years were included. The mean lesion size was 16.5 mm (range 5–20). None of the patients developed complications. On pathological examination, the tissue retrieved was judged adequate in 58 out of 68 cases (85.3 %) and the presence of a tissue core was recorded in 36 out of 68 cases (52.9 %). The overall sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy were 80, 100, 100, 40, and 82 %, respectively. Conclusion: Our results suggested that EUS–FNB of small pancreatic lesions using a 22-gauge ProCore needle is effective and safe, and supports our hypothesis that EUS–FNB is highly useful in establishing the nature of small pancreatic lesions. © 2014, Springer Science+Business Media New York.


Sangoi A.R.,Stanford University | Sangoi A.R.,El Camino Hospital | Beck A.H.,Stanford University | Amin M.B.,Cedars Sinai Medical Center | And 13 more authors.
American Journal of Surgical Pathology | Year: 2010

Invasive micropapillary carcinoma (IMPC) of the urinary tract is a well-described variant of the urothelial carcinoma with aggressive clinical behavior. Recent studies have proposed that patients with IMPC on transurethral resection should be treated with radical cystectomy regardless of the pathologic stage. Despite the potentially important therapeutic implications of this diagnosis, interobserver variation in the diagnosis of IMPC has not been studied. Sixty digital images, each from hematoxylin and eosin-stained slides, representing 30 invasive urothelial carcinomas (2 images per case), were distributed to 14 genitourinary subspecialists and each pathologist was requested to classify cases as IMPC or not. These cases included "classic" IMPC (n=10) and urothelial carcinoma with retraction and variably sized nests that might potentially be regarded as IMPC (n=20). The following 13 morphologic features were recorded as positive/negative for all cases independent of the reviewers' diagnoses: columnar cells, elongate nests or processes, extensive stromal retraction, lumen formation with internal epithelial tufting, epithelial ring forms, intracytoplasmic vacuolization, multiple nests within the same lacunar space, back-to-back lacunar spaces, epithelial nest anastomosis/confluence, marked nuclear pleomorphism, peripherally oriented nuclei, randomly distributed nuclei, and tumor nest size. In addition, a mean tumor nest size was calculated for each image based on the number of nuclei spanning the width of the nests. Interobserver reproducibility was assessed and the morphologic features were correlated with the classic IMPC and nonclassic/potential IMPC groups. In addition, the relationships between morphologic features, pathologists' interpretations, and case type (classic IMPC vs. nonclassic/potential IMPC) were evaluated using unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis. Interobserver reproducibility for a diagnosis of IMPC in the 30 study cases was moderate (κ: 0.54). Although classification as IMPC among the 10 "classic" IMPC cases was relatively uniform (93% agreement), the classification in the subset of 20 invasive urothelial carcinomas with extensive retraction and varying sized tumor nests was more variable. Multiple nests within the same lacunar space had the highest association with a diagnosis of classic IMPC. These findings suggest that more study of IMPC is needed to identify the individual pathologic features that might potentially correlate with an aggressive outcome and response to intravesical therapy. © 2010 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.


Piana S.,Unit of Anatomic Pathology | Ragazzi M.,Unit of Anatomic Pathology | Zalaudek I.,Dermatology and Skin Cancer Unit | Zalaudek I.,Medical University of Graz | Argenziano G.,Medical University of Graz
Australasian Journal of Dermatology | Year: 2013

Combined tumours are often a serendipitous finding. Among the spectrum of melanocytic tumours, the co-existence of different cell populations of the same linage is a well-recognised phenomenon. Less commonly documented, but still well documented is the event of a melanocytic tumour in collision with an epithelial benign or malignant neoplasm. Exceptionally infrequent is however the collision of a Spitz naevus with an epithelial tumour. Here we report the clinical-dermoscopic and histopathological findings of a Spitz naevus occurring in collision with a syringoma. © 2012 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.


D'Antonio A.,Unit of Anatomic Pathology | Addesso M.,Unit of Anatomic Pathology | Caleo A.,Unit of Anatomic Pathology | Altieri R.,Unit of Anatomic Pathology | Boscaino A.,Unit of Anatomic Pathology
Cutis | Year: 2014

Malignant glomus tumors (GTs) are rare, and diagnosis requires consideration of specific histologic criteria. Glomus tumors that do not fulfill the histologic criteria for malignancy but show at least 1 feature other than nuclear atypia should be classified as GTs of uncertain malignant potential (GTUMPs). We report the case of a 74-year-old man with a slowly progressing, painful, 2.5-cm nodule on the forehead that was successfully treated via wide surgical excision and was later diagnosed as a GTUMP. Three-year follow-up showed no local recurrence or distant metastasis. Malignant GTs and GTUMPs are rare, and the nomenclature and classification of these tumors is controversial. These findings and the difficulty of differential diagnosis in a continuum between benignity and malignancy prompted our report.


PubMed | Unit of Anatomic Pathology
Type: Case Reports | Journal: Cutis | Year: 2014

Malignant glomus tumors (GTs) are rare, and diagnosis requires consideration of specific histologic criteria. Glomus tumors that do not fulfill the histologic criteria for malignancy but show at least 1 feature other than nuclear atypia should be classified as GTs of uncertain malignant potential (GTUMPs). We report the case of a 74-year-old man with a slowly progressing, painful, 2.5-cm nodule on the forehead that was successfully treated via wide surgical excision and was later diagnosed as a GTUMP. Three-year follow-up showed no local recurrence or distant metastasis. Malignant GTs and GTUMPs are rare, and the nomenclature and classification of these tumors is controversial. These findings and the difficulty of differential diagnosis in a continuum between benignity and malignancy prompted our report.


Barresi V.,Messina University | Reggiani Bonetti L.,University of Modena and Reggio Emilia | Domati F.,University of Modena and Reggio Emilia | Baron L.,Unit of Anatomic Pathology
Virchows Archiv | Year: 2016

Signet ring cell carcinoma (SRCC) is a rare variant of colorectal cancer (CRC), by definition composed of at least 50 % of neoplastic cells showing signet ring cell morphology. Colorectal SRCC is mainly characterized by aggressive clinical behavior, high pTNM stage and microsatellite instability (MSI). We assessed the prognostic value of several histopathological parameters (histological grade, venous invasion, lymphovascular invasion, MSI, mucin content, tumour budding, pTNM stage) in terms of disease free survival (DFS) and cancer specific survival (CSS) in a series of 32 SRCCs. We confirm that pTNM stage at diagnosis is relevant for predicting DFS and CSS in SRCC. In addition, we show on haematoxylin and eosin or immunohistochemically stained (CD34, podoplanin) sections that venous invasion and lymphovascular invasion are significantly associated with shorter DFS and CSS in SRCC. Notably, venous invasion assed by immunohistochemistry had the highest risk ratio and proved to be the only independent prognostic variable. Finally, we show that histological grade, as assessed on the percentage of formed glands, has prognostic relevance in SRCC as high-grade tumours (<50 % of glands) had significantly shorter CSS compared to low-grade tumours. This remained an independent variable at multivariate analysis. If our findings are confirmed in further studies, venous invasion as assessed by immunohistochemistry and histological Tgrade might be added to guidelines for SRCC reporting as significant prognostic factors. © 2016 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg


PubMed | Unit of Anatomic Pathology
Type: Case Reports | Journal: The Australasian journal of dermatology | Year: 2013

Combined tumours are often a serendipitous finding. Among the spectrum of melanocytic tumours, the co-existence of different cell populations of the same lineage is a well-recognised phenomenon. Less commonly documented, but still well documented is the event of a melanocytic tumour in collision with an epithelial benign or malignant neoplasm. Exceptionally infrequent is however the collision of a Spitz naevus with an epithelial tumour. Here we report the clinical-dermoscopic and histopathological findings of a Spitz naevus occurring in collision with a syringoma.

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