Anan Central Hospital of the Medical Association

Anan, Japan

Anan Central Hospital of the Medical Association

Anan, Japan
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Soeki T.,Tokushima University | Koshiba K.,Anan Central Hospital of the Medical Association | Niki T.,Shikoku Medical Center for Children and Adults | Kusunose K.,Tokushima University | And 8 more authors.
Peptides | Year: 2014

Ghrelin is a novel growth hormone (GH)-releasing peptide originally isolated from the stomach. Recently, we have shown that ghrelin suppresses cardiac sympathetic activity and prevents early left ventricular remodeling in rats with myocardial infarction. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of ghrelin on autonomic nerve activity in healthy human subjects. An intravenous bolus of human synthetic ghrelin (10 μg/kg) was administered to 10 healthy men (mean age, 33 years). Holter monitoring assessment was performed before and during 2 h after the ghrelin therapy. The standard deviation of normal RR intervals (SDNN), square root of the mean of the sum of the squares of differences between adjacent RR intervals (rMSSD), high-frequency power (HF), and low-frequency power (LF) were analyzed. Blood samples were also obtained before and after the therapy. A single administration of ghrelin decreased both heart rate and blood pressure. Interestingly, ghrelin significantly decreased the LF and LF/HF ratio of heart rate variability and increased the SDNN, rMSSD, and HF. Ghrelin also elicited a marked increase in circulating GH, but not insulin-like growth factor-1. These data suggest that ghrelin might suppress cardiac sympathetic nerve activity and stimulate cardiac parasympathetic nerve activity. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.


PubMed | Shikoku Medical Center for Children and Adults, Anan Central Hospital of the Medical Association, Japan National Cardiovascular Center Research Institute and Tokushima University
Type: | Journal: Peptides | Year: 2014

Ghrelin is a novel growth hormone (GH)-releasing peptide originally isolated from the stomach. Recently, we have shown that ghrelin suppresses cardiac sympathetic activity and prevents early left ventricular remodeling in rats with myocardial infarction. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of ghrelin on autonomic nerve activity in healthy human subjects. An intravenous bolus of human synthetic ghrelin (10g/kg) was administered to 10 healthy men (mean age, 33 years). Holter monitoring assessment was performed before and during 2h after the ghrelin therapy. The standard deviation of normal RR intervals (SDNN), square root of the mean of the sum of the squares of differences between adjacent RR intervals (rMSSD), high-frequency power (HF), and low-frequency power (LF) were analyzed. Blood samples were also obtained before and after the therapy. A single administration of ghrelin decreased both heart rate and blood pressure. Interestingly, ghrelin significantly decreased the LF and LF/HF ratio of heart rate variability and increased the SDNN, rMSSD, and HF. Ghrelin also elicited a marked increase in circulating GH, but not insulin-like growth factor-1. These data suggest that ghrelin might suppress cardiac sympathetic nerve activity and stimulate cardiac parasympathetic nerve activity.


Nishino T.,Anan Central Hospital of the Medical Association | Katayama K.,Anan Central Hospital of the Medical Association | Takahashi Y.,Anan Central Hospital of the Medical Association | Tanaka T.,Anan Central Hospital of the Medical Association
Japanese Journal of Cancer and Chemotherapy | Year: 2012

A 69-year-old man visited our hospital because of melena and anemia. Colonoscopy revealed a type 3 tumor at sigmoid colon, and by abdominal CT, we detected a sigmoid colon cancer invading the urinary bladder with a single liver metastasis. The patient required sigmoidectomy with partial hepatectomy and total urinary bladder resection. Preoperative chemotherapy with mFOLFOX6 was initiated as a part of multidisciplinary therapy. After the 6th course was completed, CT revealed a reduction in the primary tumor's size and the disappearance of liver metastasis. After the 8th course was completed, we performed urinary bladder conserving sigmoidectomy. The pathological diagnosis of the surgical specimen was tub1, pSS, ly0, v0, pN0, and pStage II. Down-sizing chemotherapy might improve the quality of life (QOL) of colon cancer patients with extensive invasion of the urinary bladder.


Yoshioka S.,Tokushima University | Hamada Y.,Health Insurance Naruto Hospital | Takata S.,Tokushima University | Takai H.,Anan Central Hospital of the Medical Association | Yasui N.,Tokushima University
Hand | Year: 2010

We describe a patient in which an osteochondroma, which resulted from hereditary multiple exostoses, limited flexion of the proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint at birth. The tumor grew over the original distal head of the proximal phalanx, and the early appearance of a second ossification center on the base of the middle phalanx was observed. The mass was removed surgically when the patient was 17 months old. There was an improvement in the range of motion at a follow-up evaluation 3 years later. The tumor shape and the growth of the affected PIP joint are examined in detail. © 2009 American Association for Hand Surgery.


Omoya T.,Anan Central Hospital of the Medical Association | Shiba M.,Anan Central Hospital of the Medical Association | Hibino S.,Hibino Hospital | Aoki R.,Tokushima Health Screening Center | And 3 more authors.
Clinical Journal of Gastroenterology | Year: 2013

We describe a case of lower abdominal pain caused by a twig tea impaction at the rectosigmoid junction after inadvertent ingestion. The foreign body was detected and successfully dislodged from the colonic wall with grasping forceps during colonoscopy. The post-procedural course was uneventful, and the patient was discharged 10 days after the removal. Colonic injury, including perforation due to foreign body ingestion, must be considered in patients presenting with unexplained symptoms and findings, even when they do not recall any foreign body ingestion. © Springer 2013.

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