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Wilmington, NC, United States

Analytical Perspectives

Wilmington, NC, United States

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News Article | May 21, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

In this photo taken May 19, 2017, a GPO worker stacks copies of "Analytical Perspectives Budget of the U.S. Government Fiscal Year 2018" onto a pallet at the U.S. Government Publishing Office's (GPO) plant in Washington. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster) WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump's budget hasn't been released yet, but that's not stopping some of Capitol Hill's most important Republicans from giving it a cold shoulder. Trump's blueprint for the 2018 budget year comes out Tuesday, and it's certain to include a wave of cuts to benefit programs such as Medicaid, food stamps, federal employee pensions and farm subsidies. The fleshed-out proposal follows up on an unpopular partial release in March that targeted the budgets of domestic agencies and foreign aid for cuts averaging 10 percent — and made lawmakers in both parties recoil. The new cuts are unpopular as well. "We think it's wrongheaded," said Rep. Mike Conaway, chairman of the House Agriculture Committee, when asked about looming cuts to farm programs. "Production agriculture is in the worst slump since the depression — 50 percent drop in the net income for producers. They need this safety net," said Conaway, R-Texas. Trump's budget plan promises to balance the federal ledger by the end of a 10-year window, even while exempting Social Security and Medicare retirement benefits from cuts. To achieve balance, the plan by White House budget director Mick Mulvaney relies on optimistic estimates of economic growth, and the surge in revenues that would result, while abandoning Trump's promise of a "massive tax cut." Instead, the Trump tax plan promises an overhaul that would cut tax rates but rely on erasing tax breaks and economic growth to end up as "revenue neutral." For more news videos visit Yahoo View, available on iOS and Android. Trump is also targeting the Medicaid health program that provides care to the poor and disabled, and nursing home care to millions of older people who could not otherwise afford it. The House had a bitter debate on health care before a razor-thin 217-213 passage in early May of a GOP health bill that included more than $800 billion in Medicaid cuts over the coming decade. Key Republicans are not interested in another round of cuts to the program. "I would think that the health care bill is our best policy statement on Medicaid going forward," said Rep. Greg Walden, R-Ore., chairman of the House Energy and Commerce Committee, which has jurisdiction over the program. Details on Trump's budget will not be publicly released until Tuesday, but Mulvaney has briefed Republicans about what's coming and his staff has provided targeted leaks to the media. Trump's full budget submission to Congress is months overdue and follows the release two months ago of an outline for the discretionary portion of the budget, covering defense, education, foreign aid, housing, and environmental programs, among others. Their budgets pass each year through annual appropriations bills. Trump's earlier blueprint proposed a $54 billion, 10 percent increase for the military above an existing cap on Pentagon spending, financed by an equal cut to nondefense programs. Those cuts rang alarm bells for many Republicans, who were particularly upset about proposals to eliminate community development block grants, slash medical research and eviscerate foreign aid. Trump's GOP allies rejected such cuts when wrapping up long-overdue legislation for the current budget year, which ends Sept. 30. There's little sign they will have a change of heart now, especially with Trump's administration in turmoil and his poll ratings at historic lows. "The budget's a starting point. We'll go to work from there," said Sen. John Hoeven, R-N.D., a member of the Senate Appropriations Committee. Republicans controlling Congress have delayed action on their companion budget measure, waiting for Trump to go first. This year's budget debate, Republicans hope, would grease the way for a major overhaul of the loophole-cluttered tax system. But House conservatives also want to embark on a round of cuts to benefit programs and are open to Trump's suggestions for cuts to mandatory programs such as federal employee pensions. Presidential budgets are mere suggestions, and the White House has discretion to assume higher economic growth rates of up to 3 percent or so under Trump's agenda of tax changes, loosened regulations and infrastructure spending. Tuesday's budget will also include proposals such as paid leave for parents after the birth or adoption of a child, a $200 billion infrastructure plan that Trump officials claim could leverage, along with private investment, up to $1 trillion in construction projects, and funding for Trump's oft-promised wall along the U.S.-Mexico border.


News Article | May 22, 2017
Site: news.yahoo.com

In this photo taken May 19, 2017, a GPO worker stacks copies of "Analytical Perspectives Budget of the U.S. Government Fiscal Year 2018" onto a pallet at the U.S. Government Publishing Office's (GPO) plant in Washington. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster) WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on the Trump budget proposal (all times local): People familiar with the plan say that includes cuts to pensions for federal workers and higher contributions toward those pension benefits. Also targeted for cuts are refundable tax credits paid to the working poor. Those familiar with the plan are not authorized to discuss it by name and request anonymity. The budget expected to be rolled out Tuesday would drive millions of people off of food stamps. The food stamp cuts would total more than 25 percent over a decade. Also facing cuts are benefit programs such as Medicaid, federal employee pensions, welfare benefits and farm subsidies. President Donald Trump's budget would drive millions of people off of food stamps, just one part of a new wave of spending cut proposals. The Trump plan would slice a whopping $193 billion from food stamps over the coming decade, a cut of more than 25 percent. The White House says it would be implemented by cutting back eligibility and imposing additional work requirements. The program presently serves about 42 million people. Trump's blueprint for the 2018 budget year comes out Tuesday. It includes a wave of cuts to benefit programs such as Medicaid, federal employee pensions, welfare benefits, and farm subsidies. The overall plan from the White House is already getting panned by congressional lawmakers in both parties. President Donald Trump's budget hasn't been released yet, but that's not stopping some of Capitol Hill's most important Republicans from giving it a cold shoulder. Trump's blueprint for the 2018 budget year comes out Tuesday. It's certain to include a wave of cuts to benefit programs such as Medicaid, food stamps, federal employee pensions and farm subsidies. The fleshed-out proposal follows up on an unpopular partial release in March that targeted the budgets of domestic agencies and foreign aid for cuts averaging 10 percent — and made lawmakers in both parties recoil. The new cuts are unpopular as well. Trump's budget plan promises to balance the federal ledger by the end of a 10-year window, even while exempting Social Security and Medicare retirement benefits from cuts.


Tondeur Y.,Analytical Perspectives | Nestrick T.,4520 Washington Street | Vining B.,Analytical Perspectives | Hart J.,Analytical Perspectives
Chemosphere | Year: 2010

A method for the determination of all polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin (PCDDs) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs), and hexachlorobenzene (HCB) contained in production batches of pentachlorophenol (PCP) samples is presented. The method uses two sub-samples of the PCP sample to provide an effective dynamic range of 1:40,000,000. Following extraction of the samples and fractionation of the sample extracts, the extracts are analyzed by HRGC/HRMS, and the resulting data from both sub-samples are combined to generate the final data for each sample. Data from the analysis of 47 samples using this method are presented and show a ratio of concentrations of octachlorinated dibenzofuran (OCDF) to 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorinated dibenzofuran (TCDF) of approximately 4,000,000:1. The results show that four congeners dominate the ITEQ, which has an average value of 634μgkg-1 (429μgkg-1 WHO 2005 TEQ) in those samples. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.


Tondeur Y.,Analytical Perspectives | Vining B.,Analytical Perspectives | Mace K.,Analytical Perspectives | Mills W.,Mills Consulting Inc. | Hart J.,Analytical Perspectives
Chemosphere | Year: 2012

In late 1990s, USEPA/FDA made an important connection regarding the presence of elevated levels of dioxins (e.g., 1500ngkg -1 TEQ) in ball clays mined in Mississippi (USA) from a geological deposit dated to ∼40million years (Mississippi Embayment) that stretches over several states (northern part of Mississippi to Kentucky) and levels of dioxins in selected animal food sources. Following a recent beach nourishment program along the mid-Atlantic coast of the US, a number of dark gray, blue tinted nuggets of varying sizes were found on beach strands and near the shoreline. Using the presence of these balls of clay (shape, color, and knowledge regarding their use in pottery) on the beach, together with our direct experience analyzing ball clays for dioxins, we made a possible association between these clays and elevated dioxins. Concerns regarding the potential of nourishment programs to cause severe damage to our beaches drove us to test the dioxin content of nourishment exposed clays. A number of the nuggets, along with freshly dredged and deposited sand (collected the morning after nourishment) with the same coloration, and others (sun-bleached), collected approximately 2weeks after the completion of the nourishment efforts, were analyzed for the presence of PCDD/Fs, PCBs, and selected semi-volatile chlorinated organics. The clay PCDD/F WHO2005-TEQs (dry weight; ND=DL; EMPC=EMPC) ranged from 0.41 to 5.78ngkg -1 with an average of 2.64ngkg -1, whereas the sand sample's TEQs ranged from 0.18 to 0.31ngkg -1 PCDD/F WHO-2005, with an average of 0.22ngkg -1. The average total tetra- through octachlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin concentration was 2700ngkg -1 (with a maximum of 5800ngkg -1) for the clays and 8.5ngkg -1 (with a maximum of 16.8ngkg -1) for the sand samples. The congener 2,3,7,8-TCDD (TEF=1) was detected in half of the clay samples (0.11-0.77ngkg -1). All of the clay and sand samples displayed an unambiguous and dominating 1,4,6,9-chlorination pattern across homolog groups. No other chlorinated aromatics were detected above background levels. The observations, along with the absence or an extremely low level of polychlorinated dibenzofurans, together with the mineralogical analysis, supports the conclusion that off-shore dredging activities are reaching reservoir sources containing dioxin-tainted, smectic/kaolinite clay minerals. Subsequent beach erosion provides additional environmental releases over time, as buried balls of clay from previous nourishment efforts become exposed. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.


PubMed | Analytical Perspectives
Type: Journal Article | Journal: Chemosphere | Year: 2012

In late 1990s, USEPA/FDA made an important connection regarding the presence of elevated levels of dioxins (e.g., 1500 ng kg(-1) TEQ) in ball clays mined in Mississippi (USA) from a geological deposit dated to ~40 million years (Mississippi Embayment) that stretches over several states (northern part of Mississippi to Kentucky) and levels of dioxins in selected animal food sources. Following a recent beach nourishment program along the mid-Atlantic coast of the US, a number of dark gray, blue tinted nuggets of varying sizes were found on beach strands and near the shoreline. Using the presence of these balls of clay (shape, color, and knowledge regarding their use in pottery) on the beach, together with our direct experience analyzing ball clays for dioxins, we made a possible association between these clays and elevated dioxins. Concerns regarding the potential of nourishment programs to cause severe damage to our beaches drove us to test the dioxin content of nourishment exposed clays. A number of the nuggets, along with freshly dredged and deposited sand (collected the morning after nourishment) with the same coloration, and others (sun-bleached), collected approximately 2 weeks after the completion of the nourishment efforts, were analyzed for the presence of PCDD/Fs, PCBs, and selected semi-volatile chlorinated organics. The clay PCDD/F WHO2005-TEQs (dry weight; ND=DL; EMPC=EMPC) ranged from 0.41 to 5.78 ng kg(-1) with an average of 2.64 ng kg(-1), whereas the sand samples TEQs ranged from 0.18 to 0.31 ng kg(-1) PCDD/F WHO-2005, with an average of 0.22 ng kg(-1). The average total tetra- through octachlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin concentration was 2700 ng kg(-1) (with a maximum of 5800 ng kg(-1)) for the clays and 8.5 ng kg(-1) (with a maximum of 16.8 ng kg(-1)) for the sand samples. The congener 2,3,7,8-TCDD (TEF=1) was detected in half of the clay samples (0.11-0.77 ng kg(-1)). All of the clay and sand samples displayed an unambiguous and dominating 1,4,6,9-chlorination pattern across homolog groups. No other chlorinated aromatics were detected above background levels. The observations, along with the absence or an extremely low level of polychlorinated dibenzofurans, together with the mineralogical analysis, supports the conclusion that off-shore dredging activities are reaching reservoir sources containing dioxin-tainted, smectic/kaolinite clay minerals. Subsequent beach erosion provides additional environmental releases over time, as buried balls of clay from previous nourishment efforts become exposed.

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