Hampton, VA, United States

Time filter

Source Type

Grant
Agency: Department of Defense | Branch: Air Force | Program: STTR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 100.00K | Year: 2010

We propose to investigate the feasibility of obtaining fast and accurate trajectories using global geopotential models representing departures from the two-body plus J2 terms. The proposed geopotential formulations and numerical integration methods rely on multi-core processors and the emerging massive parallel capabilities of Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) available to common personal computers. Two approaches of modeling the geopotential are proposed. 1) Finite Element Approach: modernize existing finite element models of the geopotential and trade memory for computational speed through the interpolation of a pre-computed mesh. 2) Mascon Approach: model thousands of mascons within the Earth and tap into the fine-grained parallelism of the affordable and commonly available GPUs. Integration of equations of motion will be performed using parallel explicit and implicit methods as well as modern energy preserving (symplectic) techniques that are ideally suited for conservative problems such as the non-spherical earth. The deliverables of Phase I will be prototype geopotential models and example simulations of high-fidelity trajectories which can ultimately be moved into operations to benefit a wide variety of SSA activities. Using a single desktop computer, we target simulation speed improvements of two orders of magnitude compared to conventional geopotential formulations and serial approaches. BENEFIT: It is anticipated that parts of the proposed research will achieve two orders of magnitude improvement in gravitational acceleration calculation. The parallel implementation and fast integration schemes will further improve trajectory calculation speed, which will benefit the Air Force SSA activities and a wide range of other industries. The commercial applications of the proposed research will involve sales of software and services to governmental agencies and contractors such as NASA, military, aerospace corporations, and software companies supporting the earth and space science industries. Apart from the apparent spacecraft trajectory applications, the proposed computation schemes using GPUs and parallel numerical integration have a wide range of applications, including computational fluid dynamics, structural analysis, large-scale optimization, etc.


Grant
Agency: National Aeronautics and Space Administration | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 124.88K | Year: 2015

The proposed X-Boom is an innovation on rollable boom design directly relevant to NASA SBIR topic H5.01, Deployable Structures. The X-boom is a rollable Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer (CFRP) boom with an open and symmetrical cross-section. X-boom exhibits superior strength when compared to other open section state of the art (SOA) rollable booms and reduced system integration complexity when compared to both open and closed section SOA rollable booms.


Patent
Analytical Mechanics Associates, Inc. | Date: 2015-10-08

A spacecraft system may include a storage portion (e.g., a first portion and a second portion) and a solar array apparatus that may be configurable in at least a stowed configuration and a deployed configuration. The solar array apparatus may include at least one solar array to collect incident radiation when the solar array apparatus is in the deployed configuration. In one or more embodiments, the at least one solar array may extend away from the storage portion. In one or more embodiments, the at least one solar array may extend between the first portion and the second portion. The solar array apparatus may also include an extendable boom operable to extend the at least one solar array apparatus from the stowed configuration to the deployed configuration.


Patent
Analytical Mechanics Associates, Inc. | Date: 2016-05-13

Exemplary deployable sheet material systems may be configured to stow and deploy sheet material. The systems may include one or more masts, one or more extendable booms, and one or more guys wires configured to function in conjunction with each other to deploy the sheet material and then to maintain the sheet material in the deployed configuration.


Patent
Analytical Mechanics Associates, Inc. | Date: 2013-08-09

Gossamer apparatus and systems for use with spacecraft may include a deployable gossamer apparatus. The deployable gossamer apparatus may include a plurality rib members and gossamer material extending therebetween and may be configured in a stowed configuration and a deployed configuration. The rib members of the deployable gossamer apparatus store potential energy used for deployment of the deployable gossamer apparatus.


Patent
Analytical Mechanics Associates, Inc. | Date: 2014-06-03

Apparatus for deceleration of a body may include a plurality of inflatable portions. The plurality of inflatable portions may be coupled together such that, when inflated, the plurality of inflatable portions defines a deceleration structure configured to decelerate the body. Each inflatable portion may include a first wall element, a second wall element opposite the first wall element, and a plurality of stitch members extending between and coupled to each of the first wall element and the second wall element.


Grant
Agency: National Aeronautics and Space Administration | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 124.72K | Year: 2014

TRUSS is a structurally efficient solar array concept that utilizes a TRAC rollable boom and tension-stiffened structure to exceed the program requirements for very large solar arrays. TRAC provides simple strain-energy deployment with a constant cross section and constant strength along its length, improving the reliability and simplicity of array deployment. The tensioning cables allow the structure to achieve mass efficiency much improved over the government reference array (GRA). The roll-out deployment of the TRAC booms also simplifies the ground support structure needed for testing and qualification of full-size arrays, which will be animated to illustrate in-space and ground-based deployments.


Grant
Agency: National Aeronautics and Space Administration | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase II | Award Amount: 599.86K | Year: 2011

Research on desensitized optimal filtering techniques and a navigation and sensor fusion tool kit using advanced filtering techniques is proposed. Research focuses on reducing the sensitivity of Kalman filters with respect to model parameter uncertainties using a robust trajectory optimization approach called Desensitized Optimal Control, developed by the proposing company. The proposed tool kit implements the research results as well as recent advances in robust and/or adaptive generalized Kalman and Sigma-Point filters for non-Gaussian problems with uncertain error statistics.The proposed research and development brings new filtering and sensor fusion techniques to NASA and industry in a convenient package which can be used as a stand-alone toolbox, either for ground support or for onboard applications. Its modular structure enables it to be readily integrated with other tools, and thus enhances the existing fleet of applications.The desensitized optimal filtering research and the feasibility study on components of the proposed tool kit will be carried out concurrently. The tool kit is a generic stand-alone application, and has a modularized structure which facilitates easy integration with existing tools. A suite of sensor models and noise distributions as well as Monte-Carlo analysis capability are included to enable statistical performance evaluations.


Grant
Agency: National Aeronautics and Space Administration | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 124.96K | Year: 2012

Research on utilizing inexpensive and personal-level parallel computing architectures to speed up the implementation of the class of particle filters is proposed. This study will leverage NVIDIA Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) and multi-core CPUs that are quickly becoming commonly available for engineering communities. Parallelization of the Unscented Kalman filter and the bootstrap particle filter with applications in INS/GPS integration and the orbital determination problem will be the focus of the phase I research. This research will contribute to upgrading the current fleet of NASA navigation software which heavily rely on Kalman filters and EKF and are quickly becoming outdated. Over the last couple of decades, great advancement has been made in improving filter accuracy in nonlinear applications with non-Gaussian noise models. One of the advanced techniques is particle filters which, if properly applied, are more accurate than the EKF for nonlinear and non-Gaussian applications. One drawback of the particle filters is the excessive computational burden if implemented on a serial computer. However, since the majority of the computation can be carried out simultaneously, the particle filters inherently are well suited for parallel computing. The objective of the Phase I effort is to leverage GPUs and multi-core CPUs to exploit such parallelism. With the performance of these devices improving at a rapid pace, it is anticipated that they will quickly find their way to onboard avionics, and this research paves the way for implementing particle filters in real-time applications. This will bring unprecedented accuracy and applicability of particle filters to aircraft and spacecraft navigation analyses for NASA and a wide range of non-NASA applications.


Grant
Agency: National Aeronautics and Space Administration | Branch: | Program: SBIR | Phase: Phase I | Award Amount: 124.99K | Year: 2016

Research is proposed to investigate continuation methods to improve the robustness of trajectory design algorithms for spacecraft in highly perturbed dynamical environments, such as near asteroids and comets, where many traditional methods that are often used and taken for granted simply do not work. The continuation is achieved through establishing homotopies between some simple models, for which solutions are easy to obtain, and the full models. We will investigate how sensitivities of the trajectory to the homotopy parameters can be used to systematically and effectively automate the homotopy continuation, improving the robustness of the algorithms. We will also investigate adaptive fidelity models and alternative interpolation-based gravity models, as well as a number of techniques developed by the investigators to speed up the dynamics evaluations. Almost every legacy trajectory design software code used by NASA (e.g., Malto, Copernicus, EMTG, GMAT, etc.) is faced by the dilemma that hard problems simply don?t converge without a good initial guess. The gradient-based localized optimization methods used in these software tools require initial guesses that are close to the final solutions. The common practice of using solutions based on simplified models as initial guesses often do not yield convergence if the full problem is solved directly, especially in highly perturbed dynamical environments. In the proposed method, instead of taking a full step from the simple model to the full model, we systematically take smaller steps, and judiciously introduce incremental perturbations. This method is amenable to automation and yields robustness in convergence. The proposed research will greatly benefit NASA and the space trajectory design community in designing high-fidelity trajectories with true ephemerides and force fields.

Loading Analytical Mechanics Associates, Inc. collaborators
Loading Analytical Mechanics Associates, Inc. collaborators