an affiliate of Actavis Inc.

Jersey City, NJ, United States

an affiliate of Actavis Inc.

Jersey City, NJ, United States
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Boinpally R.,an affiliate of Actavis Inc. | Chen L.,an affiliate of Actavis Inc. | Zukin S.R.,an affiliate of Actavis Inc. | Zukin S.R.,Clinical Research Associates and the Simons Foundation Autism Research Initiative | And 3 more authors.
Clinical Drug Investigation | Year: 2015

Background: Combining two standard-of-care medications for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) into a single once-daily dosage unit may improve treatment adherence, facilitate drug administration, and reduce caregiver burden. A new fixed-dose combination (FDC) capsule containing 28 mg memantine extended release (ER) and 10 mg donepezil was evaluated for bioequivalence with co-administered commercially available memantine ER and donepezil, and for bioavailability with regard to food intake. Methods: Two phase I, single-dose, randomized, open-label, crossover studies were conducted in 18- to 45-year-old healthy individuals. In MDX-PK-104 study, fasting participants (N = 38) received co-administered memantine ER and donepezil or the FDC. In MDX-PK-105 study, participants (N = 36) received three treatments: intact FDC taken while fasting or after a high-fat meal, or FDC contents sprinkled on applesauce while fasting. Standard pharmacokinetic parameters for memantine and donepezil were calculated from the plasma concentration time-curve using non-compartmental analyses. Linear mixed-effects models were used to compare: (a) FDC versus co-administered individual drugs; (b) FDC fasted versus with food; and (c) FDC sprinkled on applesauce versus FDC intact, both fasted. Safety parameters were also evaluated. Results: The FDC capsule was bioequivalent to co-administered memantine ER and donepezil. There was no significant food effect on the bioavailability of the FDC components. There were no clinically relevant differences in time to maximum plasma concentration or safety profiles across treatments. Conclusions: An FDC capsule containing 28 mg memantine ER and 10 mg donepezil is bioequivalent to commercially available memantine ER and donepezil, and bioavailability is not affected by food intake or sprinkling of capsule contents on applesauce. © 2015 The Author(s)


Arnold L.M.,University of Cincinnati | Bateman L.,Fatigue Consultation Clinic | Palmer R.H.,an affiliate of Actavis Inc. | Lin Y.,an affiliate of Actavis Inc.
Pediatric Rheumatology | Year: 2015

Background: There are no approved medications for juvenile fibromyalgia (JFM), a disorder that is often under-diagnosed. The effects of milnacipran, a drug approved for the management of fibromyalgia (FM) in adults, was assessed in a clinical trial program for JFM. Methods: Patients, ages 13-17 years who met the Yunus and Masi criteria for JFM and/or 1990 American College of Rheumatology criteria for FM, were enrolled in a responder-enriched, randomized withdrawal trial. After receiving open-label milnacipran (8 weeks), patients with ≥50 % improvement in pain underwent double-blind randomization (1:2) to either placebo or continuing treatment with milnacipran (8 weeks). All patients, including those who did not meet the randomization criteria for double-blind withdrawal, were allowed to enter an extension study with open-label milnacipran (up to 52 weeks). The primary endpoint was loss of therapeutic response (LTR) during the double-blind period. Additional outcome measures included the Patient Global Impression of Severity (PGIS), Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL: Generic Core Scales, Multidimensional Fatigue Scale), and Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for Children (MASC). Safety assessments included adverse events (AEs), vital signs, electrocardiograms, and laboratory tests. Results: The milnacipran program was terminated early due to low enrollment. Because only 20 patients were randomized into the double-blind withdrawal period, statistical analyses were not conducted for the LTR endpoint. However, 116 patients entered the open-label period of the initial study and 57 participated in the open-label extension study. Their experience provides preliminary information about the use of milnacipran in JFM patients. During both open-label periods, there were mean improvements in pain severity, PGIC, PedsQL, and MASC scores. No unexpected safety issues were detected. The most commonly reported treatment-emergent AEs were nausea, headache, vomiting, and dizziness. Mean increases in heart rate and blood pressure were observed, and were consistent with the AE profile in adults with FM. Conclusions: The open-label findings provide preliminary evidence that milnacipran may improve symptoms of JFM, with a safety and tolerability profile that is consistent with the experience in adult FM patients. Future trial designs for JFM should consider the relatively low recognition of this condition compared to adult FM and the difficulties with enrollment. Trial registration: NCT01328002 ; NCT01331109 © 2015 Arnold et al.


PubMed | an affiliate of Actavis Inc, University of South Florida and Forest Research Institute
Type: Journal Article | Journal: The Journal of clinical psychiatry | Year: 2016

To evaluate the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of vilazodone as an acute treatment for generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). Vilazodone is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor and 5-HT1A receptor partial agonist approved for the treatment of major depressive disorder in adults.This was a randomized, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, multicenter, flexible-dose study conducted from May 2013-March 2014. Adult patients (18-70 years, inclusive) who met DSM-IV-TR criteria for GAD were randomized (1:1) to placebo or vilazodone 20-40 mg/d for 8 weeks of double-blind treatment. Primary and secondary efficacy parameters were change from baseline to week 8 in the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HARS) total score and in the Sheehan Disability Scale (SDS) total score, respectively, analyzed using a mixed-effects model for repeated measures approach on a modified intent-to-treat population. Safety outcomes were summarized descriptively.Efficacy analyses were based on 400 patients (placebo = 200, vilazodone = 200); 76% completed the study (placebo = 81%, vilazodone = 71%). The least squares mean difference (95% CI) in total score change from baseline to week 8 was statistically significant for vilazodone versus placebo on the HARS (-2.20 [-3.72 to -0.68]; P = .0048) and on the SDS (-1.89 [-3.52 to -0.26]; P = .0236). Treatment-emergent adverse events reported in 5% of vilazodone patients and at least twice the rate of placebo were nausea, diarrhea, dizziness, fatigue, delayed ejaculation, and erectile dysfunction.Statistically significant differences in favor of vilazodone 20-40 mg/d versus placebo were seen on all measures of anxiety and functional impairment in patients with GAD. Vilazodone was generally well tolerated, and no new safety concerns were noted.ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01844115.


Combining two standard-of-care medications for Alzheimers disease (AD) into a single once-daily dosage unit may improve treatment adherence, facilitate drug administration, and reduce caregiver burden. A new fixed-dose combination (FDC) capsule containing 28 mg memantine extended release (ER) and 10 mg donepezil was evaluated for bioequivalence with co-administered commercially available memantine ER and donepezil, and for bioavailability with regard to food intake.Two phase I, single-dose, randomized, open-label, crossover studies were conducted in 18- to 45-year-old healthy individuals. In MDX-PK-104 study, fasting participants (N = 38) received co-administered memantine ER and donepezil or the FDC. In MDX-PK-105 study, participants (N = 36) received three treatments: intact FDC taken while fasting or after a high-fat meal, or FDC contents sprinkled on applesauce while fasting. Standard pharmacokinetic parameters for memantine and donepezil were calculated from the plasma concentration time-curve using non-compartmental analyses. Linear mixed-effects models were used to compare: (a) FDC versus co-administered individual drugs; (b) FDC fasted versus with food; and (c) FDC sprinkled on applesauce versus FDC intact, both fasted. Safety parameters were also evaluated.The FDC capsule was bioequivalent to co-administered memantine ER and donepezil. There was no significant food effect on the bioavailability of the FDC components. There were no clinically relevant differences in time to maximum plasma concentration or safety profiles across treatments.An FDC capsule containing 28 mg memantine ER and 10 mg donepezil is bioequivalent to commercially available memantine ER and donepezil, and bioavailability is not affected by food intake or sprinkling of capsule contents on applesauce.


PubMed | 4 Merck, an affiliate of Actavis Inc, Kennedy Krieger Institute, 2 Merck and 2 more.
Type: Comparative Study | Journal: Journal of child and adolescent psychopharmacology | Year: 2015

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of asenapine in adolescents with schizophrenia.In an 8 week, randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled trial, subjects (12-17 years of age) meeting Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th ed., Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR) criteria for schizophrenia were randomized 1:1:1 to placebo, asenapine 2.5mg b.i.d., or asenapine 5mg b.i.d. Subjects who completed the 8 week acute study could participate in a 26 week flexible-dose asenapine-only open-label extension (OLE).A similar percentage of subjects completed treatment on day 56 (2.5mg b.i.d. (n=98): 83%; 5mg b.i.d. [n=106]: 79%; placebo [n=102]: 79%). In the mixed model for repeated measures analysis of the primary end-point (with Hochberg correction for multiplicity), least squares (LS) mean differences between asenapine and placebo on the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) total score at day 56 were not significant (-4.8 for 2.5mg b.i.d., p=0.070; -5.6 for 5mg b.i.d., p=0.064). Significant improvement in the Clinical Global Impressions-Severity score was observed in the 5mg b.i.d. group versus placebo on day 56 (LS mean -0.3, p=0.024). In the acute phase, 7% weight gain and the composite event of somnolence, sedation, and hypersomnia were more common in both asenapine groups than in the placebo group. Akathisia, fasting glucose elevation, and extrapyramidal syndrome were more common in the 5mg b.i.d. group than in the placebo group. There were no unexpected adverse events in the OLE, and PANSS total scores decreased by -16.1 points in the group previously treated with placebo (n=62) and by -11.2 points in the continuous asenapine group (n=131) from OLE baseline to week 26.Although improvements in PANSS total score at day 56 of the acute phase were numerically greater for both asenapine 2.5 and 5mg b.i.d. than for placebo and were maintained in the OLE, the primary end-point did not achieve statistical significance in the acute phase. No new or unexpected safety concerns were detected during the acute phase or after an additional 26 weeks of asenapine treatment in the adolescent population with schizophrenia.NCT01190254 and NCT1190267 at ClinicalTrials.gov.


PubMed | an affiliate of Actavis Inc.
Type: Journal Article | Journal: International clinical psychopharmacology | Year: 2015

Vilazodone is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor and a 5-HT1A receptor partial agonist that is approved for treatment of major depressive disorder in adults in the USA and Mexico. The efficacy, safety, and tolerability of vilazodone for generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) were investigated in a clinical trial (NCT01766401 ClinicalTrials.gov). Participants (18-70 years, inclusive) who met Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th ed., text revision, criteria for GAD were randomized (1:1) to placebo or flexible-dose vilazodone (20-40 mg/day) for 8 weeks of double-blind treatment. Primary and secondary efficacy parameters were changes from baseline to week 8 in Hamilton Rating Scale for Anxiety and Sheehan Disability Scale total scores, respectively. Analysis was based on a mixed-effects model for repeated measures approach on the intent-to-treat population. The intent-to-treat population comprised 395 patients (placebo=197, vilazodone=198); 77% completed the study. The least squares mean difference in change from baseline to week 8 in the Hamilton Rating Scale for Anxiety total score was statistically significant for vilazodone versus placebo [-1.50 (-2.96, -0.04), P=0.0438]. The mean change from baseline to week 8 in the Sheehan Disability Scale total score for vilazodone versus placebo was not statistically significant. Adverse events were reported in 60% of placebo-treated and 83% of vilazodone-treated patients. This was a positive clinical trial of 20-40 mg/day vilazodone versus placebo in the treatment of GAD.


PubMed | Fatigue Consultation Clinic, University of Cincinnati and an affiliate of Actavis Inc.
Type: | Journal: Pediatric rheumatology online journal | Year: 2015

There are no approved medications for juvenile fibromyalgia (JFM), a disorder that is often under-diagnosed. The effects of milnacipran, a drug approved for the management of fibromyalgia (FM) in adults, was assessed in a clinical trial program for JFM.Patients, ages 13-17 years who met the Yunus and Masi criteria for JFM and/or 1990 American College of Rheumatology criteria for FM, were enrolled in a responder-enriched, randomized withdrawal trial. After receiving open-label milnacipran (8 weeks), patients with 50 % improvement in pain underwent double-blind randomization (1:2) to either placebo or continuing treatment with milnacipran (8 weeks). All patients, including those who did not meet the randomization criteria for double-blind withdrawal, were allowed to enter an extension study with open-label milnacipran (up to 52 weeks). The primary endpoint was loss of therapeutic response (LTR) during the double-blind period. Additional outcome measures included the Patient Global Impression of Severity (PGIS), Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL: Generic Core Scales, Multidimensional Fatigue Scale), and Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for Children (MASC). Safety assessments included adverse events (AEs), vital signs, electrocardiograms, and laboratory tests.The milnacipran program was terminated early due to low enrollment. Because only 20 patients were randomized into the double-blind withdrawal period, statistical analyses were not conducted for the LTR endpoint. However, 116 patients entered the open-label period of the initial study and 57 participated in the open-label extension study. Their experience provides preliminary information about the use of milnacipran in JFM patients. During both open-label periods, there were mean improvements in pain severity, PGIC, PedsQL, and MASC scores. No unexpected safety issues were detected. The most commonly reported treatment-emergent AEs were nausea, headache, vomiting, and dizziness. Mean increases in heart rate and blood pressure were observed, and were consistent with the AE profile in adults with FM.The open-label findings provide preliminary evidence that milnacipran may improve symptoms of JFM, with a safety and tolerability profile that is consistent with the experience in adult FM patients. Future trial designs for JFM should consider the relatively low recognition of this condition compared to adult FM and the difficulties with enrollment.NCT01328002 ; NCT01331109.

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